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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Alberti, L. (1960). I libri della famiglia. Opert volgari [Thoughts on Family. The Collections of Works]. Volume 1. Laterza, 472 p. (in Italian). 2. Garin, E. (1971). Educazione umanistica in Italia [Humanistic Education on Italy], Bari, 120 p. (in Italian). 3. Kristeller, P. (1974). Humanismus und Renaissance [Humanism and Renaissance]. Munchen : Fink, 539 p. (in German). 4. Lytvynov, V. (2012). Ukraine: Seeking Its Identity. The 16th-Early 17th Centuries. Historical and

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Valeriu Ciucă

Abstract

The author proposes here “the first Romanian attempt at a hermeneutic systematization of the philosophy of European law”, a field that is approached from an organic, integrating perspective. It has to be seen as a synchronic lectio magistralis on the ineluctable role of the spiritual roots when deciphering and assuming national identity. The complicated “euronomosophical” discourse, whose beginning is an excellent page of self-history about the “Europe” of the author, voices an appeal to a deeper self-knowledge. A complex, dynamic reality: from euromyth to euro-oniria and PaxEuropaea. Such incursions into the universe of law certainly involve an instructive and pedagogical side, building a patchwork of ideas, suggestions and themes that could be further developed.

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Jean-Paul Deremble

Abstract

The main question this article arises is about the nowadays pertinence of the humanist heritage of Chartres. The most radical modernity cannot avoid a permanent cohabitation with the past, with the magic of the cathedral and the memory of an emotional power. Medieval thought has set the standards of a sustainable humanisation that has lost nothing of its topicality. The harmonious equilibrium of eternal beauty, transparent in the spiritual timeless message of Chartres attests that the medieval concept of humanism is still intelligible for the modern sensitivity

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Astrid Guillaume

Abstract

At a time when humanity experiences its greatest advances, major conflicts and abuses arise around the world due to a lack of humanism and reason within the meaning of the Enlightenment. Modernity and western comfort in our globalized society have not helped share and balance the wealth, nor preserve the natural resources; it has not prevented crimes against humanity nor the most insane dictatorial actions of the 20th and early 21st centuries. This went hand in hand with a massive degradation of the environment. Could the animal be the solution to all the mistakes we have made during the last century, instead of being considered an inferior, a slave? Could he not be the one who has managed the best in the fields of intelligence, self-regulation and respect of his vital environment? Should we not rather turn toward the animal to find a new balanced model? Respecting the environment and his peers seems to be the most striking evidence of intelligence, does it not? The animal has achieved this. Man has not. Focusing on the way man has treated animals may therefore help us to understand why we have treated our peers so badly.

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Viera Plechová

Abstract

The article deals with the ideas of humanity and morality as reflected in the works of R. W. Emerson, the main representative of an intellectual movement called American transcendentalism. It conveys basic facts about the movement and focuses on the key aspects of Emerson’s transcendental philosophy, particularly his concept of the Over-soul and his concept of Nature, which gave his humanistic philosophy a religious and moral accent. Due to it, Emerson’s religious humanism also became the basis of American democratic individualism. The article offers insight into Emerson’s ideas on morality and ethical behaviour, which challenge us to live in harmony with God and nature.

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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Домбровський, І. (1995). Дніпрові камені. Українські гуманісти епохи Відродження. Антологія [Dnipro Stones. Ukrainian humanist of Renaissance. Anthology]. K. : Наукова думка; Основи, Part 2, p. 200–221 (in Ukrainian). 2. Кленович, С. (1984). Роксоланія. Антологія української поезії [Roksolania. Anthology of Ukrainian poetry]. V. 1. K. : Дніпро, p. 62–77 (in Ukrainian). 3. Литвинов, В. (2000). Ренесансний гуманізм в Україні [Renaissance humanism in Ukraine]. K : Основи, p. 468 (in Ukrainian). 4. Литвинов, В. (2005). Католицька Русь

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Helen Cahill, Julia Coffey and Kylie Smith

Abstract

The development of gendered identities during early childhood and youth occurs in a context of ‘body culture’ and the hyper-visibility of ‘perfect’ bodies, which align with traditional gender ideals. Embodied methods can assist to make complexity more visible, and to allow participants to see fluidity, shifts, and becoming. Whilst there has been significant theoretical development, further methodological innovations are needed to enable children and youth to articulate their perceptions of the way multiple influences shape their relations with their own bodies. Informed by ‘new materialist’ feminist theory this article will examine the work of Australian educators exploring use of creative and embodied drama-based play. The chapter advances methodologies to support pedagogical engagement with young children and youth about gender, identity and social change. The authors explore how embodied creative play can be used across ages to support children and young people to articulate the ways social norms and expectations influence their desires, imaginings, fears and actions and their perceptions of what is possible, desirable or appropriate in relation to performances of gender in their everyday worlds.

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Sorina Chiper

Abstract

The Education of Henry Adams owes its cultural cachet, in part, to Adams’ elaboration of a dichotomy that has pitted religion against science and technology. Though Western ideologies of modernity have viewed religion in rather negative terms, the current revival of religiosity in the postist context (post-modern, post-communist, post-colonial, post-human) invites a reconsideration of the role of religious belief, practice and objects/symbols in the current society. This article discusses Henry Adams’s dichotomy of the Virgin and the Dynamo, and recontextualizes it from a post-human perspective. It argues that the return of religiosity or spirituality, in its multiple forms, is an ethical stance that signals a cultural need for the feminine values of care, solidarity, affection and affiliation.

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Nataliia Petruk

Abstract

The article is dedicated to analysis of the content and the peculiarities of school education in Ukraine in view of disseminating the leading ideas of European humanistic pedagogy during the 16th-17th centuries. It has been noted that during the period of disseminating humanistic ideas the principles of Ukrainian education and Ukrainian school were forming in an active interaction with European culture and European education. Ukrainian school education is seen as a phenomenon that has accumulated the values of Western European humanistic culture, namely, respect for the individual, awareness of intellectual activity importance, the value of labour, understanding of the need for education and knowledge of languages. An active role in disseminating the pan-European models of education has been played by an intellectual environment, which was forming in the well known cultural and educational centers of Ukraine of the 16th-17th centuries, such as the Ostroh Culture and Education Center, the Lviv Brother School, the Kyiv Brother School, the Kyiv Collegium. Ukrainian intellectual elite, namely, university professors, teachers, students, have become the main carriers of education. The nature of the processes taking place in the educational space of Ukraine have been significantly influenced by the circumstances of religious life associated with the protection of the Orthodox Church before the onset of Catholicism. High standards of education, knowledge of the old classical and modern European languages were an important basis for the full-fledged spiritual development of the Ukrainian ethnic group. A retrospective consideration of the past reveals new meanings and imperatives in development of modern Ukrainian education, and the rich experience of Ukrainian teachers, collegium lecturers, professors of the first universities justify the necessary reasons for Ukrainian education entering into the European space.

Open access

The Post-Human Society

Elemental Contours of the Aesthetic Economy of the United States

Rajani Kanth