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Daniel Brennan

: Faber and Faber. CASSIRER, E. (1982): “Mind” and “Life”: Heidegger, trans. D. Krois. In: Philosophy and Rhetoric, 16(3), pp. 160–163. COHEN, R. (2006): Introduction. In: E. Levinas: Humanism of the Other , trans. N. Poller. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, pp. vi–xlvi. CRITCHLEY, S. (2015): The Problem with Levinas . Oxford: Oxford University Press. DAVIS, C. (1996): Levinas: An introduction . Cambridge: Polity Press. DENEEN, P. (1999): The Politics of Hope and Optimism: Rorty, Havel, and the Democratic Faith of John Dewey. In

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Andrew Miles

Care of the Patient’. JAMA 1984;252:819-20. 8. Cox J, Campbell A, Fulford W. Medicine of the Person: Faith, Science and Values in Healthcare Provision. London: Jessica Kingsley;2007. 9. Engel GL. The need for a new medical model: a challenge for biomedicine. Science 1977;196:129-36. 10. Engel GL. The clinical application of the biopsychosocial model. American Journal of Psychiatry 1980;137:535-44. 11. Miles A. Person-centered medicine - at the intersection of science, ethics and humanism. Int J Pers Cent

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Joan Cuscó Clarasó

. Cirici, A. : El concepte de bellesa de Francesc Pujols. In F. Figueras, Francesc Pujols pels seus amics . Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, 1991: 105-129. Cirlot, J. : El Arte de Gaudí. Barcelona: Ediciones Omega, 1950. Clovis, P. (Ed.).: Le Vision artístiques et religieuse de Gaudí. Barcelona: Aymà, 1971 [1969]. Cuscó, J. : Francesc Pujols i Morgades. El filòsof heterodox. Barcelona: PAM, 2008. Cuscó, J.: Eugeni d’Ors. Philosophy and Humanism in the Twenthieth Century. Jounal Of Catalan Intellectual History (JOCIH) 9 (2013): 91

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Natalia Petruk

References 1. Alberti, L. (1960). I libri della famiglia. Opert volgari [Thoughts on Family. The Collections of Works]. Volume 1. Laterza, 472 p. (in Italian). 2. Garin, E. (1971). Educazione umanistica in Italia [Humanistic Education on Italy], Bari, 120 p. (in Italian). 3. Kristeller, P. (1974). Humanismus und Renaissance [Humanism and Renaissance]. Munchen : Fink, 539 p. (in German). 4. Lytvynov, V. (2012). Ukraine: Seeking Its Identity. The 16th-Early 17th Centuries. Historical and

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Valeriu Ciucă

Abstract

The author proposes here “the first Romanian attempt at a hermeneutic systematization of the philosophy of European law”, a field that is approached from an organic, integrating perspective. It has to be seen as a synchronic lectio magistralis on the ineluctable role of the spiritual roots when deciphering and assuming national identity. The complicated “euronomosophical” discourse, whose beginning is an excellent page of self-history about the “Europe” of the author, voices an appeal to a deeper self-knowledge. A complex, dynamic reality: from euromyth to euro-oniria and PaxEuropaea. Such incursions into the universe of law certainly involve an instructive and pedagogical side, building a patchwork of ideas, suggestions and themes that could be further developed.

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Jean-Paul Deremble

Abstract

The main question this article arises is about the nowadays pertinence of the humanist heritage of Chartres. The most radical modernity cannot avoid a permanent cohabitation with the past, with the magic of the cathedral and the memory of an emotional power. Medieval thought has set the standards of a sustainable humanisation that has lost nothing of its topicality. The harmonious equilibrium of eternal beauty, transparent in the spiritual timeless message of Chartres attests that the medieval concept of humanism is still intelligible for the modern sensitivity

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Viera Plechová

Abstract

The article deals with the ideas of humanity and morality as reflected in the works of R. W. Emerson, the main representative of an intellectual movement called American transcendentalism. It conveys basic facts about the movement and focuses on the key aspects of Emerson’s transcendental philosophy, particularly his concept of the Over-soul and his concept of Nature, which gave his humanistic philosophy a religious and moral accent. Due to it, Emerson’s religious humanism also became the basis of American democratic individualism. The article offers insight into Emerson’s ideas on morality and ethical behaviour, which challenge us to live in harmony with God and nature.

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Carmen Bizzarri

Abstract

The first part of this paper describes the flow of tourism on a national and international scale, emphasizing the role that entertainment tourism and theme parks play globally. Following these preliminary remarks, the second part of the paper presents the positive and negative economic effects of leisure tourism opportunities at the European and regional level. The third part of the paper analyses the environmental aspects of tourism and entertainment tourism. It shows that sustainable tourism development can be an essential condition for the protection of natural and cultural resources. Finally, the fourth part summarizes some of the most important social issues arising from tourism activities, among them the conflict between residents and tourists on the exploitation of resources and the demonstration effect deriving from the consumption of resources. To avoid this spoliation and destruction of the destination (land and local community), the paper suggests a new Humanism based on Catholicism as a way to realize a sustainability utopia.

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Alina Nowicka-Jeżowa

Summary

Based on earlier research, and especially Tadeusz Ulewicz’s landmark study Iter Romano- -Italicum Polonorum, or the Intellectual and Cultural Links between Poland and Italy in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (1999) this article examines the influence of Rome - in its role as the Holy See and a centre of learning and the arts - on Poland’s culture in the 15th and 16th century as well as on the activities of Polish churchmen, scholars and writers who came to the Eternal City. The aim of the article is to trace the role of the emerging Humanist themes and attitudes on the shape of the cultural exchange in question. It appears that the Roman connection was a major factor in the history of Polish Humanism - its inner development, its transformations, and the ideological and artistic choices made by the successive generations of the Polish elite. In the 15th century the Roman inspirations helped to initiate the Humanist impulse in Poland, while in the 16th century they stimulated greater diversity and a search for one’s own way of development. In the post-Tridentine epoch they became a potent element of the Poland’s new cultural formation. Against the background of these generalizations, the article presents the cultural profiles of four poets, Mikołaj of Hussów, Klemens Janicjusz, Jan Kochanowski, and Mikołaj Sęp Szarzyński. They symbolize the four phases of the Polish Humanist tradition, which draw their distinctive identities from looking up to the Roman model

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Tibor Máhrik

Abstract

This paper focuses on the dynamics of ethical perspectives that embody the Golden Rule of Morality. Based on critical analysis of this rule in various cultural and religious contexts, but also from the perspective of humanism, the author presents its paradoxical character, the essence of which is interpreted here in terms of a pointer to metaphysical reality. It turns out that social conditionality, as well as the self-referential concept as a starting point of any ethical reasoning, are serious epistemological challenges for the application of the Golden Rule in the position of universal normativity that this study addresses. On the other hand, Judeo-Christian cosmology and the related basis for ethical foundations is presented here as an inspirational space of ethical reasoning in which the paradoxical character of the Golden Rule becomes rather an indicator of a deeper metaethical interpretation of one's own particular ethical attitudes and outcomes than a practical guide to the discovery of ethical universals.