Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • Literary Theory x
Clear All
Open access

Patricia G. Berman

W orks cited Alphen, Ernst van. “Modernity as a Crisis of the Senses.” Modern Sensibilities Conference, 23–24 March 2017, Munch Museum, Oslo. Lecture. Bal, Mieke. “Ecstatic Aesthetics.” Compelling Visuality: The Work of Art in and Out of Art History. Ed. Claire J. Farago and Robert Zwijnenberg. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2003. 1–30. Print. Bal, Mieke. Emma and Edvard Looking Sideways: Loneliness and the Cinematic. New Haven: Yale, 2017. Print. Bal, Mieke and Michelle Williams Gamaker. Madame B . Video Exhibition. Oslo: Munch

Open access

Dorota Filipczak

of Chicago P, 2008. Print. ---. Murder and Difference: Gender, Genre and Scholarship on Sisera’s Death. Bloomington: U of Indiana P, 1988. Print. ---. Travelling Concepts in the Humanities: A Rough Guide. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2002. Print. ---, and Michelle Williams Gamaker. From Novel to Exhibition: Translation and Performance. Seminar recording courtesy of Muzeum Sztuki. Łódź 2013. ---, and Michelle Williams Gamaker. Madame B. Video Exhibition. Łódź: Muzeum Sztuki, 2013. ---, and

Open access

Alison Jasper

Abstract

The theorist and philosopher Julia Kristeva is invited to curate an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris as part of a series-Parti Pris (Taking Sides)- and to turn this into a book, The Severed Head: Capital Visions. The organiser, Régis Michel, wants something partisan, that will challenge people to think, and Kristeva delivers in response a collection of severed heads neatly summarising her critique of the whole of western culture! Three figures dominate, providing a key to making sense of the exhibition: Freud, Bataille, and the maternal body. Using these figures, familiar from across the breadth of her work over the last half a century, she produces a witty analysis of western culture’s persistent privileging of disembodied masculine rationality; the head, ironically phallic, ironically and yet necessarily severed; the maternal body continually arousing a “jubilant anxiety” (Kristeva, Severed Head 34), expressed through violence. Points of critique are raised in relation to Kristeva’s normative tendencies-could we not tell a different story about women, for example? The cultural context of the exhibition is also addressed: who are the intended viewers/readers and whose interests are being served here? Ultimately, however, this is a celebration of Kristeva’s tribute to psychic survivors.

Open access

Mieke Bal and Rachel E. Burke

Abstract

After Rachel E. Burke briefly introduces the essays presented with a focus on our contemporary relationship to modern subjectivity, Mieke Bal will make the case for the sense of presentness on an affective and sensuous level in Munch’s paintings and Flaubert’s writing by selecting a few topics and cases from the book Emma and Edvard Looking Sideways: Loneliness and the Cinematic, published by the Munch Museum in conjunction with the exhibition Emma & Edvard. It is this foregrounded presentness that not only produces the ongoing thematic relevance of these works, but more importantly, the sense-based conceptualism that declares art and life tightly bound together. If neither artist eliminated figuration in favour of abstraction, they had a good reason for that. Art is not a representation of life, but belongs to it, illuminates it and helps us cope with it by sharpening our senses. As an example, a few paintings will clarify what I mean by the noun-qualifier “cinematic” and how that aesthetic explains the production of loneliness.

Open access

Dorota Filipczak

Abstract

The article offers a reading of “Through the Panama” by Malcom Lowry in light of an intertext connected with Polish literature. Lowry mentions a short story “The Lighthouse Keeper of Aspinwall” by the Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz, the Nobel prize winner for the whole of his literary output. What Lowry stresses in his intertextual allusion is the perilous illumination that the eponymous lighthouse keeper experiences. The article contends that the condition of the lighthouse keeper anticipates that of the Lowry protagonist who in “Through the Panama” fears death by his own book, or, to take Lowry’s other phrase, being “Joyced in his own petard.” Basing her analysis on Mieke Bal’s idea of a participatory exhibition where the viewer decides how to approach a video installation, and can do so by engaging with a single detail, Filipczak treats Lowry’s text as a multimodal work where such a detail may give rise to a reassessment of the reading experience. Since the allusion to the Polish text has only elicited fragmentary responses among the Lowry critics, Filipczak decides to fill in the gap by providing her interpretation of the lighthouse keeper’s perilous illumination mentioned by Lowry in the margins of his work, and by analyzing it in the context of major Romantic texts, notably the epic poem Master Thaddeus by Adam Mickiewicz whose words trigger the lighthouse keeper’s experience, and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whose text is quoted in the margins of “Through the Panama.” This choice allows to throw a different light on Lowry’s work which is also inhabited by echoes of futurist attitude to the machine and the Kafkaesque fear of being locked in one of the many locks of the canal “as if in experience.”

Open access

Jonathan Culler

W orks cited Allen, Woody. “The Kugelmass Episode.” Side Effects . New York: Random, 1980. 41–56. Print. Bal, Mieke. “Over-writing as Un-writing.” A Mieke Bal Reader . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2006. 96–145. Print. Bal, Mieke, and Michelle Williams Gamaker. Madame B: Explorations in Emotional Capitalism. Video Exhibition. Cinema Suitcase, 2012–14. Baudelaire, Charles. “ Madame Bovary de Gustave Flaubert.” Oeuvres complètes . Paris: Gallimard, 1961. 647–57. Print. Culler, Jonathan. Flaubert: The Uses of Uncertainty . Ithaca

Open access

Dorota Filipczak

W orks cited Allen, Prudence. The Concept of Woman Vol. 2: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500, Part 2 . Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2005. Print. Bal, Mieke, and Michelle Williams Gamaker. Madame B. Video Exhibition. Łódź: Muzeum Sztuki, 2013. Brennan Croft, Janet. “Bid the Tree Unfix His Earthbound Root: Motifs from Macbeth in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. ” Tolkien and Shakespeare: Essays on Shared Themes and Language. Ed. Janet Brennan Croft, Donald E. Palumbo and C. W. Sullivan III. Jefferson: McFarland, 2007

Open access

Miguel Ángel Hernández Navarro

. Bal, Mieke, Jonathan V. Crewe, and Leo Spitzer. Acts of Memory: Cultural Recall in the Present. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College, 1999. Print. Bal, Mieke, and Michelle Williams Gamaker. Madame B: Explorations in Emotional Capitalism. Video Exhibition. Cinema Suitcase, 2012–14. Benjamin, Walter. “Paralipomena to ‘On the Concept of History.’” Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings . Ed. Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings. Vol. 4. Trans. Edmund Jephcott et al. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2003. 401–11. Print. Burges, Joel, and Amy J. Elias. Time: A

Open access

Natalie Meisner and Donia Mounsef

Exhibition”, University of Saskatchewan. December 2013. <http://library.usask.ca/herstory/herstory.html>. Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. London: Penguin, 1988. Print. Homer. The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. New York: Doubleday, 1989. Print. Hutcheon, Linda. A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms. New York: Methuen, 1985. Print. Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman. Trans. Gillian Gill. Ithaca: Cornell University Press P, 1985. Print ---. This Sex Which Is Not One. Trans