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Does history-taking help predict rabies diagnosis in dogs?

. Tepsumethanon V, Lumlertdacha B, Mitmoonpitak C, Sitprija V, Meslin F-X, Wilde H. Survival of naturally infected rabid dogs and cats. CID. 2004; 39:278-80. 8. Tepsumethanon V, Wilde H, Meslin F-X. Six criteria for rabies diagnosis in living dogs. J Med Assoc Thai. 2005; 88:419-22. 9. Tepsumethanon V, Wilde H, Sitprija V. Ten-day observation of live rabies suspected dogs. In: Dodet B, Fooks AR, Muller T, et al, editors. Towards the elimination of rabies in Eurasia. Dev Biol. Basel: Karger, 2008, Vol 131, p. 543-6. 10

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How not to fight a rabies epidemic: a history in Bali

suspect rabid dogs, after four deaths. Jakarta Post. November 28, 2008. 8. Sertori T. When smuggling becomes a public health issue. Jakarta Post. February 29, 2009. 9. de Suryani L. Check monkey colonies for rabies, local administrations urged. Jakarta Post. January 3, 2009. 10. Gautret P, Lim PL, Shaw M, Leder K. Rabies postexposure prophylaxis in travelers returning from Bali, Indonesia, Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010; May 19 (Epub ahead of print). 11. Henzell E. On the wrong track with rabies. Bali Times

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Prevalence of respiratory viruses isolated from dogs in Thailand during 2008-2009

References 1. Sherding RG. Canine Infectious Tracheobronchitis (Kennel Cough). In: Birchard S, Sherding RG, eds. Saunders Manual of Small Animal Practice. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Saunders; 2006. p. 151-3. 2. Dysko RC, Nemzek JA, Levin SI, DeMarco GJ, Moalli MR. Biology and Diseases of Dogs. In: Fox JG, Anderson LC, Loew FM, Quimby FW, eds. Laboratory Animal Medicine. 2nd ed. New hampshire: Academic press; 2002. p. 395-498. 3. Damián M, Morales E, Salas G, Trigo FJ. Immunohistochemical detection of antigens of

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Trichuris vulpis and T. trichiura infections among schoolchildren of a rural community in northwestern Thailand: the possible role of dogs in disease transmission

, Aldeen WE, Davis M, Carroll KC. Trichuris vulpis recovered from a patient with chronic diarrhea and five dogs. J Clin Microbiol. 2002; 40:2703-4. 20. Kenney M, Yermakov V. Infection of man with Trichuris vulpis, the whipworm of dogs. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1980; 29:1205-8. 21. Yoshikawa H, Yamada M, Matsumoto Y, Yoshida Y. Variations in egg size of Trichuris trichiura. Parasitol Res. 1989; 75:649-54. 22. Lovis L, Mak TK, Phongluxa K, Soukhathammavong P, Sayasone S, Akkhavong K, et al. PCR diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini

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Dog rabies: the first case reported from Sultanate of Oman

Abstract

Background: There has been no report of dog rabies in Sultanate of Oman, possibly due to an inadequate active and passive surveillance and response system.

Methods: We recently developed Fluorescent Antibody Test (FAT) and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a sensitive diagnosis of rabies.

Results: We present the first laboratory proven canine rabies case in Sultanate of Oman. Laboratory facilities for sensitive diagnosis are now available in Sultanate of Oman.

Conclusion: A systematic surveillance system for rabies in domesticated dogs will have a good influence on the control of this zoonotic infection in Sultanate of Oman.

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Pasteurella multocida infections in cancer patients

Abstract

Background: Pasteurella multocida is a small, gram-negative coccobacillus, which most commonly causes soft tissue infections due to animal bites or scratches, mainly from cats and dogs. Immunocompromised hosts, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop systemic complications as a result of P. multocida infections. Objective: Retrospectively analyze the medical records of four afflicted patients being managed at Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, USA between 1999 and 2009, and careful study for additional 32 cases of P. multocida infection among cancer patients with variegated histology found in the current medical literature. Methods: Of 36 subjects, 67% of the patients had been diagnosed with a solid organ cancer, whereas 33% had a hematologic malignancy. Clinical scenarios described fever as the most frequent initial presentation and bacteremia as the most prevalent mode of infection. Results: Forty-seven percent of the patients had experienced some sort of animal contact and 41% showed evidence of skin or soft tissue infection. The status of the white blood cell count, was available in 22 patients (of 36 patients), and 27% demonstrated neutropenia. The survival percentage of the patients with known clinical outcome was 77%. Conclusion: Medical management mostly involved antibiosis with beta-lactams. Atypical scenario of Pasteurella multocida infection may involve bites or scratches (specifically from cats or dogs) in a cancer patient presenting with sepsis and accompanied by skin or soft tissue or respiratory tract infection. A high level of suspicion for P. multocida as a possible pathogen in cancer patients would facilitate an amelioration in morbidity ameliorating, and timely initiation of specific antibiotics.

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Commentary. How to eradicate canine rabies: a perspective of historical efforts

. [cited July 18, 2006]. Available from http://www.smallpoxhistory.ucl.ac.uk/. 4. Rabies vaccination for dogs urged for county. Oakland Tribune, July 23, 1922. 5. Issue dog tags minus vaccine. Tucson Daily Citizen. March 7, 1949. 6. Irked county may ‘Order’ dog shots. Syracuse Herald- Journal, July 15, 1951. 7. Phillip Rawls. Rabies spreads as vaccinations decline. Associated Press. June 3, 2005. 8. Complacency raises rabies risk. Yomiuri Shimbun. April 3, 2007. 9. Reid

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Acute effect of Russell’s viper (Daboia siamensis) venom on renal tubular handling of sodium in isolated rabbit kidney

References 1. Chaiyabutr N, Kingkheawkanthong W, Smuntavekin S, Kidmungtangdee S, Sitprija V. Renal function following Russell’s viper venom administration in dogs treated with an α-adrenergic receptor blocker, inhibitors of converting enzyme and thromboxane synthetase. J Nat Toxin. 1996; 5:389-99. 2. Sitprija V, Chaiyabutr N. Nephrotoxicity in snake envenomation. J Nat Toxin. 1999; 8:271-7. 3. Thamaree S, Sitprija V, Chaiyabutr N, Leepipatpaiboon S, Buranakarl C. Effects of intrarenal arterial infusion of

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Ethics and the “Milwaukee protocol” for human rabies treatment

References 1. Jabr F. Rabies may not be the invincible killer of man [Internet]. 2011. Available from www.newscientist.com/article/dn20593 2. Fekadu M, Baer GM. Recovery from rabies of 2 dogs inoculated with a rabies virus from Ethiopia. American. J Vet Res. 1980; 41:1632-4. 3. Kuzmin IV, Franka R, Rupprecht CE. Experimental infection of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) with West Caucasian bat virus (WCBV). Dev Biol (Basel). 2008; 131:327-37. 4. Oh SY, Kim SA, Kim JY, Yoo HS, Lee KK, Shin NS

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Effects of Bungarus candidus (Malayan krait) venom on general circulation and renal hemodynamics in experimental animals

. Gitelman H. Clinical Chemistry-Calcium-OCresolpthalein complexone method. Anal Biochem. 1967; 20: 521. 9. Aird SD. Ophidian envenomation strategies and the role of purines. Toxicon. 2002; 40:335-93. 10. Tungthanathanich P, Chaiyabutr N, Sitprija V. Effect of Russell’s viper (Vipera russelli siamensis) venom on renal hemodynamics in dogs. Toxicon. 1986; 24: 365-71. 11. Watanabe L, Nirthanan S, Rajaseger G, Polikarpov I, Kini RM, Arni RK. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of bucain, a novel toxin from the Malayan

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