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Open access

Ünal Çakıroğlu, Seyfullah Gökoğlu and Mücahit Öztürk

Abstract

Drawing on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), this exploratory study examines the preservice teachers’ adoption of mobile technologies through the factors of current use, instructional use and future use in their teaching practices. Participants were 466 pre-service computer teachers enrolled at a public university in Turkey. A questionnaire developed by the researchers was used to collect data. Results indicated that the current use and instructional use factors had a strong positive correlation and also there was a similar correlation with the factor of future use and current use. Relationships between current, instructional, and future use of mobile technologies explained within the context of perceived usefulness, ease of use, and behavioural intention constructs of the TAM.

Open access

Giannakoudakis Zacharias and Giossos Yiannis

Abstract

The aim of this research was to study the differences in social presence and autonomy concerning the two methods of education used in a training program for science teachers in the years 2015-2016. The first method was the traditional face to face and the other was the Distance Education method. In particular, the study focused on whether there are differences in the social presence and autonomy between the two teaching methods, and the teaching experience of the participants. A closed-type questionnaire of Likert type was used to collect the data, while t-test for independent samples was used for statistical analysis. The study indicated differences in the social presence and autonomy between the two methods of teaching.

Open access

Beatriz de los Arcos, Bram Faems, Anna Comas-Quinn and Hélène Pulker

Abstract

The affordance of social interaction has been a part of open online repositories of teaching and learning resources for nearly two decades. Repositories are built not only to collect and disseminate materials, but enable users to collaborate and review, comment on and rate the content they access. However, research indicates that (a) most users do not participate in this type of generative use, and (b) the possibility of social interaction does not necessarily signal active participation in social interaction. In recent years the positive effects of gamification and social networking elements on user engagement have come to the fore in educational settings. From this stance, a quantitative study was conducted to assess users’ acceptance of the existing game mechanics of a large national repository of educational resources, their attitudes towards the inclusion of extra features, and teachers’ motivation to share openly. Our results indicate that teachers do not see open repositories as social networks, but as libraries of resources, and are likely to share if rewarded by intrinsic rather than extrinsic factors.

Open access

Michael Sean Gallagher and Pekka Ihanainen

Abstract

This paper proposed a method for developing capacity for lifelong learning in open spaces, defined here as places without predefined learning structures or objectives, through the cultivation of aesthetic literacy. This discussion will be situated within fieldwork performed by the authors in Helsinki, Finland, and Tallinn, Estonia, in 2013. Based on the researchers’ experience in the field of teacher education and workshops they have conducted on mobile learning, the empirical context for this discussion focuses on data generated from the research methods of participatory observation (ethnography), autoethnography, reflective concept analysis and artistic subjectivity. These methods and the data generated as a result collect to produce insight into how aesthetic literacy sits within the cross-section of open space, mobile learning, and lifelong learning,

Aesthetic literacy, appropriated and broadened from its original focus as capacity for “reading” or making meaning from artistic material (discussed in Gale, 2005 as the “living of lyrical moments”), is positioned in this paper as a means of making meaning in open spaces through alignment and attunement. This paper presents pragmatic methods for pedagogically cultivating learning in open spaces through a focus on aesthetic literacy. The pedagogical advantages of such an approach and its applicability to lifelong learning, particularly lifelong learning activated through mobile technology (or mobile lifelong learning-mLLL), follows along with recommendations for further research. The applicability of such research is for teachers, learners, or researchers who are looking for methods for making use of open spaces for learning, or to cultivate learners who actively seek learning in the “rhythms of the everyday” (Lankshear & Knobel, 2011).

The aim of the article is to produce fresh insights into the academic discussion about the nature of open space, mobile learning and lifelong learning as seem from the point of view of aesthetic literacy, insights we believe have distinct pedagogical advantages for mLLL.

Focal Area: Informal arenas of learning – learning opportunities in daily life and the workplace; Learning process design, teaching methodologies

Open access

Tharindu R. Liyanagunawardena, Sandra Scalzavara and Shirley A. Williams

.), Enhancing Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century Academic Library (pp. 121-134). 18. Ifenthaler, D., Bellin-Mularski, N, & Mah, D (Eds.) (2016). Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials. Springer. 19. International Scouting Collectors Association. (n.d.). Collecting Merit Badges: The ISCA Getting Started Collecting Series. Retrieved from http://www.scouttrader.org/collecting/meritbadge.pdf 20. Jamali, H. R., & Asadi. S. (2010). Google and the scholar: the role of Google in scientists’ information

Open access

Jozef Drga, Martin Bulko, Karol Petrík, Mária Csatáryová and Stanislav Šimkovič

Abstract

Visual meteor observations are a fun and interesting approach to astronomy and to scientific research in general. It can be used for laboratory or practical exercises in physics at high schools and universities. The students can personally collect and analyze the acquired data. The output consists of Zenithal Hourly Rate (ZHR) values, spatial density and population index. In this paper, the so called counting method is described as it is the most suitable method for beginners. As a practical example, the ZHR curve of the Lyrid meteor shower was evaluated and the maximum and the duration of the shower were calculated.

Open access

Jaroslav Oberuč and Ladislav Zapletal

Abstract

Introduction: The development of a child takes place according to certain laws, each one of which has its own individual dynamics, so, every child becomes a unique human being. Children gradually collect information about themselves and the world around them. They receive feedback about themselves from people who take care of them - mainly their family, mother and father. Their positive responses support the child’s feeling of being loved, worthy of interest, which has a positive effect on them. Purpose: Family environment is likely to have the strongest impact on the child’s behaviour. Educational procedures, family climate, relationships between parents, those between parents and the child, the degree and methods of satisfying the child’s needs, moral values, and social ties of the family - they all affect the child’s behaviour. Methods: In the presented paper, traditional desk research methods were used. Conclusions: Behaviour is learned and has its purpose. Family teaches the child many things, e.g. how to cope with simple tasks, as well as about complex social inclusion.

Open access

Jana Goriup, Jadranka Stričević and Vida Sruk

Abstract

Introduction: Although there has been considerable discussion regarding the presence of therapeutic aspects of humour in the nurse educational programme and syllabus, little is known about the use of humour in the nurse - patient relationship and the needed topics in the Slovene educational system for nurses. From educational and medical perspectives, humour is anything that evokes laughter and it has been proven that laughter contributes to physical health. A sense of humour in nursing has a conformist, quantitative and productive importance which is manifested through the essential elements of humour: meta-communication sensitivity, personal affection for humour and emotional admissibility. As nurses spend a lot of time with patients, humour adds to the quality of their work as well as to the nurses’ satisfaction with their work with patients. The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the significance of humour in nursing both for the employees and for the patients and to discuss humour within the framework of nursing profession in Slovenia. The specific objective of our study is to explore the attitudes of Slovenian nurses towards humour and their actual use of humour during their interaction with patients. Methods: For the purpose of this study, a quantitative research methodology was adopted. A questionnaire was used to collect data on the topic and a set of statistical analyses (frequency distribution method, the χ2 and Spearman rank correlation test) was performed on the data obtained. Results: Our study shows that Slovenian nurses are prone to the use of humour in their work and they welcome it as an integral part of their work with patients. We found that humour also enhances their sense of belonging to the nursing profession and serves as a tool for socialization. Discussion: Humour, employed in nursing can help overcome certain difficulties which nurses face in the workplace as they also try to fulfil some social objectives and get socialized via humour. These psychological-sociological features of humour stand out as cognitive and social benefits of the positive emotions of joy, the use of humour for social communication and their influence on the release of stress and coping, which draws from the ergonomics of humour as social interaction. Therefore, topics of humour in nurse education are required. Limitations: 279 Slovenian nurses with different levels of education participated in the study. Conclusions: Humour should be used by nurses since it is important in their professional interaction with patients. It can be used as a bridge between individuals and can serve as a means of individual's integration into groups, cultures and, consequently, into the society as a whole.