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Lenka Matějová, Juraj Nemec, Milan Křápek and Daniel Klimovský

Abstract

Many countries have carried out extensive amalgamation-related territorial reforms at the level of local self-government and created relatively large municipalities. The Czech Republic is one of the few remaining European countries with a fragmented territorial structure. There is a lot of discussion in the country about the need for amalgamation, but this discussion is mainly based on political arguments rather than on empirical evidence about the feasibility of amalgamation and its potential to improve local government performance. This paper analyses economies of scale on the local level as a factor that should be reflected in debates about the pros and cons of amalgamation in the Czech Republic. To add to the existing knowledge about the reality of economies of scale on the municipal level in the Czech Republic, we processed the municipal costs of three selected areas on a representative sample of municipalities in the South Moravian Region. The analysis showed that economies of scale can be identified for collecting local fees and for pre-school and elementary education, but not for local administration. Our results suggest that the existence of too small municipalities in the Czech Republic results in inefficiencies and should be addressed.

Open access

The ›Head of Household‹

A Long Normative History of a Statistical Category in the U.K

Kerstin Brückweh

The household forms an important category in social science research. It is used to collect data, to classify it and to represent the results. In 2009, for example, 3.48 % of U.K. households were classified as the most influential and wealthiest individuals in the U.K.; at the other end 5.16 % of U.K. households formed the most disadvantaged people. While the households in the first group represented positions of power in the private and public sector and could afford luxury items, the latter had a budget to only cope with the daily necessities. Experian

Open access

Aodh Quinlivan

Abstract

The financial crisis from 2008 has had a profound impact on Irish local government. Councils were faced with a disastrous combination of factors - declining funding from central government, difficulties in collecting commercial rates as businesses struggled, and a drastic fall in revenue from development levies. Staffing levels in the local government sector were reduced by over 20 per cent, significantly more than the losses suffered by central government ministries and departments. Yet the financial crisis also offered an opportunity for reform and a fundamental reappraisal of subnational government in Ireland. A reform strategy produced in 2012 paved the way for the Local Government Reform Act, 2014. As a result of this legislation, the number of local authorities was reduced from 114 to 31 with the complete abolition of all town councils. The number of council seats also fell from 1,627 to 949. Using Scharpf’s dimensions of democratic legitimacy, this article assesses whether the focus of the 2014 reforms was on output legitimacy (efficiency and effectiveness) as opposed to input legitimacy (citizen integration and participation).

Open access

Adele McKeown and Lorcan Sirr

References Arkcoll, K., Guilding, C., Lamminamki, D., McManus, L., & Warnken, J. (2013). Funding common property expenditure in multi-owned housing schemes. Property Management, 31 (4), 282–96. Bailey, N., & Robertson, D. (1997) Management of flats in multiple ownership: Learning from other countries . Bristol: Policy Press. Bowe O’Brien Solicitors. (2009). Show me the money – Collecting debts in difficult financial times. Retrieved from www.accountingnet.ie [13 March 2018]. Christudason, A. (2004). Common property in strata titled

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Vivienne Byers, Daragh Fahey, Carol Mullins and Carol Roe

-care delivery from the front-line. Journal of Nursing Management. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/jonm.12342 Coulter, A., Locock, L., Ziebland, S., & Calabrese, J. (2014). Collecting data on patient experience is not enough: They must be used to improve care. British Medical Journal, 348, g2225. Darker, C. D. (2014). Hospital governance in Ireland - The dilemma of diversity. Administration, 62 (1), 5-28. Department of Health. (2012). Future health. A strategic framework for reform of the health services 2012

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Stefan Couperus, Harm Kaal, Nico Randeraad and Paul van Trigt

relief was another field where public and private interests tended to interblend and sometimes clash. The Constitution of 1814 made poor relief explicitly the ›subject of constant concern‹ for the national government, but this did not mean it became the financial responsibility of the state. The main tasks of the provincial government were to collect information about local poor relief, to check the finances of the institutions that were active in the field, and to monitor compliance with national laws. According to the Poor Law of 1818 (›Wet op het domicilie van

Open access

Valentin Seidler

programs. The Colonial Welfare and Development Act of 1940, for example, established the principle that the British taxpayers had a duty to contribute to the development of the colonial peoples. This was a new doctrine which also added an extra dimension to the idea of good government. It was no longer enough for serving officers to uphold law and order and collect taxes. The new development philosophy gave colonial officers an active role in preparing the colonial subjects for participation in the political and industrial life of the territory. Just like ›development

Open access

Caroline Dufour

that they were the most competent to carry out. They achieved a monopoly because they were the only ones able to exercise this form of symbolic power. Ibidem. Through their practices, agents of the administrative field produce documents – archives – that they use to legitimize both themselves and the state. For example, practices for collecting taxes, which administrative institutions depend on to exist and develop, are justified by being protected from the enemy. For these practices to be properly enforced, the state will use, if necessary, its symbolic force