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Nikolett Várhegyi and Péter Furkó

Abstract

The present paper approaches the theme of “understanding strangers” through discussing some of the methodological issues in interlanguage pragmatics (ILP), with special reference to Hungarian-English Interlanguage (IL) requests. Written discourse completion tasks (WDCT) were used to collect data from 20 English major university students. The CCSARP Project’s 9-scale request strategies table proposed by Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper (1989) was incorporated into the research, the proposed categories were extended by labels relating to mixed strategies and responses where no answers were provided. The structure of the paper is as follows: after a brief overview of the literature in the field of ILP with a special focus on WDCT, the validity of the methodology is highlighted through the discussion of issues relating to labelling/coding categories as well as interannotator (dis)agreements. By analysing and comparing utterances on the basis of our annotation output and validating the results with the aid of ReCal, we have confirmed that WDCT is a reliable and valid tool for testing ILP competence in speech acts performance.

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Julianna Ispánovics Csapó

. [From Dunghill to an Imaginary Museum: Mania for Collecting in Ottó Tolnai’s writings.] In Habitus, ed. Erzsébet Csányi, 39-47. Novi Sad: Bölcsészettudományi Kar, Vajdasági Magyar Felsőoktatási Kollégium. -. 2013. Érzelmes utazások a múzeumban. [Emotional Journeys in the Museum.] In Utazás - megértés - identitás [Journey - Understanding - Identity], ed. Erzsébet Csányi, 31-39. Novi Sad: Bölcsészettudományi Kar, Vajdasági Magyar Felsőoktatási Kollégium. Reuschel, Anne-Kathrin-Hurni, Lorenz. 2011. Mapping Literature: Visualisation of

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Maria Margaret Lopes

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Editor-in-chief Krystyna Kujawinska Courtney

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Miriam Junghans

Abstract

In the course of her career, German ornithologist Emilie Snethlage (1868-1929), who worked in Brazil in the early twentieth century, was involved in all the steps that characterize the “production” of a specimen for scientific collection: from fieldwork, with the collection and preparation of materials, to their description and publication of results. Each of these stages mobilizes different material practices and sociability networks. During fieldwork or in her museum activities, the fact of being a woman demanded from Snethlage specific strategies for establishing her scientific legitimacy, analyzed in this article, especially her activities related to collecting practices.

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Mariana M. O. Sombrio

Abstract

This paper will explore the significance of the expeditions under- taken by Wanda Hanke (1893-1958) in South America, of the networks she established in the region, as well as of her contributions to ethnological studies, in particular her compilation of extensive data and collections. Through Hanke's experience, it is possible to elucidate aspects of the history of ethnology and that of the history of museums in Brazil, as well as to emphasize the status of female participation in these areas. Wanda Hanke spent 25 years of her life studying the indigenous groups of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil and Paraguay and collecting ethnological objects for natural history museums. Trained in medicine and philosophy, she began to dedicate herself to ethnological studies in her forties, and she travelled alone, an uncommon characteristic among female scientists in the 1940s, in Brazil.

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Otakar Kirsch and Lucie Jagošová

Abstract

The aim of the presented study is to bring together almost fifteen years of the Centre for the Study of Museology of the Charles University’s Faculty of the Arts at the National Museum in Prague (herein - after referred to as the Centre), one of the most important contemporary methodological and educational centres in the field of museology. The subject of interest will gradually become an analysis of the factors and phenomena that led to its establishment in 1967, including the theoretical concept of the head of the Centre, Jiří Neustupný, which became the starting point for the final form of its curriculum. In addition to outlining the structure for the curriculum for the students of Charles University’s daily study and for the museum staff and introducing personalities who have participated in educational activities, the text also deals with its non-teaching activities (such as research and methodological activities, cooperation within both the domestic and the international museum organisations, while collecting and publishing museological literature). The work was created to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the museological centre which is recognised by international authorities and, as the first one, this work seeks to map its development.

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Jolana Tothová

Abstract

The Collection of the Working Class Movement Museum results from a fusion of three Prague museums – the Klement Gottwald Museum, the V. I. Lenin Museum and the Julius Fučík Museum, which were taken over and completed by the Working Class Movement Museum in 1990. For the reason of securing the completeness of the Collection, the Working Class Movement Museum donated it to the National Museum in 2014. The Collection of hundreds of thousands of items consists of collectibles (e.g. works of visual art, posters, military objects, flags and standards, honours and documents of social events and also photographic and film materials), archive records (some personal possessions of Klement Gottwald, Antonín Zápotocký, Julius and Gusta Fučík, a collection of the written materials and of the small prints and archives of the original museums) and library items (publications from the 19th and 20th centuries focused on the history of the social movements and the processes). This paper presents both the origins and the content of the Collection and summarises the process of its change of location and deposition and also the creation of the new concept regarding the treatment of the museum funds.

Open access

Ivan Lacko

American Review, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 625-640. Whitman, W. 1995. “Notes Left Over.” In: Specimen Days & Collect. Mineola, NY: Dover, pp. 313-338.