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Tomasz Łukaszuk and Mariusz Ferenc

Abstract

Resources of professional companies operating on the medical services market contain data from a huge number of transactional documents. This allows them to collect and process, among other actions, information about medical products. Organized data is obviously more valuable. In this paper, the possibility of supporting the process of organizing information is considered, with the goal to extract values of attributes of medical products from brief descriptions in transactional documents. This helps to build a structured product specification and makes it possible to make comparisons between products. For this purpose, an approach based on regular expressions and their generation with the use of the genetic algorithm is proposed. The results presented in the paper show a great potential of the presented method.

Open access

Maciej Górkiewicz and Izabela Chmiel

Abstract

With the aim of verifying the suitability of the CES-D scale for use in long-term care institutions for older adults, the CES-D questionnaire was used to collect patient-reported assessments, and two well-known psychometric instruments – the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Barthel Index of Abilities of Daily Living – were used to collect nurse-reported assessments, based on observations of patients’ behaviours. With regard to possible frequent cases of cognitive impairment and/or insufficient motivation to give sensible responses to CES-D questions, the patient-reported responses were collected from patients during one-on-one sessions with a nurse. The reliability, concurrent validity, and the trustworthiness of the obtained data were supported with proper values of the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, 0.70 < alpha < 0.85, with significant correlation between CES-D and HADS-Depression, R = 0.50, p < 0.001, and with significant correlation between scores of particular CES-D items vs. final CES-D evaluations of depression, proved by significance p < 0.001 for 18 of 20 CES-D items. These findings supported the effectiveness of the one-on-one session methodology in questionnaire surveys for older adults. The postulation that cases of self-reported depression included somewhat different information about the patient than nurse-reported depression concerning the same patient was supported with the evidence that, in spite of the significant correlation between the Barthel Index and HADS-Depression, R = −0.17, p = 0.016, and in spite of the significant correlation between CES-D and HADS-Depression, the correlation between the Barthel Index and CES-D, equal to R = −0.08 was insignificant at p = 0.244. The findings of this study, considered jointly, support the valuableness of the CES-D scale for use in one-on-one surveys for older adults.

Open access

Paweł Sowa, Bartosz Pędziński, Michalina Krzyżak, Dominik Maślach, Sylwia Wójcik and Andrzej Szpak

., & Tornetta, P. (2004). Internet versus mailed questionnaires: a controlled comparison. J Med Internet Res , 6(4), e39. Mider, D. (2013). Dylematy metodologiczne badań kultury politycznej w Internecie. Przegląd Politologiczny , 2, 23–24. Nulty, D. D. (2008). The adequacy of response rates to online and paper surveys: what can be done? Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education , 33(3), 301–314. Pealer, L. N., Weiler, R. M., Pigg, R. M., Miller, D., & Dorman, S. M. (2001). The feasibility of a web-based surveillance system to collect health risk

Open access

María Jiménez-Buedo and Federica Russo

Abstract

The advantage of examining causality from the perspective of modelling is thus that it puts us naturally closer to the practice of the sciences. This means being able to set up an interdisciplinary dialogue that contrasts and compares modelling practices in different fields, say economics and biology, medicine and statistics, climate change and physics. It also means that it helps philosophers looking for questions that go beyond the narrow ‘what-is-causality’ or ‘what-are-relata’ and thus puts causality right at the centre of a complex crossroad: epistemology/methodology, metaphysics, politics/ethics. This special issue collects nine papers that touch upon various scientific fields, from system biology to medicine to quantum mechanics to economics, and different questions, from explanation and prediction to the role of both true and false assumptions in modelling.