Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • Music, general x
Clear All
Open access

Łukasz Smoluch

Abstract

Henryk Oskar Kolberg (1814–1890), a musician, composer, the greatest Polish ethnographer and one of the fathers of European ethnomusicology, collected over 20,000 folk songs, dances, and instrumental melodies from the territory of today’s Poland, Belarus, Ukraine and other Slavic countries. The musical culture of the Hutsuls was an object of Oskar Kolberg’s interest in the late 1870s and early 1880s. The research material related to this region was collected by Kolberg, similarly as in other regions, from two different types of sources. The core of his work consisted of field notes written down during his few trips to that region. Another way of collecting information for Kolberg’s publication included an extensive study of already published resources – historical and ethnographical works, collections of songs, short articles, etc. Kolberg’s study of the musical culture of the Hutsuls is a very valuable source for the history of the culture of this part of Europe.

Open access

Anastasiya Niakrasava

Abstract

The article examines the subject of Belarusian musical and ethnographic materials collected by Oskar Kolberg. The materials on Belarusian folk culture, which were collected by the researcher throughout his whole life, were published almost 80 years after his death in Volume 52 Belarus–Polesie, while some of them are also to be found in Volume 53 Lithuania. Thus, the geography of these materials extends far beyond the borders of contemporary Belarus. However, individual regions of the country are not equally represented. Using the works of his predecessors, Kolberg compiled information about the culture and ethnography of Belarus and supplemented it with his own research. The author of this article divides the materials used to compile Volume 52 into two unequal groups: publications of other authors and the personal field notes of Kolberg (together with the materials sent to him by correspondents). The latter group, which constitutes more than a quarter of all the materials and is essential for assessing the Belarusian achievements of the Polish ethnographer, has been analysed in the article. The abundance of Kolberg’s own transcriptions of music in the volume makes his work into one of the key sources in 19th-century Belarusian musical historiography The author also puts forward a hypothesis concerning the Belarusian beginnings of Kolberg’s entire collecting activity.

Open access

Zenon Koter and Agata Kusto

Instrumenty muzyczne w prywatnych zbiorach muzyków ludowych na Lubelszczyźnie. Z badań nad tradycją muzyczną regionu

Open access

Piotr Majewski

Pojęcie metafory w języku polskiej krytyki artystycznej w drugiej połowie lat pięćdziesiątych XX wieku

Open access

Joanna Jemielnik

System wartości młodzieży kształcącej się muzycznie. Na przykładzie studentów Akademii Muzycznej w Łodzi i Wydziału Artystycznego UMCS

Open access

Ewa Letkiewicz

Recepcja antyku w biżuterii Europy u progu czasów nowożytnych

Open access

Michaela Freemanová

Abstract

Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) and his brother Michael (1737-1806) were the most popular composers in eighteenth-century Bohemia, and their compositions have been preserved in collections in Prague, among other places. The study deals with Haydniana in the collection of Ondřej Horník (1864-1917) kept at the National Museum - Czech Museum of Music and with sacred works in particular. It notes the performances of compositions by both Haydn brothers given by the Brothers Hospitallers in Kuks, gives concrete examples of changes to instrumentation depending on changing tastes during the period, and touches on cases of doubtful authorship and practical questions concerning the manufacturing and distribution of paper. Among other things, it affirms the importance of Ondřej Horník's activity as a collector.