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Open access

V. Repasi, A. Agostinelli, P. Nagy, M. Coiro, K. Hecker and F. Lamberti

Abstract

The distribution of species of the Xiphinema americanumgroup in Hungary was studied by collecting 272 samples from 53 localities. Samples have been taken from soil in the rhizosphere of 70 plant species. In total, 12.86 % of the samples contained at least one species from the Xiphinema americanum-group. Three species were found: Xiphinema brevicollum, X. pachtaicum and X. simile. Xiphinema brevicollum occurred in 4.41 %, X. pachtaicum in 3.67 % and X. simile in 4.77 % of the samples. New data on plants associated with the reported species and developmental patterns for X. brevicollum and X. pachtaicum are also presented.

Open access

Agnieszka Gryszczyńska, Bogna Opala, Zdzisław Łowicki, Anna Krajewska-Patan, Waldemar Buchwald, Bogusław Czerny, Sebastian Mielcarek, Dariusz Boroń, Anna Bogacz and Przemysław M. Mrozikiewicz

Summary

The aim of our study were qualitative and quantitative analyses of two polyphenolic acids: chlorogenic and gallic acids. These compounds were determined in two species of Rhodiola: R. kirilowii and R. rosea. After collecting plants, aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts were prepared. In order to identify analysed polyphenolic compounds ultra performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS, Waters) was used. Gallic acid is commonly found in the roots of these plants. Aqueous extract in both species is a rich source of gallic acid. The UPLC-MS/MS studies allow to use this analytical method for determination of polyphenolic acids accordance with the requirements of ICH. Chromatographic method developed by our team is more precise then previously published.

Open access

Cheng-bao Wang, Jian-jie Chen, Hong-ming Nie, Feng Gao, Hua Lv and Hong-ding Li

Abstract

Objective This study was undertaken to investigate the influencing factors on serum ALT level and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA titer in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients.

Methods All patients enrolled into this study were anti-HCV positive. Retrospective tracing method was applied to detect serum ALT level and HCV RNA titer and to collect general information of the patients such as genders, age groups, interferon medication history, infection pathways, height and weight. Then the multi-factor analysis was adopted with the application of binominal logistic regression mode.

Results The abnormal rate of ALT level was positively correlated to HCV RNA and gender while negatively correlated to interferon medication history and age group, with Wald value of the 4 factors as 39.604, 11.823, 18.991 and 7.389, respectively. The positive rate of HCV RNA was negatively correlated to interferon medication history and gender while positively correlated to ALT level, with corresponding Wald value of the 3 factors as 81.394, 7.618 and 27.562, respectively.

Conclusions The normal ALT level in HCV infected patients was associated with viral load, age, gender and interferon medication history, while the normal rate of HCV RNA titer was closely associated with gender, interferon medication history and ALT level.

Open access

Joanna Nawrot, Renata Dawid-Pać, Kinga Kaczerowska-Pietrzak, Maria Urbańska and Gerard Nowak

configuration. Collect Czech Chem Commun 1984; 48:637-641. 7. Tyson RL, Chang C, Laughlin JL, Ayenhchi y, Cassady JM. 9α-hydroxyparthenolide, a novel antitumor sesquiterpene lactone from Anvillea garcinii (Burm.) DC. Experientia 1981; 37:441-442. 8. Sattar E A, Galal A M, Mossa G S. Antitumor germacranolides from Anvillea garcinii. J Nat Prod 1996; 59:403-405. 9. Nowak G, Drożdż B, Budesinsky M, Holub M. Germacranolides in the genus Stizolophus Cass. Acta Soc Bot Pol 1986; 58:247-251. 10. Dittrich M, Petrak S

Open access

Mouna Ben Farhat, Rym Chaouch -Hamada and Ahmed Landoulsi

Summary

A comparative study of the oil yield and fatty acid composition of three Salvia species seeds collected in different locations has been conducted. Seed oil extraction was made using a Soxhlet-extractor and fatty acid analysis was undertaken using a GC-FID. The effect of the collecting site on oil yield, as well as the content of individual fatty acid and total fatty acid and fatty acid content was significant. Seed oil yield varied from 14.94 to 22.83% and the total fatty acids ranged from 67.36 to 82.49 mg/g DW. α-Linolenic (24.02-49.19%), linoleic (20.13-42.88%), oleic (12.97-17.81%) and palmitic (8.37-16.63%) acids were the most abundant fatty acids in all analyzed samples. α-Linolenic acid was found to be the major fatty acid in S. verbenaca and S. officinalis species, however, S. aegyptiaca was characterized by the prevalence of linoleic acid. Among the unsaturated fatty acids, which were represented in all samples in high amounts (78.16-89.34%), the polyunsaturated fatty acids (α-linolenic and linoleic acids) showed important levels ranging from 63.09 to 74.71%. Seeds of S. verbenaca were the richest in polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Open access

N. Sasanelli, T. D’Addabbo and M. Lišková

] Di Vito, M., Ekanayake, H.M.R.K., Savino, V. (1985): The effect of initial population densities of Xiphinema index on the growth of grapevine. Nematol. mediterr., 13: 185–189 [4] Hussey, R. S., Barker, K. R. (1973): A comparison of methods of collecting inocula of Meloidogyne spp. including a new technique. Plant Dis. Rep., 57: 1025–1028 [5] Katalan-Gateva, S.D., Choleva-Abadjeva, B. (1977): Gall-forming nematodes (genus Meloidogyne Goeldi, 1887) on the vine in the district of Blagoevgrad. Acta Zool. Bulg., 6

Open access

Katarzyna Bączek, Mirosław Angielczyk, Jarosław L. Przybył, Marcin Ejdys, Anna Geszprych and Zenon Węglarz

Summary

Southern sweet-grass (Hierochloë australis /Schrad./ Roem. & Schult., Poaceae), commonly known as a bison grass, is a perennial tuft grass rarely occurring in mixed forests in Eastern and Northern Europe. The raw material collected from this plant are leaves rich in coumarin compounds (especially coumarin) responsible for sweet, specific aroma of these organs. In Poland, southern sweet-grass leaves are used mainly for alcohol products aromatisation. Growing demand for the raw material results in uncontrolled and excessive collecting of this plant. The best way to solve this problem is to introduce this plant into cultivation. Since southern sweet-grass is allogamous and heterozigotic, strong intraspecific variability of the species is observed. Fourteen clones of selected individuals from one population of southern sweet-grass naturally occurring in East Poland were compared in respect of morphological traits as well as accumulation of biologically active compounds. The clones differed significantly in the weight of leaves (3.76-22.59 g of air-dry weight per plant). The total coumarin content (determined by a spectrophotometric method) in this raw material for investigated clones ranged from 1.49 to 1.94%, flavonoids - from 0.25 to 0.55%, and phenolic acids - from 0.20 to 0.42%. Three coumarin compounds were identified by HPLC, namely coumarin, 3,4-dihydrocoumarin, and o-coumaric acid. The content of coumarin ranged from 84.00 to 310.85, 3,4-dihydrocoumarin: from 17.80 to 168.45, and o-coumaric acid: from 37.50 to 70.00 mg · 100 g-1 dry matter.

Open access

F. Jahanshahi Afshar, N. Sasanelli, S. Hosseininejad and Z. Tanha Maafi

, S. A., Maafi, Z. T., Barooti, S. (1997). Nematodes associated with olive trees (Olea europea L.) in Iran. Appl. Entomol. and Phytopathol., 65(1): 46–53 [7] Hosseininejad, S. A., Ramezani Malakrodi, M. (2005). Reaction of olive cultivars to Meloidogyne javanica. Integrated Protection of Olive Crops IOBC/wprs Bull. 28(9): 141–145 [8] Hussey, R. S., Barker, K. R. (1973): A comparison of methods of collecting inocula of Meloidogyne spp. including a new technique. Plant Dis. Rep., 57: 1025

Open access

T. D’Addabbo, I. Papajová, N. Sasanelli, V. Radicci and M. Renčo

–43 [12] Hu, C., Qi, Y.C. (2010): Abundance and diversity of soil nematodes as influenced by different types of organic manure. Helminthologia, 47: 58–66, DOI: 10.2478/s11687-010-0009-8 http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/s11687-010-0009-8 [13] Hussey, R. S., Barker, K. R. (1973): A comparison of methods of collecting inocula of Meloidogyne spp. including a new technique. Plant Dis. Reptr., 57: 1025–1028 [14] Kimpinski, J., Gallant, C. E., Henry, R., Macleod, J. A., Sanderson, J. B., Sturz, A. V. (2003): Effect of compost and

Open access

L. Maistrello, G. Vaccari and N. Sasanelli

–70 [19] Hussey, R.S., Barker, K.S. (1973): A comparison of methods of collecting inocula of Meloidogyne spp. including a new technique. Plant Dis. Reptr., 57: 1025–1028 [20] Isman, M. B. (2000): Plant essential oils for pest and disease management. Crop Prot., 19: 603–608 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0261-2194(00)00079-X [21] Janssen, A. M., Sheffer, J. J. C., Baerheim Svendsen, A. (1987): Antimicrobial activity of essential oils: a 1976–1986 literature review: Aspects of the test methods. Planta Med., 53: 395–398 http