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Miloš Černý and Michael von Tschirnhaus

Abstract

New faunistic data on the distribution of 50 species of the family Agromyzidae from the Afrotropical Region are given. Chromatomyia syngenesiae Hardy, 1849 and Phytomyza ranunculi (Schrank, 1803) are firstly recorded for the Afrotropics and 47 species are firstly recorded for the following countries: Angola, Cameroon, Cape Verde Islands, Central African Republic, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. For each country the number of known species are put together in a table. An updated Afrotropical checklist is added. The most peculiar genitalia of the redetected Ophiomyia dhofarensis are discussed in connection with other species, among them: Ophiomyia yunnanensis comb. nov. [= Ophiomyia dumosa syn. nov.]. Ophiomyia nigrimaculata comb. nov. is treated taxomically, too. The type-species of the Pseudonapomyza acanthacearum-group is re-defined. Ranunculus was firstly confirmed as host plant genus of Phytomyza subeximia which develops between its seeds, a rare substrate in the genus. Napomyza strana stat. rev. was redetected in an altitude of 3353 m a.s.l. An eclector collecting method is described which lets estimate the natural proportional abundance of Agromyzidae compared with all other Diptera in the groundlevel vegetation of a country.

Open access

International Agrophysics

The Journal of Institute of Agrophysics of Polish Academy of Sciences

Open access

Dariusz Mikielewicz and Paweł Szymański

Abstract

The combat potential of future warships will be directly related to the use of modern electronic devices being parts of advanced systems, such as, for instance, radar systems, fire aiming systems, fire detection systems, electric drive systems, and even electronic and radio-electronic weaponry, railguns and lasers, installed on these warships. The capacity and functionality of these devices is continually increasing, at decreasing mass and dimensions, which results in higher power consumption. Heat collection becomes a growing problem in operation of these devices.

The paper presents a concept of the use of the CPL (Capillary Pumped Loop) cycle for passive heat collection from precise electronic devices used on warships. It also includes the description of the experimental rig and discussion of the results of laboratory tests performed on this rig and confirmed using the mathematical model developed by the authors.

Open access

Evsel Denizhan, Wiktoria Szydło and Anna Skoracka

Abstract

Although the geographical location and botanical history of Turkey make the country a perfect place for a potentially rich diversity of eriophyoid mites, little is known about the Turkish eriophyoid fauna. The current paper is a brief review of the existing records of eriophyoid mites found so far in Turkey, with additional information on 6 grass-associated eriophyoid species recorded recently. The 134 eriophyoid species collected in Turkey come from only ca. 1.2% of all Turkish plant species. The role of collecting ecological and molecular data and studying economically significant eriophyoid mites species in this area is particularly stressed.

Open access

Jenő Nagy

Abstract

In 2017 the European Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) was voted to be the “bird of the year” in Hungary. This is a partially migrant species; most of the European populations are resident, however, its breeding range extends to East from the Sweden-Poland-Moldova axis towards the Yenisei with some of the populations wintering in Kazakhstan and South of Turkey. The European Goldfinch is classified within the Carduelinae subfamily including approximately a hundred species. Several taxonomic changes were introduced in this group during the last fifteen years, however, we still do not understand much of their origin and evolutionary history. My aim in this paper is to collect existing knowledge on the phylogeny and evolution of the Carduelinae finches and their allies, with a particular focus on the European Goldfinch and its closest relatives. Furthermore, here I point out uncertainties in different phylogenetic sources of finches, which careful consideration can be useful in similar evolutionary studies. Finally, I summarise some vision for future research.

Open access

Piotr Skubała

Abstract

Oribatid fauna highly varies among habitats, but different microhabitats within a habitat are also characterized by different mite species. The main goal of the research was to compare the observed structure of an oribatid community when samples were collected at random from the soil-litter layer of 0-10 cm in depth (standard approach) and selectively from 6 types of available microhabitats (complex approach). Samples were taken within a small plot (10 m × 10 m) in a forested area of the Silesian Park (Chorzów, south Poland). Overall, 2642 specimens of Oribatida belonging to 62 species were collected in 66 samples. The structure of the oribatid community observed by means of the 2 sampling approaches was completely different. The abundance and species richness of oribatid mites collected from 6 microhabitats were significantly higher than in the soil-litter layer alone. Results of this study show that random collecting of only soil-litter samples may reduce the evaluation of species richness in a study area by 40%. Each of the studied microhabitats supported a peculiar oribatid fauna.

Open access

Wojciech Czarniawski and Rafał Gosik

The snake-flies (Neuropteroidea: Raphidioptera) of Lublin agglomeration

The first records about occurrence of snake-flies near Lublin (Inocelia crassicornis) were published by Dziędzielewicz (8). Since 1891, in the period of more than one century, in all Lublin region, only about 60 individuals, belonging to 5 species were caught. The recent researches were conducted during two seasons on 12 localities, which represented the most typical urban plant communities in Lublin agglomeration. In effect 62 specimens of snake-flies, belonging to 5 species were collected, using such methods as an entomological scoop, entomological umbrella, sticky traps and collecting by "picking out." The best effectiveness was acquired by application of the sticky traps.

Open access

Nick Dixon and Edward J. A. Drewitt

Abstract

Until relatively recently Peregrines have been regarded as a rural bird. As their populations have increased over the past 20 years, Peregrines have increasingly become urban birds. One of the earliest locations to be occupied by Peregrines in the UK was on a church in Exeter, in the county of Devon. Over the past 20 years we have studied their diet, collecting prey remains on a regular basis. The results reveal that Feral Pigeons Columba livia comprise one third of the diet by frequency and just over half of the diet when measured by mass. The remainder of the diet comprises a wealth of other species including wading birds, other doves and pigeons, ducks, gulls and terns, and rails. A selection of species eaten by the Peregrines reveal that they are hunting at night, taking certain wading birds, rails and grebes, that would be difficult to catch by day and are known to migrate at night. This study is the most comprehensive to date and reveals that while the Feral Pigeon is an important part of the diet, contrary to public opinion, it is by no means the only species that Peregrines eat. In fact, the remaining half of the diet, by mass, comprised 101 other species of bird and three species of mammal. Such dietary studies help dispel myths about peregrines feeding habits and ensure that their conservation and protection is based on evidence.

Open access

Zoltán Vas, Csaba Privigyei, Viola Judit Prohászka, Tibor Csörgő and Lajos Rózsa

Abstract

A recently published checklist of Hungarian louse fauna (Insecta: Phthiraptera) listed 279 species and subspecies which have been recorded in Hungary. According to that checklist several louse species still await detection in Hungary, and many of the previously reported louse species have not been found on all expected host species yet. Our faunistical survey on avian lice started in 2005 at Ócsa Bird Ringing Station, resulting hundreds of ectoparasite samples collected from over 70 bird species. Additionally, our louse collection has grown by collecting samples in other research projects focusing on various bird species, and by sampling cadavers before taxidermy in the Bird Collection of the Hungarian Natural History Museum. As the results of a preliminary exploration of this collection, we list 20 louse species which are new to the Hungarian fauna, as well as the first Hungarian records of 17 host-parasite associations. We also found 3 louse-bird association records new for the World fauna.

Open access

Anna Spalona

Abstract

This paper investigates the awareness of visitors to Bieszczady National Park (BNP) and Tatra National Park (TNP) of human influence on brown bears (Ursus arctos Linnaeus, 1758), i.e. what causes human-habituated bears to become food-conditioned. In the parks studied, 928 questionnaires were collected in July and August 2007. The survey was supplemented with data on the amount of garbage collected in both parks by municipal services in 2007. Respondents in BPN displayed significantly greater knowledge about the causes of human-food conditioning of bears than respondents in TNP (64.2% and 52.7%, respectively, had more than the average of 3.54 correct answers per 5 questions in the questionnaire). As many as 60.1% of visitors in both parks incorrectly associated human-food conditioning with a lack of natural food and 34.4% withan excessive number of bears. Most respondents did not realise that to prevent human-bear conflict, decisive actions must be taken towards every food conditioned bear observed in the free-living population. Unlike in BNP, in TNP there is a large amount of rubbish left by visitors along trails. In 2007, municipal services collected in both parks a similar amount of garbageper 1000 visitors (0.39 m3 and 0.37 m3 in BNP and TNP, respectively) but the annual number of visitors is nearly 8‑fold lower inBNP than in TNP. In BNP, only visitors put rubbish in containers, while in TNP, additional 6 cleaning companies are employed to collect rubbish thrown by visitors along trails. In contrast to TNP, however, in BNP there are no bear-proof containers. Both parks need to prevent the access of bears to rubbish. It is also advisable to initiate an effective information campaign among visitors about prevention of human-food conditioning of bears.