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Open access

Miloš Černý and Michael von Tschirnhaus

Abstract

New faunistic data on the distribution of 50 species of the family Agromyzidae from the Afrotropical Region are given. Chromatomyia syngenesiae Hardy, 1849 and Phytomyza ranunculi (Schrank, 1803) are firstly recorded for the Afrotropics and 47 species are firstly recorded for the following countries: Angola, Cameroon, Cape Verde Islands, Central African Republic, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. For each country the number of known species are put together in a table. An updated Afrotropical checklist is added. The most peculiar genitalia of the redetected Ophiomyia dhofarensis are discussed in connection with other species, among them: Ophiomyia yunnanensis comb. nov. [= Ophiomyia dumosa syn. nov.]. Ophiomyia nigrimaculata comb. nov. is treated taxomically, too. The type-species of the Pseudonapomyza acanthacearum-group is re-defined. Ranunculus was firstly confirmed as host plant genus of Phytomyza subeximia which develops between its seeds, a rare substrate in the genus. Napomyza strana stat. rev. was redetected in an altitude of 3353 m a.s.l. An eclector collecting method is described which lets estimate the natural proportional abundance of Agromyzidae compared with all other Diptera in the groundlevel vegetation of a country.

Open access

Lars Söderström, Anders Hagborg, Matt von Konrat and Ana Séneca

Abstract

The first ever liverwort and hornwort checklist is provided for Paraguay. Despite the high level of biological diversity in Paraguay, there remain very few intensive collecting efforts for liverworts and hornworts in the region since the late 1800’s. We report 2 hornwort taxa and 71 liverwort taxa. The list is based on almost 100 literature references, including monographs, regional studies, and molecular investigations. Given the dramatic loss of habitats in Paraguay coupled with high species diversity in other organisms, further collecting of liverworts and hornworts is critical. There is also the potential to use historical records with contemporary collections to investigate the impact of habitat loss in the area.

Open access

Felix Odemero Achoja

Abstract

Increasing concern about the problem of risk associated with poultry business has highlighted the need for its comprehensive understanding. A clear knowledge of financial risk in broiler enterprise will pave the way to efficient mitigation strategies among broiler producers. This study investigates financial risk programming, and threshold analysis in broiler enterprises in Delta State, Nigeria. Probabilistic (multi-stage) sampling procedure was adopted in selecting 200 broiler farmers for the study. Structured questionnaire was used to collect 6 years time series data (2004-2009) from the respondents. Collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, QSB version of linear programming model, and threshold model. The results of the study showed that broiler enterprise is profitable with optimum net profit of N47,925 and N357,558 per small scale and large scale producers, respectively. An optimum profit of N389.9 per bird was earned by broiler producers. The output of QSB version of linear programming showed that at the stocking rate of 20, 692 birds, financial risk is optimized at 15%. The threshold regression model revealed that the broiler enterprise in the study area generally operated below the risk threshold. Simple regression indicated that expected return is positively and significantly (P < 0.05) related with financial risk. Incorporating financial risk as a constraint in the broiler farm plan is a useful contribution that will enhance efficient farm planning. The optimal return and financial risk threshold provided in this study will improve the confidence level of stakeholders in poultry industry such as current and potential investors, insurance institution and institutional lenders. This will translate to growth in the broiler subsector of the poultry industry in Delta State

Open access

Babatunde Mathew Matanmi, Olaitan Afolabi, Sola Emmanuel Komolafe and Lawal Lateef Adefalu

Abstract

This research was conducted to assess the impact of Root and Tuber Expansion Programme (RTEP) in Kwara State, Nigeria. This impact was examined through a comparative study of project beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries, namely, their personal characteristics, economic characteristics and statistical difference between socio-economic characteristics of respondents. A total of one hundred and sixty (160) respondents were selected using a simple random sampling technique. These consisted of eighty (80) RTEP beneficiaries and eighty (80) Non-beneficiaries. Structured interview schedule was used to collect the data. Descriptive and inferential statistical tools such as frequency counts and percentages and t-test were used to analyse the data. The results of the analysis show that most RTEP beneficiaries (43.75 %) and non-RTEP beneficiaries (31.25 %) processors were within the age range of 41 - 50 years. RTEP beneficiaries (51.3 %) produced higher quantity of gari (a West African food made from cassava tubers) above 500 kg per month and hence higher amount of money spent in purchasing cassava tubers as compared to the non-RTEP beneficiaries (3.75 %) counterparts. Our findings further show that there were significant differences between the quantity of gari produced (t-value = 8.832 at P < 0.05) and the total monthly income (t-value = 7.475 at P < 0.05). It was concluded that the project has impacted positively on the beneficiaries through improved productivity and income generation. To reduce the high cost of purchasing cassava tubers to process into gari, this study suggests that extension agents through the RTEP programme should encourage and train gari processors to engage in cultivation of cassava.

Open access

Martins Olusegun Orifah, Messiah Chijioke Ijeoma, Alfred Ehizua Ehien, Ado Nasiru and Olushola Samuel Fadairo

Abstract

Various health challenges and fatalities in rural communities of most developing countries of the world have been traceable to the unabated use of biomass energy sources. We therefore assessed the awareness of the health implications of the use of biomass energy sources among women in rural households of Jigawa State. Multistage sampling procedure was used to collect data from 120 respondents using structured questionnaires. Data were collected on respondents’ socioeconomic characteristics, types of biomass used, information sources on the health implications from use of biomass energy sources, awareness of the health implications and constraints to the use of alternatives to biomass. Data were summarised using frequencies, percentages, means, Chi-square and Pearson Product Moment Correlation. Majority of the respondents (78.3 %) were below 40 years of age with a mean age of 30 ± 2.02 years. Majority were married (90.8 %), Muslims (100 %), involved in agro-processing (65.8 %), had no formal education (73.3 %), and earned not more than ₦10, 000 (90.8 %) with mean household size of 9 members. Wood (100 %) and charcoal (100 %) were the dominant biomass energy sources used. Respondents’ main source of information on the health implications of the use of biomass were radio (64.2 %) and extension agents (54.2 %). Awareness level of the health implications from the use of biomass energy sources was fairly high (51.7 %). High cost of the alternatives, scarcity of refilling points and alternatives and lack of capital were the main hindrances to the use of the alternatives to biomass energy sources. The result on the inferential statistics revealed that a significant association existed between education (χ2 = 6.08; P < 0.05) and awareness of health implications from the use of biomass. Efforts should be made to sensitize women on the health implications resulting from the use of biomass. Alternatives should be made available and affordable to encourage a switch from biomass energy sources thereby reducing the fatalities that may result from its continual use.

Open access

Bruce Allen

: 221-225. Thériot I. 1928. Mexican mosses collected by Brother Arsène Brouard - II. Smithsonian Misc. Collect. 81 (1): 1-26. Williams R. S. 1916. Peruvian Mosses. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 43 : 323-334.

Open access

Edit Nagy Pintérné and Zoltán Pödör

.] Mezőgazdasági Kiadó, Budapest. 280 p. S ower , L.L. – S horey , H. H. – G aston , L.K. (1970): Sex pheromones of noctuid moth. XXI. Light: dark cycle regulation and light inhibition of sex pheromone release by females of Trichoplusia ni. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 63: 1090–1092. S terry , P. – M ackay , A. (2004): Lepkék. [Butterflies] Dorling Kindersley Book, London 2004 T óthmérész , B (1997): Diverzitási rendezések. Scienta Kiadó, Budapest. 98 p.(in Hungarian) W alker , A.K. – G albreath , R.A. (1979): Collecting insects at

Open access

Katarina Wedelsbäck Bladh, Kerstin M. Olsson and Flemming Yndgaard

: Collecting horseradish ( Armoracia rusticana, Brassicaceae ): local uses and morphological characterization in Basilicata (Southern Italy). - Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 59(5): 889-899. Sones K., Heaney R.K., Fenwick G.R., 1984: The glucosinolate content of UK vegetables - cabbage ( Brassicae oleracea ), swede ( B. napus ) and turnip ( B. campestris ). - Food Additives and contaminants, 1(3): 289-296. Sones K., Heaney R.K., Fenwick G.R., 1984b: Glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables. Analysis of Twenty-seven Cauliflower

Open access

International Agrophysics

The Journal of Institute of Agrophysics of Polish Academy of Sciences

Open access

Denis Loustau, Nuria Altimir, Mireille Barbaste, Bert Gielen, Sara Marańón Jiménez, Katja Klumpp, Sune Linder, Giorgio Matteucci, Lutz Merbold, Marteen Op de Beek, Patrice Soulé, Anne Thimonier, Caroline Vincke and Peter Waldner

Abstract

The nutritional status of plant canopies in terms of nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) exerts a strong influence on the carbon cycle and energy balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, in order to account for the spatial and temporal variations in nutritional status of the plant species composing the canopy, we detail the methodology applied to achieve consistent time-series of leaf mass to area ratio and nutrient content of the foliage within the footprint of the Integrated Carbon Observation System Ecosystem stations. The guidelines and defi-nitions apply to most terrestrial ecosystems.