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Open access

Aman Than Oo and Arun Patil

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Quality assurance is a key element of engineering education at Deakin University and is monitored through various mechanisms which also include the process of collecting students’ feedback within the Schools and faculties. The information received are then looked at holistically and action plan is developed to implement. This has proven to be very effective to ensure feedback received from the students has been properly addressed.

PURPOSE

The School of Engineering at Deakin University, has initiated the formation of Engineering Educational Quality Working Group (QWG). The aim of QWG is to provide a focal point for learning and teaching quality and its assurance in undergraduate and postgraduate Engineering courses. The school approach complements Deakin University processes of collecting and analysing student feedback on unit curricula design, delivery and facilitator delivery performance; feedback regarding individual facilitator, unit evaluations and graduate course experiences.

DESIGN/METHOD

The data are collected through face to face feedback from both on and off campus students. Feedback received from the end of trimester student evaluation process was also analysed.

RESULTS

The motivation behind the practise is to close the loop for the feedback received from the students and take appropriate action against the feedback. This is to enhance overall delivery of engineering education at Deakin University.

CONCLUSIONS

This paper outlines the activities planned by the QWG and elaborates on quality assurance approaches and key strategies to be implemented by the working group to achieve the desired quality as well as efficacy of those recommendations/actions undertaken at the school level.

Open access

Huiting Xing and Yun Liu

Abstract

The intense employment environment causes some college students to start their own business, arousing people's hot debate on entrepreneurship education. Through reading a large number of documents and collecting mass data, this paper analyzes the current situation of entrepreneurship education in China: the gap between entrepreneurial education and professional education, the discrepancy between the number of people who intend to start a business and that of those who hold on to it, the inadequate discipline construction of the entrepreneurship education, etc, making the in-depth analysis of the causes and putting forward the countermeasures for the development of entrepreneurship education in colleges and universities from three aspects of society, colleges and universities, and individuals.

Open access

Gabriel Dima

Abstract

EU-USR project (http://www.eu-usr.eu) was conceived as a response to the policy priority of the European Commission about the need for a common social responsibility strategy for all European universities. In this context, the EU-USR project creates a European model to enhance social responsibility of universities in a long-term perspective. To this end, the project uses a bottom-up approach by collecting examples of good practice from across Europe and using these to help inform the development, piloting and validation of a set of completely new benchmark standards. These standards are providing a Common Reference Framework for University Social Responsibility across the European Higher Education Area that is consistent with USR being a Core Competence of European universities by covering the following four areas: Research, Teaching, Support for Learning and Public Engagement.

Open access

Adrian Besimi and Visar Shehu

Abstract

Surveys represent popular, traditional tools for collecting data from users. They have been especially popular with the growth of convenient electronic delivery methods, through email, electronic forms and especially because of the ability to distribute them quickly through social networks. In the past years, South East European University has been relying a lot on surveys for the purpose of evaluating the quality of service offered by the university to its students. Through these surveys, the university has obtained a large amount of data which is used as an invaluable feedback tool from students and contributes to the improvement of the quality of service of the university. This paper aims to investigate the possibility of applying advanced statistical methods against these datasets with the purpose of uncovering hidden information and providing the office of Quality Assurance with a variety of methods that will aid the process of evaluating staff members.

Open access

Mirela Danubianu and Dragos Mircea Danubianu

Abstract

Speech therapy can be viewed as a business in logopaedic area that aims to offer services for correcting language. A proper treatment of speech impairments ensures improved efficiency of therapy, so, in order to do that, a therapist must continuously learn how to adjust its therapy methods to patient's characteristics. Using Information and Communication Technology in this area allowed collecting a lot of data regarding various aspects of treatment. These data can be used for a data mining process in order to find useful and usable patterns and models which help therapists to improve its specific education. Clustering, classification or association rules can provide unexpected information which help to complete therapist's knowledge and to adapt the therapy to patient's needs.

Open access

Ioana Gabriela Marcut and Stefania Kifor

Abstract

The professional standards for teachers provide the competences needed for this occupation, in function of the level of education and of the career stages. This study aims to discover the most important training factors which contribute to the acquisition of teacher competences and to establish the implications for teacher education. We have used a mixed-method design as the procedure for collecting, analyzing, and combining both quantitative and qualitative data. To detect the main agents in the teacher competences’ achievement, we applied a questionnaire and we asked the personal opinion of the teachers regarding their evolution in the career. The findings indicated that the principal factor was the individual study, followed by the continuing professional development, through training courses, the collaborative learning, and, almost on the last place, the initial teacher education. Implications for teacher education: the changes in the future are incalculable, so we have to rethink the teacher education to ensure future teachers able to learn and adapt themselves to different conditions. We appreciate the recommendations to reform teacher education in the context of lifelong learning very useful (Dolan, 2012) and we will study the applicability of them in our university.

Open access

Iuliana Antonie, Mirela Stanciu Cărătuş, Maria Tănase, Petronela Pavel and Monica Găureanu

Abstract

The fortified church in Guşteriţa got its final shape during the 16th century. During more recent times it became a leisure park and then a vegetable garden named “The Prioress Garden”. Nowadays there is developing an agricultural-educational experiment having an original character. The main idea of the experiment is the educational one in the idea of knowing the practice of an agriculture based on ecological concepts and also adding the concept of the biodynamic. The specific aims are: identifying the general measures of prevention and reduction of the attack of the pests and finding ways in order to maintaining the population of the invertebrates under the pest limit. The evaluation and classification of the invertebrates/insects was done in accordance with their food. The specific methods applied in the field were: the observation upon the elements of the biocoenocis, collecting of the biological material directly from the plants. In the lab, on the base of the determinatives there were identified the beneficial and pest invertebrates fauna. The result of the researches emphasizes that a biological, modern and profitable gardening is based on the living component in the cultivated ecosystems which reduces the pest populations, proving the beneficial role for the man.

Open access

Daniela Pasnicu and Gabriela Tudose

and EUROSTAT, The Measurement of Scientific and Technological Activities, Oslo Manual Guidelines for Collecting and Interpreting Innovation Data , 3rd edition. (2005). 6. OECD, Frascati Manual - The Measurement of Scientific and Technological Activities: Proposed Standard for Surveys of Research and Experimental Development , 6th edition Paris, France, (2002b) 7. Toner, Phillip, Workforce Skills and Innovation , OECD Education Working Papers, nr 55, pp. 23, (2011). 8. Wilthagen, T, Flexicurity- A new paradigm for labour market policy reform , pp. 92

Open access

Stelian Brad and Emilia Brad

Abstract

Designing courses for emerging areas of study is subject to clear challenges. If the envisaged courses are directly paid by the students – as it is the case of this research – they are actually the customers whose requirements have to be satisfied. Traditional approaches for collecting student requirements are not feasible for building up very novel topics. For such cases, an approach for course unit design that respects the lean philosophy is introduced in this paper. Lean is about creation of more value for students with fewer resources; or maximizing value while minimizing waste. The approach is based on the paradigm that, in highly dynamic and strong competitive educational markets, top quality courses must be designed from the very early stages. A hypothesis-based process defines the “content-prototype” of the course, which is further tested via web-based surveys that are directed to potential students. Results are statistically interpreted and a refined course content is formulated. The prototype for the most delicate module of the course is elaborated to test the level of delight of potential students (also called the WOW effect). Lessons learned are then considered to design the “promoter-prototype” of the course. A focus group is then used to test if potential students will feel a special experience interacting with the course content (also known as the KANDO effect). The methodology was experimented to design a master course unit on digital entrepreneurship. Empirical researches reveal the viability of the methodology to extract the appropriate topics of a course in emerging areas of study. Researches also show that a well-piloted strategy for course delivery should be in place to achieve the desired market impact.

Open access

Ioan Moise Achim, Teodora Popescu and Manuella Kadar

Technological Change , Blackwell Publishers, Oxford (UK)/Cambridge (US), (1995). 13. Nelson, R. (ed.), National Innovation Systems. A Comparative Analysis , Oxford University Press, New York/Oxford, (1993). 14. OECD, The Knowledge-Based Economy , Paris: OECD, (1996). 15. OECD, National Innovation Systems , Paris: OECD, (1997). 16. OECD, Frascati Manual. Proposed standard practice for surveys on research and experimental development , Paris: OECD, (2002). 17. OECD & EUROSTAT, Oslo manual. Guidelines for collecting and interpreting Innovation data . 3 rd ed