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Open access

Michaela Freemanová

Abstract

Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) and his brother Michael (1737-1806) were the most popular composers in eighteenth-century Bohemia, and their compositions have been preserved in collections in Prague, among other places. The study deals with Haydniana in the collection of Ondřej Horník (1864-1917) kept at the National Museum - Czech Museum of Music and with sacred works in particular. It notes the performances of compositions by both Haydn brothers given by the Brothers Hospitallers in Kuks, gives concrete examples of changes to instrumentation depending on changing tastes during the period, and touches on cases of doubtful authorship and practical questions concerning the manufacturing and distribution of paper. Among other things, it affirms the importance of Ondřej Horník's activity as a collector.

Open access

Ágnes Veszelszki

Abstract

Fake news texts often show clear signs of the deceptive nature; still, they are shared by many users on Facebook. What could be the reason for this? The paper tries to answer the question by collecting the linguistic and non-linguistic characteristics of fake news. Linguistic characteristics include among others the exaggerating, sensational title, the eye-catching, tabloid-style text, the correct or incorrect use of terms, and the fake URLs imitating real websites; non-linguistic characteristics are expressive pictures often featuring celebrities, the use of all caps, excessive punctuation, and spelling mistakes. The corpus was compiled using snowball sampling: manipulative news not originating from big news portals were collected from the social networking website Facebook. The aim of the study is to identify the characteristics of Hungarian fake news in comparison to the English ones and to elaborate a system of aspects which help identify fake news.

Open access

Patrizia Magnoler and Mariachiara Pacquola

Abstract

The need to address generational change and the challenges of a global market in terms of maintaining productivity require small and medium enterprises, mainly of an artisanal nature, to rethink training. The challenges mainly concern production capacity, which is increasingly problematic given that demand does not allow for long-term schedules and enhancement of human resources. There are many tensions and just as many needs for improvement, and training is therefore the space in which to collect and rework in order to restore a new perspective of sustainable and quality change.

This study presents a process of collaboration between universities and businesses, in which the former provide the framework for the activation of mechanisms that make use of work analysis, while the latter provide the appropriate support (time and opportunities for discussion) to allow for a review of the proposed training model and trainer functions in a dynamic and complex production environment.

Open access

Laura Fedeli

Abstract

Peer review is a consolidated procedure in the academic context and its process affects various range of research outputs from project funding applications to manuscript publication. Peer review can be developed through modalities that imply a different level of transparency in the relationship between anonymity of the author and the reviewer/s.

With the development of social media and the growth of scientific online communities, new forms of peer review have acquired a recognised value, matching the need of the academy to rely on selected reviewers and the need of the prospective author to get a richer feedback from a variety of scholars through different means, open comments and/or discussion fora, and always accessible online.

Hybrid forms of review, which can integrate a formal peer review with an open comment opportunity on the Web, proved successful for both improving the author’s draft and enhancing its chances of publication and for the reviewers who can use this valuable activity to enrich their reputation by collecting and showing their reviews as research output. In this framework, quality, transparency and reputation acquire new nuances in their connection with the process of research validation.

Open access

Floriana Falcinelli and Cristina Gaggioli

Abstract

The introduction of new technologies, video in particular, in educational and pedagogical research has not only changed how research is conducted in the educational field but has also brought about significant changes in teacher training. The advent of digitalisation, along with the miniaturisation of both video cameras and storage media, has led to a dramatic increase in the use of video, particularly in terms of video production. This has led to the introduction of new teaching practices and new training initiatives derived from the analysis of these practices. The use of video, at an educational and didactic level on the one hand, and as an instrument for field observation on the other, offers a variety of benefits, along with some critical issues. One of the advantages is the capacity to allow for an analytical vision of complex actions, which may be reviewed at different times, by a variety of interlocutors. The aim of this study is to present a reflection based on research conducted in nine digital classes, focussing on the use of video as both an instrument for recording, collecting and analysing data, as well as a training tool in the didactic practice of teachers.

Open access

Eddie Duggan

References Banerji, R. (2013). “Unlocking the Scrolls of Heculaneum”. In: BBC News Magazine. [Online; posted 20 December 2013]. url: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25106956. Barford, P. (2012). “Brothel Token from London?” In: Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues. [Blog Post] Jan 6 [available online]. url: http://paul-barford.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/brothel-tokenfrom-london.html. Beard, M. (n.d.). “A Don’s life: A Roman brothel token?” In: Times Literary Supplement. [Blog Post] Jan 5 [available

Open access

Michele Baldassarre

.org/stat/platform/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=99484307 Van Rijmenam, M. (2014) Think Bigger: Developing a Successful Big Data Strategy for Your Business, New York: AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn. Ward, J.S., Barker, A., (2013). Undefined by data: a survey of big data definitions. arXiv preprint arXiv:1309.5821. Retrieved from https://arxiv.org/abs/1309.5821v1 Wu, M (2012), The Big Data Fallacy And Why We Need To Collect Even Bigger Data, Techrunch, Retrieved from https://techcrunch.com/2012/11/25/the