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PAINTING THE SKY BLACK

Louis Kahn and the Architectonization of Nature

Florian Sauter

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Genealogy, Archive, Image

Interpreting Dynastic History in Western India, c. 1090-2016

Jayasinhji Jhala

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Genealogy, Archive, Image

Interpreting Dynastic History in Western India, c.1090-2016

Angma Jhala and Jayasinhji Jhala

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Dynamics of Architecture in Late Baroque Rome

Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni at the Cancelleria

Edward Olszewski

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Chassica Kirchhoff

Abstract

The Thun-Hohenstein album, long-known as the Thun’sche Skizzenbuch, is a bound collection of 112 drawings that visualize armoured figures at rest and in combat, as well as empty armours arrayed in pieces. The collection gathers drawings that span the period from the 1470s to around 1590. While most of the images were executed in Augsburg during the 1540s, the album’s three oldest drawings date to the late-fifteenth century. Two of these works, which form a codicological interlude between the first and second quires, find parallels in the illustrations of contemporaneous martial treatises. This article traces the pictorial lineages of these atextual images through comparative analyses of fight books produced in the German-speaking lands, and considers how the representational strategies deployed in martial treatises inflected the ways that book painters and their audiences visualized the armoured body. This exploration situates a manuscript from which one of the drawings derives, Peter Falkner’s Art of Knightly Defense, now in Vienna, within the Augsburg book painters’ workshops that would later give rise to the Thun album. Finally, this study considers how the transmission and representation of martial knowledge in late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century Augsburg contributed to the later depictions of armoured bodies that populate the album.

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Mieke Bal and Rachel E. Burke

. Flaubert, Gustave. Madame Bovary. Trans. Paul de Man (based on the version by Eleanor Marx Aveling, 1886). New York: Norton, 1965. Print. Itten, Johannes. The Elements of Color: A Treatise of the Color System of Johannes Itten, Based on His Book “The Art of Color.” Ed. Faber Birren. Trans. Ernst van Hagen. Chichester: Wiley, 1970. Print. LaCapra, Dominic. Madame Bovary on Trial . Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1982. Print. Lowenthal, David. The Past is a Foreign Country. New York: Cambridge UP, 1985. Print. Owesen, Ingeborg. “Edvard Munch Between

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Amin Karimnia and Fatemeh Mohammad Jafari

References Ashki, M., & Hosseini, M. (1997). English for the students of visual arts (painting, graphics, sculpture). Tehran: SAMT publication. Azarnoosh, M., & Ganji, M. (2014). ESP book evaluation: The case of management course book. International Journal of Secondary Education, 2(4), 61-65. Basturkmen, H. (2010). Developing courses in English for specific purposes. London, UK: Palgrave. Chamberlin, D., & Baumgardner, R. J. (1988). ESP in the classroom: Practice and evaluation. London: Modern

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Lavinia Hulea

References Altick, R. 1985. Painting from Books: Art and Literature in Britain, 1760-1900 . Columbus: Ohio State University Press. Benton, M. and S. Butcher. 1998. ‘Painting Shakespeare’ in Journal of Aesthetic Education, Vol. 32, No.3, University of Illinois Press. Bolter, J.D. 2001. Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print. New Jersey : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Krieger, M. 1992. Ekphrasis: The Illusion of the Natural Sign. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins

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Julianna Ispánovics Csapó

Abstract

The literary palette of Tolnai’s textual universe within the Hungarian literature from Vojvodina is based, among others, upon the intertwining of various cultural entities. The social and cultural spaces of “Big Yugoslavia,” the phenomena, figures, and works of the European-oriented Yugoslav and ethnic culture (literature, painting, book publishing, theatre, sports, etc.), the mentalities of the migrant worker’s life, the legends of the Tito cult embed the narrative procedures of particular texts by Tolnai into a rich culture-historical context. Similarly to the model of Valery’s Mediterranean, the narrator’s Janus-faced Yugoslavia simultaneously generates concrete and utopian spaces, folding upon one another. Above the micro spaces (towns, houses, flats) evolving along the traces of reality, there float the Proustian concepts of scent and colour of the Adriatic sea (salt, azure, mimosa, lavender, laurel). The nostalgia towards the lost Eden rises high and waves about the “grand form” of Big Yugoslavia, the related space of which is the Monarchy. The counterpoints of the grand forms are “the small, void forms,” provinces, regions (Vojvodina, North Bačka) and the micro spaces coded into them. The text analyses of the paper examine the intercultural motions and identityforming culture-historical elements of the outlined space system.