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Aleksandra Pivkova Veljanovska, Zlate Stojanoski, Lazar Chadievski, Irina Panovska Stavridis, Sanja Trajkova, Lidija Cevreska and Borche Georgievski

REFERENCES 1. Goni Lee, Seung Eun Lee, Kyung-Ha Ryu, and Eun Sun Yoo. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in pediatric patients undergoing treatment for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: clinical outcomes and putative risk factors. Blood Res. 2013 Dec; 48(4): 258–265. doi: 10.5045/br.2013.48.4.258. 2. Riccardo Masetti, Duccio Maria Cordelli, Daniele Zama, Francesca Vendemini, Carlotta Biagi, Emilio Franzoni, Andrea Pession. PRES in Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell or Solid Organ Transplantation. Pediatrics:135(5); 890-902 doi:10

Open access

Gabriela Belova and Anna Hristova

://pangeaupr.org/2015/04/17/case-note-brustle-v-greenpeace/ [14-15] http://eulawanalysis.blogspot.bg/2014/12/the-cjeu-clarifies-when-stem-cells-can.html [16] http://analysis1921.rssing.com/chan-30137355/all_p5.html [17-18] http://eulawanalysis.blogspot.bg/2014/12/the-cjeu-clarifies-when-stem-cells-can.html [19] http://humanistfederation.eu/ckfinder/userfiles/files/our-work/SRHR/IB%208%20European%20Citizens'%20Inititative%20-%20One%20of%20Us.pdf [20] http://www.oneofus.eu/initiative-explanation/ [21] http

Open access

Ikram Hili

Abstract

Important as they are in people’s mental and intellectual development and in their appreciation of the things around them, the Humanities remain a field that is, more often than not, frowned upon among people who firmly believe that the STEM fields are much more important, practical, and lucrative in a rapidly growing and competitive workplace. Besides, when scientific and technological breakthroughs have invaded every nook and cranny of our lives, the incessant comparison between science and the arts does not, and actually should not strike us as new or even shocking. The present paper seeks to revisit the status of the Humanities nowadays, by shedding light on the crisis befalling this field (inter)nationally. The paper also aims at providing a reappraisal of the moment of poetry—one that substantiates Poet Meena Alexander’s famous line, “We have poetry / So we do not die of history.” This is achieved through readings of Sylvia Plath’s so-called hospital poems that highlight the deft interplay between poetry, science and ideology.

Open access

Attila Imre

Abstract

The article aims at a logical approach to discussing must, organized around the core meaning of necessity, split into epistemic (logical necessity) and deontic necessity (obligation). After discussing must as a central modal auxiliary, we present various meanings of must, relying on authoritative sources published for international (English), Hungarian, and Romanian students. Possible issues of teaching must are also dealt with, supported by data from a popular TV series containing modal verbs. The conclusion discusses the importance and relativity of a number of occurrences, trying to offer a possible teaching option for modals stemming from practice.

Open access

Gabriel Estrada, Maurice Dawson and Jose Antonio Cárdenas-Haro

Abstract

African Americans and Hispanic Americans historically have been underrepresented in U.S. jobs in the fields of STEM in large part because of the usability of technology. In this research, the goal was to discover the usability factors relative to operating systems that may limit African Americans and Hispanic Americans from pursuit of computer science higher education. For the purpose of this study, “usability” refers to the “appropriateness of purpose.” Categorized by three factors, appropriateness of purpose can be defined as (i) the effectiveness of the users’ ability to complete tasks while using technology and the quality or output of those tasks, (ii) the efficiency and the level of resources used in performing tasks, and (iii) the satisfaction or users’ reaction to the use of technology (Brooke, 2014). This research examined quantitative analysis based on students’ routine computer task knowledge using a survey questionnaire and the SUS. The population included high school students responding to questions on common tasks and usability. A web survey was conducted to assess the measurement and understanding pattern demonstrated by the participants. The quantitative analysis of the computer usability included ANOVA, independent t-tests and orthogonal contrasts. The analysis of the SUS measured usability and learnability. The results of the data analysis showed that the combined African American and Hispanic group has a mean computer usability score that is significantly lower when compared with the other ethnicities and the SUS findings included the highest gap among this most underrepresented group in the STEM field.

Open access

Dorota Ruszkiewicz

Abstract

The issues presented in this publication are situated within the framework of qualitative research. The research concerns negative aspects stemming from not experiencing motherhood present in the narrative of women aged 35-42 years old. The aim of the research is identifying the disadvantages of childlessness as perceived by mature women. The research was performed on 38 women. The criterion of the research sample selection, apart from age, was being unmarried (a woman’s marital status was “unmarried”, “divorced” or “widow”; women in cohabitational relationships were not excluded) and childless.

The surveyed women were therefore asked the question: Do you notice some losses resulting from not functioning in the role of a mother? On the basis of central topics, i.e. topics that prevailed in the interviews, 5 response categories were determined: discrimination in the workplace, social stigma, discrimination in public space, not following the road leading to happiness and fulfilment, and loneliness in old age.

Open access

Ana Maria D. Preoteasa, Rebekka Sieber, Monica Budowski and Christian Suter

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a qualitative comparative study that looked at the meaning of ‘precarious work’ in households situated in the position of ‘precarious prosperity’ in Switzerland and Romania in 2013. The aim of this research is to explore the experiences of individuals with precarious work and to embed them into their household and national structural contexts. Employment patterns in the two countries are similar in terms of uncertainty and instability, yet vary in many other aspects. While in Romania insecurity is due mainly to the very low incomes, in Switzerland it stems from nonstandard contracts. The research shows that for households of precarious prosperity, precarious work is both a strategy to cope with uncertainty and instability and a circumstance leading to precariousness. The analysis explores qualitatively the meaning that individuals living in households of precarious prosperity attribute to their employment situation as contextualized by the interplay between household and individual situation.

Open access

Torsten Kolind, Vibeke Asmussen Frank, Hellevibeke Dahl and Mie Birk Haller

ABSTRACT

AIMS - The article outlines the historical development of prison drug treatment (PDT) in Denmark in order to understand the present situation where PDT is viewed as a natural benign practice. We also identify the different rationales within the political debate on PDT since its rapid expansion in 2000. DATA - Historical and policy documents, grey literature, interviews with key informants in the field. RESULTS - Four historical periods are identified, from a period when drug treatment was unwelcome in prisons to a re-emergence of the rehabilitation ideal over the last 15 years, when PDT appears unquestioned and its popularity has exploded. Five dissimilar and at times conflicting rationales have been present in the political debate legitimising this policy shift.

CONCLUSION - Part of the popularity of PDT stems from the fact that it has been used in political debates in order to justify a range of different and even conflicting objectives. With changing penal discourse, PDT may again become unwanted in prison settings.

Open access

Katarzyna Stemplewska-Żakowicz, Bartosz Zalewski, Hubert Suszek, Dorota Kobylińska and Bartosz Szymczyk

Abstract

The paper proposes the model of discursive mind and describes the cognitive architecture of the dialogically structured mind. The model draws on Hermans’ (1999) theory of the dialogical self (DS) and Wertsch’s (1991) vision of mind as a “tool kit” with socio-cultural instruments, and also on the socio-cognitive approach to personality in experimental psychology. An I-position is understood here as an active totality of experience, shaped in a particular social context and represented in a separate representation module. Th ere are many modules in the mind because in the course of socialization, the individual comes across many different social contexts. Th e described model and its preliminary empirical verification not only gives support to the DS theory, but can also be a leverage of its contribution to general theories of mind stemming from other theoretical traditions

Open access

Attila Imre

Abstract

The article aims at a logical approach to discussing can, could, and be able to, organized around core meanings such as possibility, ability, and permission. We argue that the concept of “remoteness” proposed by Lewis in 1986 may simplify enough the explanation regarding the relationship between can and could, and their presentation relies on authoritative sources published for international (English), Hungarian, and Romanian students. The conclusion discusses both the importance and relativity of a number of occurrences (depending on different text types), trying to offer a possible teaching option for modals stemming from practice. The article is connected to the international conference in Miercurea Ciuc, entitled Idegen - Străinul - Stranger, focusing on English as a foreign language through the eyes of non-native speakers.