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Zlate Stojanoski, Anzelika Karadzova-Stojanoska, Aleksandra Pivkova-Veljanovska, Sonja Genadieva-Stavrik, Lazar Cadievski, Martin Ivanovski, Oliver Karanfilski, Lidija Cevreska and Borce Georgievski

References 1. Tyndall A, and Gratwohl A. Blood and marrow stem cell transplants in auto-immune disease: a consensus report written on behalf of the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the European Group for Blood and marrow transplantation (EBMT). Bone Marrow Transplantation 1997; 19: 643-645. 2. van Laar JM, Farge D, Sont JK, et al . EBMT/EULAR Scleroderma Study Group.: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA

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Lazar Chadievski, Sonja Genadieva Stavric, Aleksandra Pivkova Veljanovska, Zlate Stojanoski, Dijana Miloska, Lidija Cevreska and Borce Georgievski

, et al . Bone marrow trans-plants may cure patients with acute leukemia never achieving remission with chemotherapy. Blood 1992; 80: 1090. 8. Feller N1, van der Pol MA, Waaijman T. Immunologic purging of autologous peripheral blood stem cell products based on CD34 and CD133 expression can be effectively and safely applied in half of the acute myeloid leukemia patients. Clin Cancer Res 2005; 11(13): 4793-4801. 9. Revesz D, Chelghoum Y, Le QH, et al . Salvage by timed sequential chemotherapy in primary resistant acute myeloid leukemia: Analysis of

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Hanyu Wang and Weihong Kuang

1 Introduction Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well-established form of therapy for malignant hematological disorders [ 1 , 2 ]. The treatment is complicated by treatment-related mortality because of infections, regimen-related toxicity, and engraftment failure [ 3 , 4 , 5 ]. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a pivotal factor that contributes to engraftment failure [ 6 , 7 ], despite an intensive preparative regimen, an adequate cell dose, and complete donor chimerism. Patients with grade III and grade IV acute GVHD have

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Zhi-Jian Li, Xing-Ling Sui, Xue-Bo Yang and Wen Sun

corresponding BMs and PB, respectively. The comparison among the number of DEGs obtained in the four experiments showed that LB cells did not tend to differentiation and CD34+ was more similar to cancer stem cells. The heatmaps of the top 20 DEGs obtained in the four experiments are shown in Figures 2 – 5 , respectively. As shown in Figure 2 , the top 5 ranked DEGs in experiment 1 were GYPA, LCK, ITK, BCL11B, and RHAG. In Figure 3 , the top 5 ranked DEGs were TAL1, RHOH, MYH10, TYROBP, and CFD. In Figure 4 , the top 5 ranked DEGs were CXCR2, MGAM, TNFRSF10C, KCNJ15, and

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Fatimah Saka Sanni, Hajja Gana Hamza and Patrick Azubuike Onyeyili

Biotechnol 2011; 10(48):9875-9879. 4. Sanni FS. Toxicological profile and anti-diarrheal effect of stem bark of Detarium senegalense (J.F. Gmelin) extracts in albino rats. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria, 2013; 1-118. 5. Akinniyi JA, Tella A. Rural resources and national development (Post). A case for the recognition of African traditional medicine in Nigeria. Ann Borno 1991; 617:279-293. 6. Atawodi SE. Antibacterial effects of Combretum glutinosum and Tapinantus dodoneifolius extracts on Salmonella gallinarum

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Basel Saleh, Razan Hammoud and Ayman Al-Mariri

References 1. Anowi CF, Cardinal NC, Mbah CJ, Onyekaba TC. Antimicrobial properties of the methanolic extract of the stem bark of Nauclea Latifolia. IJPI’S J Pharma Herb Form 2012; 2: 10-21. 2. Adebayo-Tayo BC, Odeniyi AO. Phytochemical screening and microbial inhibitory activities of Ficus Capensis. Afr J Biomed Res 2012; 15: 35- 40. 3. Josephs GC, Ching FP, Nnabuife AC. Investigation of the antimicrobial potentials of some phytochemical extracts of leaf and stem bark of Berlinia grandiflora (Leguminoceae

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Adarki Pongri and Ighodaro Igbe

. Louppe D, Oteng-Amoako AA, Brink M. Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 7(1). Timber 1, PROVA Foundation, Wageningen, Netherlands; Backhuys Publishers, Lenden, Netherlands; CTA,Wageningen, Netherlands 2008:298-300. 7. Dalziel JM. The Useful Plants of West Africa, Crown Agents for the Colonies, London, UK 1937. 8. Shagal MH, Kubmarawa D, Idi Z. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity of roots, stem bark and leaf extracts of Grewia mollis. Afr J Biotech 2012; 11(51):11350-3. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5897/AJB11

Open access

Katarzyna Bączek, Mirosław Angielczyk, Kamila Mosakowska, Olga Kosakowska and Zenon Węglarz

Summary

Southern sweet-grass (Hierochloë australis /Schrad./ Roem. & Schult.) is a perennial, wild growing tuft grass occurring in North-East Poland, Belarus and Finland. In Poland the species is under the partial legal protection. The raw material harvested from this plant are leaves rich in coumarins, mainly in coumarin responsible for specific sweet aroma of leaves. They are used mostly for the aromatization of alcohol and tobacco products. Due to high demand for the raw material and decrease in the natural resources of the species, it is advisable to introduce the plant into cultivation. In the presented study vegetative planting stock (1-, 2-, and 4-stem cuttings) were used to set the plantation of southern sweet-grass. The influence of the planting stock type on the mass of leaves and their quality in the first and second year of plant vegetation as well as the mass of seeds from two-year-old plants were investigated. The highest number of well rooted plants was obtained from 4-stem cuttings (74.07%) and the least - from 1-stem cuttings (47.53%). Both, on one- and two-year-old plantations the plants from 4-stem cuttings were characterized by the highest mass of leaves (7.73 and 24.65 g ˟ plant-1, respectively). The plants were also characterized by the highest number of generative shoots (40.71 pcs. ˟ plant-1) and mass of seeds (4.62 g ˟ plant-1). The total contents of coumarins and phenolic acids did not depend on the type of planting stock. The contents of these compounds was higher in two-year-old plants than in one-year-old ones, whereas the content of flavonoids was higher in one-year-old plants.

Open access

P.A. Onyeyili and K. Aliyoo

Summary

The control of trypanosomosis in animals and humans based on chemotherapy is limited and not ideal, since the agents used are associated with severe side effects, and emergence of relapse and drug resistant parasites. The need for the development of new, cheap and safe compounds stimulated this study. Three concentrations (211, 21.1 and 2.11 mg per ml) of chloroform stem bark extract of Annona muricata were screened for trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei in vitro. Also, two doses (200 mg per kg and 100 mg per kg) of the extract were evaluated for trypanocidal activity in rats infected with the parasite. Haematological parameters were determined on day 1 post infection and on days 1, 6 and 30-post extract treatment. The extracts inhibited parasite motility and totally eliminated the organisms at the concentrations used in vitro. The extract also showed promising in vivo trypanocidal activity. The observed in vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activities may be due to the presence of bioactive compounds present in the extracts as seen in this study. The extract also improved the observed decreases in haematological parameters of the treated rats, which may be due to their ability to decrease parasite load. The observed oral LD50 of 1,725.05 mg per kg of the chloroform A. muricata extract using up and down method is an indication of very low toxicity, implying that the extract could be administered with some degree of safety.

Open access

Herba Polonica

From Botanical to Medical Research