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Allomorphy in the plural morpheme of Old English disyllabic neuter a-stem nouns: Analogy and token frequency

: Clarendon Press. Dahl, Ivar 1938 Substantival inflexion in Early Old English, vocalic stems (Lund Studies in English 7). Lund: C. W. K. Gleerup. Fulk, R. D. 2010 "The roles of phonology and analogy in Old English high vowel deletion", Transactions of the Philological Society 108: 126-144. Hogg, Richard M. 2000 "On the (non-)existence of High Vowel Deletion", in: Aditi Lahiri (ed.), 353-377. Ker, Neil Ripley 1957 Catalogue of manuscripts containing Anglo-Saxon. Vol

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The Morphological Trigger of V-to-T: The Case of Old English

Abstract

This paper deals with the phenomenon of V-to-T movement, which is one of the major parameters differentiating Romance from the majority of modern Germanic languages, and it defends the idea that rich morphology is the cause or trigger of V-to-T: in Romance, in a modern Germanic language like Icelandic, and very particularly in Old English, the precursor of the modern English language. More generally, the discussion endorses the idea that all Germanic languages used to be V-to-T languages in their old periods. I begin by arguing that verbal forms in Spanish contain a specific kind of segment, namely the stem or thematic vowel, which gives rise to morphological variations or asymmetries across tenses in the language. Such a productive system of stem verb classes is also shown to be the case in Icelandic, though not in German (which is therefore rendered as non-V-to-T), and ultimately it is acknowledged for a language like OE. The hypothesis is that the syntactic computation of (OE) verbal forms demands it that the speaker first identifies the verb class that the form in question belongs to before tackling the processing of tense morphology and agreement morphology. In pure syntactic terms, the stem or thematic vowel segment is identified in the present account with a v-feature that T must value, which valuation is realised by means of the displacement of the verb to the T head, that is, by means of V-to-T movement. After the valuation of T’s v-feature comes the valuation of τ-features and φ-features, respectively.

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Whither Teaching in the University Novel?

Abstract

Scenes of explicit teaching make only limited appearances in the university novel since World War II. While it would be easy – if cynical – to attribute this minimization to the devaluation of teaching in the modern university, the importance of teaching and learning to sympathetic characters (and their lack of importance to corrupted figures) suggests that this lack of focus on the classroom stems from something else. Indeed, university novels tend to be fairly conservative aesthetically, and the demands of traditional narrative make extended classroom scenes difficult if not impossible to manage. Because of these narrative demands, learning and teaching take on different forms in the university novel, creating stories in which education corresponds to the struggle of teachers and students with and against administrators and buildings – stories that, therefore, resemble Leo van Lier’s observation about how remembering our own educations as stories contradicts more bureaucratic visions of learning. This observation holds true whether one considers better-known works of university fiction such as David Lodge’s Campus Trilogy, Mary McCarthy’s The Groves of Academe, and Julie Schumacher’s Dear Committee Members or lesser-known works produced by micro-presses and writers who are enabled by current technologies to publish electronically.

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The Bases of Derivation of Old English Affixed Nouns: Status and Category

. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Kärre, Karl 1915 Nomina agentis in Old English. Uppsala: Akademiska Bokhandeln. Kastovsky, Dieter 1968 Old English deverbal substantives derived by means of a zero morpheme. [Ph.D. dissertation, Tübingen, Eberhard-Karls-Universität.] Kastovsky, Dieter 1986 "Deverbal nouns in Old and Modern English: From stem-formation to wordformation", in: Jacek Fisiak (ed.), 221-261. Kastovsky, Dieter 1989 "Typological changes in the history of

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Early Old English Nominal System: Synchronic Declensions in the Vespasian Psalter

References Kuhn, Sherman M. (ed.). 1965. The Vespasian Psalter. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Aronoff, Mark. [1994] 1996. Morphology by itself: Stems and inflectional classes. (2nd edn.). Massachusetts: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ball, C. J. E. 1970. The language of the Vespasian Psalter gloss: Two caveats. The Review of English Studies, New Series 21, 84. 462-465. Beard, Robert. 1995. Lexeme-morpheme base morphology: A general

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Full Access to Cultural Spaces (FACS): Mapping and evaluating museum access services using mobile eye-tracking technology

Abstract

The present paper aims to present significant results stemming from the FACS (Full Access to Cultural Spaces) project, launched in 2014 by the University of Macerata and concluded in 2016. In particular, this paper reports on stages one and two of the FACS project which aimed first to explore the state of the art of universal access services across a large variety of museums in Italy and nine other EU countries. Based on the first stage, an analysis of some of the most significant data obtained from a questionnaire sent out to over 1,200 European museums will be presented, with a special focus on multilingual devices and access services for the sensory impaired. The first stage was followed by an eye-tracking study on an Italian museum, Turin’s Museo Nazionale del Cinema (National Cinema Museum), aimed at evaluating visitors’ experience, attitudes and patterns of fruition through a test with a portable eye tracker (Tobii Pro Glasses 2, 50 Hz). Based on this second stage, the fruition of information panels by museum visitors at the Museo Nazionale del Cinema will be explored, specifically focusing on reading patterns and behaviours.

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Ethnic humour in a multicultural society

Abstract

The coexistence of different cultures in specific pluralistic settings not only has positive but also negative impacts. Besides exchanging cultural contents within a multicultural environment, societies use humour as a form of social interaction, which reinforces cultural interrelationships as well as ethnical differences. However, humour differs from culture to culture and from individual to individual. On the one hand, it develops social cohesion, fosters positive relations and increases the self-identification of the individual in relation to other ethnic groups, but on the other hand, it functions as an acceptable and tolerated form of aggression in a particular society. The bipolar character of humour stems from its status and functions. It serves both as a social unifier and a social separator. The most common paradigms of humour in social discourse are ethnic jokes or cartoons that are often built on fixed ethnic/racial stereotypes leading to social categorization but also to fast and correct decoding of semantic information by an audience. Ethnic jokes are social thermometers, recording and measuring the level of sensitivity towards specific cultural groups. The main aim of this paper is to introduce ethnic humour and its key functions in the context of ongoing cultural interactions and changes.

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The Round Allograph of in Late Middle English

Abstract

This paper discusses glyphs of the 2-shaped or “round” allograph of the grapheme <r> with a tag protruding from the lower part of the stem, asking whether their distribution in a corpus of some 600 late Middle English texts can be meaningfully related to these texts’ localisation in A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English. It discusses what localisation expresses, and uses regression modelling to show that there is no co-variation between the texts’ paleography and their orthography, although there is a measure of correlation between them. The evidence in favour is that the quantitative analysis identifies localisation in northings as a predictor of the occurrence of the tagged form of the allograph, which occurs at a higher frequency in texts localised below the Midlands line at c. 300 northings. The evidence against is the form’s scattered distribution according to the localisation variable where co-variation would imply a more clear-cut concentration of points, and also the moderate success at explaining the form’s distribution by means of variables known to explain orthographic variation.

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Alternation vs. Allomorphic Variation in Old English Word-Formation: Evidence from the Derivational Paradigm of Strong Verbs

. Tübingen: Eberhard-Karls-Universität. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1986. Deverbal nouns in Old and Modern English: From stem-formation to word-formation. In Jacek Fisiak (ed.), Historical semantics - historical word formation, 221-261. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1989. Morphophonemic alternations and the history of English: Examples from Old English. In Manfred Markus (ed.), Historical English. On the occasion of KarlBrunner's 100th birthday, 112-123. Innsbruck: Universität. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1990. The typological status of Old English word formation

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OLD ENGLISH ADJECTIVAL AFFIXATION: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1968. Old English deverbal substantives derived by means of a zero morpheme. Tübingen: Eberhard-Karls-Universität dissertation. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1971. The Old English suffix -ER(E). Anglia LXXXIX(3). 285-325. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1986. Deverbal nouns in Old and Modern English: From stem-formation to word-formation. In Jacek Fisiak (ed.), Historical semantics - Historical word formation, 221-261. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. Kastovsky, Dieter. 1989. Typological changes in the history of English morphology. In

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