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Beyond School Reach: Character Education in Three Schools in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Abstract

The ability of Indonesian schools related to the character education of students is still far from the expectations and mandate of the law. Based on the qualitative research conducted in the three schools in Indonesia, the current study shows that the educational process only introduce students to the standardized concepts with no involvement in social process and practices, which will give them experience and opportunities to adopt the character values. The school curriculum only forms the ideal type of character, does not stimulate the active involvement of students in the community. Students only learn the character, based on dominant values constrained by the state, i.e.: having loyalty, defending the country, and loving homeland. In addition to narrowing the character space values to the interests of the state, the character education also does not accommodate the wealth of ethnic and religious cultures in Indonesia. This paper proposes the need for changes in school autonomy from an extension of the government, leading to provision of a conducive climate for the emergence of various approaches to improve character education. Character education stems from differences in school ideology and Indonesian cultural diversity. The education system should release itself from the text orientation to better fit in with the dynamic cultural context as a source of character learning.

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Self-Assessed Metacognitive Awareness among Students of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Science Education, 12(1), pp.95-99. Avargil S., Lavi R., Dori Y.J. (2018) Students’ Metacognition and Metacognitive Strategies in Science Education. In: Dori Y., Mevarech Z., Baker D. (eds) Cognition, Metacognition, and Culture in STEM Education. Innovations in Science Education and Technology, vol 24. Springer, Cham Azevedo, R., 2009. Theoretical, conceptual, methodological, and instructional issues in research on metacognition and self-regulated learning: A discussion. Metacognition and Learning, 4(1), pp.87-95. Clark, R. and Harrelson, G.L., 2002

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Extra-Linguistic Features of the Southern Dialect of American English in the Novel of Harper Lee “Go Set a Watchman”

., Rystina, I., Bulegenova, B., Askeyeva, G., & Gabdulina, B. (2018). President Nursultan Nazarbayevs program article “The course towards future: Modernization of public consciousness” – ideology, value and political aspects. Opción , 34 (85-2), 824-837. Singh, P., Teoh, S. H., Cheong, T. H., Md Rasid, N. S., Kor, L. K., & Md Nasir, N. A. (2018). The Use of Problem-Solving Heuristics Approach in Enhancing STEM Students Development of Mathematical Thinking. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 13 (3), 289-303. https://doi.org/10.12973/iejme

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A cross-cultural study of the smile in the Russian- and English-speaking world

Abstract

Although the smile is a universal facial expression, the use of smiles in communication varies across cultures. This may lead to misunderstandings and miscommunication. Both Americans and Europeans experience the same frustration and communication failure when they do not find smiling faces in Russia. At the same time, it is common for Russian people to perceive the smiles of Westerners as artificial and insincere. What is the reason for such a difference in perception? Why don’t Russians smile in some situations?

The study of the use of the smile as a non-verbal sign in a few chosen communicative contexts across Russian, European and American cultures showed the difference in its meaning and distribution according to the cultural tradition. The reason could stem from the difference of Russia’s history when compared to that of Western Europe, as well as in the specific restrictions in Russian Orthodox Christianity and the traditions of laughter in Russia. All the meanings and specific cases of distribution are clearly retained and expressed in the languages. If we compare the Russian улыбка and улыбаться with the English smile, we can see both common and distinctive semantic elements and different connotations.

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Developing Learners’ Intercultural Understanding through a CLIL Approach

Abstract

Language and culture are interconnected and teaching a language should also be concerned with offering learners a wide range of opportunities to gain insights into other cultures. Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) approaches have an invaluable contribution to make towards developing learners’ intercultural understanding (ICU), by making the content culturally relevant to the language of instruction. Within this paradigm, this paper presents the findings of an action-based research project seeking to develop ICU among secondary learners of French in England, through the teaching of a series of lessons following a CLIL approach. Stemming from its findings, it is proposed here that a renewed understanding of CLIL be defined, in which CLIL would stand for Content and Language Intercultural Learning. Within this framework, the content would be conceptualised through the lens of culture, to offer learners opportunities to compare and contrast experiences and viewpoints, to develop their cultural knowledge, as well as their intercultural skills and attitudes – by means of exposure, independent exploration and collaborative work. The language, still driven by the content, would encompass both the language of learning, and the language required through the learning processes - and would be language that is both accessible and cognitively challenging. Learning would occur through cognitively demanding content that is real, relevant and engaging, yet accessible to all.

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Measuring Students’ Knowledge Level of Life Insurance: A Case on the Students of the Department of Insurance and Risk Management at the Dumlupinar University, Turkey

Abstract

Life insurance is a type of insurance that protects individuals or their relatives who are left behind after death or permanent injury. Although it is quite different from the diversity in the world, life insurance in Turkey, which also allows accumulation with providing death benefit, contribute to the tendency of people to save money. One of the reasons for slower development in life insurances in Turkey compared to the countries in the world stems from the education in the field of insurance. Indicators such as insufficient number of institutes and experts in the field and low ratio of insurance literacy are the outcomes of this inadequate education system. Hence, lack of education is directly connected with the level of students’ knowledge. The aim of this study, in which a cross-tabulated survey is used, is to measure the undergraduates’ knowledge level of basics of life insurance at the department of Insurance and Risk Management in Dumlupinar University. Results show that students who are taking education at the Dumlupinar University at the department of Insurance and Risk Management, have very low knowledge about basic life insurance. This study is important in determining the knowledge level of the students who will be in the insurance sector in the future and who will have an individual relationship with the customers.

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Fundamentals of Mathematical Knowledge in the Traditional Culture of Evenks

-1855. Ethnographic research prior to Shternberg pp.134 - 157. Podmaskin, V. V. (2008). Folk knowledge of the Amur Evenkss. Russia and ATR. № 1. 88-101. Razumovskaya, V. (2014). Translating Aboriginal Siberian and Circumpolar Cultures in Russia. Translators, Interpreters, and Cultural Negotiators . pp. 190-212. Rosa, M., & Orey, D. C. (2017). STEM education in the brazilian context: An ethnomathematical perspective. STEM education in the junior secondary: The state of play (pp. 221-247) doi:10.1007/978-981-10-5448-8_11. Shelegina, O. N. (2006). Results

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A functional comparison of recurrent word-combinations in English original vs. translated texts

(ed.). Translation. Literary, linguistic and philosophical perspectives, 159-175. Newark: University of Delaware Press. Gellerstam, Martin. 1986. Translationese in Swedish novels translated from English. In L. Wollin and H. Lindquist (eds.). Translation studies in Scandinavia, 88-95. Lund: CWK Gleerup. Granger, Sylviane. 2014. A lexical bundle approach to comparing languages: Stems in English and French. In M-A. Lefer and S. Vogeleer (eds.). Genreand register-related discourse features in contrast. Special issue of Languages in

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