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Zbigniew M. Bochenski, Teresa Tomek and Ewa Swidnicka

, 1–111. Kristoffersen A.V. 2002: The avian diversity in the latest Paleocene-earliest Eocene Fur Formation, Denmark. A synopsis. PhD thesis. University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen, Denmark, 1–91. Ksepka D.T., Clarke J.A., Nesbitt S.J., Kulp F.B. & Grande L. 2013: Fossil evidence of wing shape in a stem relative of swifts and hummingbirds (Aves, Pan-Apodiformes). Proc. R. Soc. B 280, 20130580, 1–8. Kundrát M., Soták J. & Ahlberg P.E. 2015: A putative upupiform bird from the Early Oligocene of the Central Western Carpathians and a review of fossil

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Peter Vršanský and Günter Bechly

Abstract

We describe a new extinct lineage Manipulatoridae (new family) of cockroaches from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber of Myanmar. Manipulator modificaputis gen. et sp. n. is a morphologically unique extinct cockroach that represents the first (of a total of 29 known worldwide) cockroach family reported exclusively from the Myanmar amber. This family represents an early side branch of the stem group of Mantodea (most probably a sister group of Eadiidae within Blattaria/Corydioidea) because it has some synapomorphies with the Mantodea (including the stem group and Eadiidae). This family also retains symplesiomorphies that exclude a position in the crown group, and furthermore has unique autapomorphies that exclude a position as a direct ancestor of Mantodea. The unique adaptations such as strongly elongated extremities and freely movable head on a long neck suggest that these animals were pursuit predators. Five additional specimens (including two immatures) reported from the Myanmar amber suggest that this group was relatively rare but belonged to the indigenous and autochthonous inhabitants of the ancient amber forest of the Myanmar region.

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Gregory D. Price, István Főzy and András Galácz

Abstract

A carbonate carbon isotope curve from the Aalenian–Bathonian interval is presented from the Óbánya valley, of the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary. This interval is certainly less well constrained and studied than other Jurassic time slices. The Óbánya valley lies in the eastern part of the Mecsek Mountains, between Óbánya and Kisújbánya and provides exposures of an Aalenian to Lower Cretaceous sequence. It is not strongly affected by tectonics, as compared to other sections of eastern Mecsek of the same age. In parts, a rich fossil assemblage has been collected, with Bathonian ammonites being especially valuable at this locality. The pelagic Middle Jurassic is represented by the Komló Calcareous Marl Formation and thin-bedded limestones of the Óbánya Limestone Formation. These are overlain by Upper Jurassic siliceous limestones and radiolarites of the Fonyászó Limestone Formation. Our new data indicate a series of carbon isotope anomalies within the late Aalenian and early-middle Bajocian. In particular, analysis of the Komló Calcareous Marl Formation reveals a negative carbon isotope excursion followed by positive values that occurs near the base of the section (across the Aalenian–Bajocian boundary). The origin of this carbon-isotope anomaly is interpreted to lie in significant changes to carbon fluxes potentially stemming from reduced run off, lowering the fertility of surface waters which in turn leads to lessened primary production and a negative δ13C shift. These data are comparable with carbonate carbon isotope records from other Tethyan margin sediments. Our integrated biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy enable us to improve stratigraphic correlation and age determination of the examined strata. Therefore, this study of the Komló Calcareous Marl Formation confirms that the existing carbon isotope curves serve as a global standard for Aalenian–Bathonian δ13C variation.

Open access

Longfeng Li, Chungkun Shih and Dong Ren

-322. Ren D., Shih C.K., Gao T.P., Yao Y.Z. & Zhao Y.Y. 2012: Insect fossil treasures from the Mesozoic of the Northeastern China. Science Press, Beijing, 1-409 (in Chinese). Shang L.J., Béthoux O. & Ren D. 2011: New stem-Phasmatodea from the Middle Jurassic of China. Eur. J. Entomol. 108, 677-685. Shi G.F., Zhu Y., Shih C.K. & Ren D. 2013: A new Axymyiid ge- nus with two new species from the Middle Jurassic of China (Diptera: Nematocera: Axymyiidae). Acta Geol. Sin. Engl. Ed. 87, 1228-1234. Shi C.F., Makarkina V.N., Yang Q

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Farzaneh Shakerardakani, Franz Neubauer, Manfred Bernroider, Albrecht Von Quadt, Irena Peytcheva, Xiaoming Liu, Johann Genser, Behzad Monfaredi and Fariborz Masoudi

. Mineral. Mag. 61, 295–321. Leitch A.M. & Davies G.F. 2001: Mantle plumes and flood basalts: Enhanced melting from plume ascent and an eclogite component. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 2047–2059. Li B., Bagas L., Gallardo L.A., Said N., Diwu C.H. & McCuaig T.C. 2013: Back-arc and post-collisional volcanism in the Paleoproterozoic Granites-Tanami Orogen, Australia. Precambrian Res. 224, 570–587. Lin P.N., Stem R.J., Morris J. & Bloomer S.H. 1990: Nd- and Sr-isotopic compositions of lavas from the northern Mariana and southern Volcano arcs: implications for

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Barbara Woronko, Paweł Zieliński and Robert Jan Sokołowski

Abstract

We present results of research into fluvial to aeolian successions at four sites in the foreland of the Last Glacial Maximum, i.e., the central part of the “European Sand Belt”. These sites include dune fields on higher-lying river terraces and alluvial fans. Sediments were subjected to detailed lithofacies analyses and sampling for morphoscopic assessment of quartz grains. Based on these results, three units were identified in the sedimentary succession: fluvial, fluvio-aeolian and aeolian. Material with traces of aeolian origin predominate in these sediments and this enabled conclusions on the activity of aeolian processes during the Pleniglacial and Late Glacial, and the source of sediment supply to be drawn. Aeolian processes played a major role in the deposition of the lower portions of the fluvial and fluvio-aeolian units. Aeolian material in the fluvial unit stems from aeolian accumulation of fluvial sediments within the valley as well as particles transported by wind from beyond the valley. The fluvio-aeolian unit is composed mainly of fluvial sediments that were subject to multiple redeposition, and long-term, intensive processing in an aeolian environment. In spite of the asynchronous onset of deposition of the fluvio-aeolian unit, it is characterised by the greatest homogeneity of structural and textural characteristics. Although the aeolian unit was laid down simultaneously, it is typified by the widest range of variation in quartz morphoscopic traits. It reflects local factors, mainly the origin of the source material, rather than climate. The duration of dune-formation processes was too short to be reflected in the morphoscopy of quartz grains.

Open access

Mateusz Antczak and Błażej Berkowski

-Atlas (Morocco), and their relation to submarine hydrothermal venting. Journal of Sedimentary Research 68, 368-377. Berkowski, B., 2008. Emsian deep-water Rugosa assemblages of Hamar Laghdad (Devonian, Anti-Atlas, Morocco). Palaeontographica Abteilung A 284, 17-68. Berkowski, B. & Klug, C., 2012. Lucky rugose corals on crinoid stems: unusual examples of subepidermal epizoans from the Devonian of Morocco. Lethaia 45, 24-33. Brachert, T.C., Buggisch, W., Flügel, E., Hüssner, H.M., Joachimski, M.M., Tourneur, F. & Walliser, O

Open access

Alina Chrząstek and Monika Wypych

fossils from interdune deposits – an example from the Lower Triassic Aeolian Tumlin Sandstone, central Poland. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 108, 121–138. Greguš, J., Kvaček, J. & Halamski, A.T., 2013. Revision of Protopteris and Oncopteris tree fern stem casts from the Late Cretaceous of Central Europe. Acta Musei Nationalis Pragae Series B – Historia Naturalis 69, 69–83. Griffis, R.B. & Suchanek, T.H., 1991. A model of burrow architecture and trophic modes in thalassinidean shrimp (Decapoda: Thalassinidea). Marine Ecology