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Adipose-derived stem cells cultured in autologous serum maintain the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

., Bradley, N. J., Monaghan, P., Delia, D., Sutherland, D. R., Baker, M. A., Greaves, M. F. (1990). Expression of the CD34 gene in vascular endothelial cells. Blood , 75 (12), 2417-2426. Fraser, J. K., Wulur, I., Alfonso, Z., Hedrick, M. H. (2006). Fat tissue: An underappreciated source of stem cells for biotechnology. Trends Biotechnol. , 24 (4), 150-154. Fukuda, K. (2001). Development of regenerative cardiomyocytes from mesenchymal stem cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Artif. Organs , 25 (3), 187

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Alterations of The Stem-Like Properties in The Breast Cancer Cell Line MDA-MB-231 Induced by Single Pulsed Doxorubicin Treatment

computing, Vienna. Available from: https://www.R-project.org/ (accessed 20.01.2019). Brooks, D. L. P., Schwab, L. P., Krutilina, R., Parke, D. N., Sethuraman, A., Hoogewijs, D., Schörg, A., Gotwald, L., Fan, M., Wenger, R. H., Seagroves, T. N. (2016). ITGA6 is directly regulated by hypoxia- inducible factors and enriches for cancer stem cell activity and invasion in metastatic breast cancer models. Mol. Cancer , 15 , 26. Cortós-Funes, H., Coronado, C. (2007). Role of anthracyclines in the era of targeted therapy. Cardiovasc. Toxicol., 7 (2), 56

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Characterisation and In Vivo Safety of Canine Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

REFERENCES Abdi, R., Fiorina, P., Adra, C. N., Atkinson, M., Sayegh, M. H. (2008). Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells. Diabetes, 57 , 1759–1767. Anjos-Afonso, F., Siapati, E. K., Bonnet, D. (2004). In vivo contribution of murine mesenchymal stem cells into multiple cell-types under minimal damage conditions. J. Cell Sci., 117 , 5655–5664. Anonymous (2007). No. 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending directive 2001/83/EC and regulation (EC) no

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Effect of HHV-6 and HHV-7 Infection on the Posttransplant Process and the Development of Complications in Patients after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation / HHV-6 Un HHV-7 Infekcijas Ietekme Uz Pēctransplantācijas Klīnisko Gaitu Un Komplikāciju Attīstību Pacientiem Pēc Autologas Cilmes Šūnu Transplantācijas

-lymphotropic virus and is related to, but significantly different from human herpesvirus 6 and human cytomegalovirus. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89, 10552-10556. Boutolleau, D., Fernandez, C., Andre, E., Imbert-Marcille, B. M., Milpied, N., Agut, H., Gautheret-Dejean, A. (2003). Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and HHV-7: Two closely viruses with different infection profiles in stem cell transplantation recipients. J. Infect. Dis., 187, 179-186. Carrigan, D. R., Drobyski, W. R., Russler, S. K., Tapper, M. A., Knox, K. K., Ash, R. C. (1991). Intersticial

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A Transient Method for Determining Thermal Diffusivity of Tobacco Stems

during the cure; Trans. ASAE 11 (1968) 480-483. 8. Danielson, G. C., and P. H. Sidles: Thermal diffusivity and other non-steady-state methods; in Thermal conductivity, edited by R. P. Tye, Aca-' demic Press, New York, N.Y., 1969. 9. Locklair, E. E., W. D. Galloway and M. Samfield: The thermal diffusivity of tobacco; Tob. Sci. 28 (1957) 28-32. 10. Ford, R. M., and W. K. Bilanski: Thermal diffusivity of alfalfa stems; Trans. ASAE 12 (1969) 249— 251. 11. Barthakur, N

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New Modalities in Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Using Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Cells

REFERENCES Caplan, A. I. (1991). Mesenchymal stem cells. J. Orthop. Res ., 9 (5), 641–650. Caplan, A. I. (2008). All MSCs are pericytes? Cell Stem Cell , 3 (3), 229–230. Caplan, A. I., Dennis, J. E. (2006). Mesenchymal stem cells as trophic mediators. J. Cell. Biochem ., 98 (5), 1076–1084. Centeno, C., Pitts, J., Al-Sayegh, H., Freeman, M., Centeno, C., Pitts, J., Al-Sayegh, H., Freeman, M. (2014). Efficacy of autologous bone marrow concentrate for knee osteoarthritis with and without adipose graft. BioMed Res. Int ., DOI:10

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The Removal of Stems from Cut Tobacco

Abstract

The presence of stems in cut tobacco is detrimental to cigarette quality, resulting in problems during production particularly on today's high-speed makers. Incomplete threshing and the use of unthreshed semi-Oriental tobaccos can increase the stem content in the cut tobacco considerably. The percentage of stems present in cut tobacco was investigated by HauniMaschinenbau AG specifically for semi-Oriental tobacco. Their findings show that not all stems present in the strips or lamina after cutting are classified as “objectionable”. However, the percentage of objectionable stems in the cut tobacco is not inconsiderable and depends on the thickness of the stems present. Reducing the objectionable stem contingent in cut tobacco is therefore a crucial concern of many cigarette manufacturers who set great store on ensuring high-quality product. HauniMaschinenbau AG offers a cut tobacco separator which has been specially designed for this purpose and also used as a cooler. A corresponding model is available in the HauniMaschinenbau AG pilot plant in Hamburg for tests using the customers’ own tobacco.

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Analyses of Bright and Burley Tobacco Laminae and Stems

Abstract

One sample each of aged uncased, cured bright lamina, bright stems, Burley lamina and Burley stems were examined by a variety of general analytical methods and then characterized by our standard fractionation procedure. These tobacco samples were chosen to be reasonably representative of the tobaccos used in current commercial cigarette products. Although for a given variety of tobacco the concentrations of chemical constituents may vary as a function of stalk position, cultural management, geographic origin or crop year, we believe that the following conclusions based on these samples are generally valid: [1] levels of ethanol solubles, total reducing sugars and starch are much higher in bright than in Burley, [2] concentrations of soluble ammonia and nitrate are greater in Burley than in bright, [3] total alkaloid and protein concentrations are higher in lamina than in stems, [4] cellulose, potassium and chloride concentrations are much greater in stems than in lamina, [5] concentrations of pectin, lignin and soluble hemicellulose do not vary greatly from one type of tobacco to another, [6] Burley lamina has greater concentrations of protein and acid detergent solubles than do the other types of tobaccos, and [7] bright lamina has a much lower level of total ash than do the other types of tobaccos. An examination of some of the components in ash led to the following conclusions: [1] total ash values are reasonable relative indicators of the level of non-nitrate inorganics, [2] a good estimate of the total contents of potassium, calcium, chloride, sulfate, phosphorus, silicon and magnesium may be obtained by multiplying the total ash value by 0.612, and [3] it is likely that most of the potassium and calcium in total ash is actually present as carbonates rather than oxides. The significantly higher levels of both protein and acid detergent solubles found in Burley lamina are thought to indicate that this protein may be unique in terms of its carbohydrate content or in terms of the nature or extent of its cross linkage.

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Shredding - A Novel Technology for the Processing of Tobacco Stems which Alters Cigarette Properties

Abstract

Shredding is a novel process for the utilization of tobacco stems. Stem pieces are forced between large, counter-rotating toothed blades where they are stripped lengthwise into thin, fibrous particles. When compared to the process of rolling and cutting, shredding produces particles having superior bulk filling capacity, cigarette filling index and end stability. The thin, fibrous structure of shredded stem modifies the burn characteristics of the cigarette. Pressure drop and burn rate are reduced, nicotine delivery is enhanced, and, most importantly, carbon monoxide delivery is significantly reduced. These changes provide a significant potential for product improvement. The use of shredded stem has no effect on “tar” delivery. Replacing cut rolled stem with shredded stem has no detectable effect on the chemical composition of the tobacco or on the flavour characteristics of the cigarettes.

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Establishment of Nuclear Stock Collections for Apple and Pear in Latvia

Legumes, Paris. p. 202. Fridlung, P. R. (Ed.) (1989). Virus and Viruslike Diseases of Pome Fruits and Simulating Noninfectious Disorders. Cooperative Extension College of Agriculture and Home Economics Washington State University Pullman, Washington. 330 pp. Gugerli, P., Ramel, M. E. (2003). Production of monoclonal antibodies for the serological identification and reliable detection of apple stem pitting and pear yellow vein viruses in apple and pear. Acta Hortic., 657, 59-69. Howell, W. E., Burgess, J., Mink, G. I

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