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Martin Palúch

Abstract

The present study offers a critical reflection of contemporary Slovak authorial production. Focusing on three films, the author analyses the authors′ approaches to representing reality from a formal point of view. The author claims that all of them relativize the status of documentary film, using as a tool of critical analysis Carl Plantiga’s definition of documentary film, included in his concept of “asserted veridical representation”. The films under analysis use three formally different approaches of relating to social reality. One relies on an acted form, the second takes the form of a historicizing essay, and the third promotes the author’s subjective views through a cut collage of motifs stemming from reality.

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Vladimír Naxera and Petr Krčál

the historically first direct election in 2013. Equipped with a strong legitimacy stemming from the nation-wide popular vote, Zeman began to serve his function in office in a way that further polarized Czech society. Zeman actively intervened in political processes in a manner that did not correspond to a parliamentary regime or constitutionally determined powers ( Brunclík and Kubát 2016 ), thus destabilizing the Czech political scene. Furthermore, immediately after his election, he became highly active in the media and granted interviews to daily tabloid

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Olena Hrechyshkina and Maryia Samakhavets

merchandise exports in the international business environment is hindered by a number of limiting factors, which stem from the low level of product diversification (commodity-dependent exports have been identified) and geographical diversification (the Russian Federation remains the dominant foreign trade partner, although its share is decreasing). Therefore, we consider it advisable to intensify government support for export-oriented enterprises to expand their export geography, increase the attractiveness of sales conditions, grow sales, accelerate product turnover

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Alessandro Nanì and Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt

Abstract

Stemming from the concept of active audiences and from Henry Jenkins’ (2006) idea of participatory culture as the driving force behind the transformation of public service broadcasting into agencies of public service media (Bardoel, Ferrell Lowe 2007), this empirical study explores the attitude and behaviour of the audiences of two crossmedia projects, produced by the public service media of Finland (YLE) and Estonia (ERR). This empirical study aims to explore the behaviour, wants and needs of the audiences of cross-media productions and to shed some light on the conditions that support the dynamic switching of the engagement with cross-media. The study’s results suggest that audiences are neither passive nor active, but switch from one mode to another. The findings demonstrate that audience dynamism is circumstantial and cannot be assumed. Thus, thinking about active audiences and participation as the lymph of public service media becomes problematic, especially when broadcasters seek generalised production practices. This work demonstrates how television networks in general cannot be participatory, and instead, how cross-media can work as a vehicle of micro participation through small acts of audience engagement (Kleut et al. 2017).

Open access

Maria A. Arapova

Abstract

Although the smile is a universal facial expression, the use of smiles in communication varies across cultures. This may lead to misunderstandings and miscommunication. Both Americans and Europeans experience the same frustration and communication failure when they do not find smiling faces in Russia. At the same time, it is common for Russian people to perceive the smiles of Westerners as artificial and insincere. What is the reason for such a difference in perception? Why don’t Russians smile in some situations?

The study of the use of the smile as a non-verbal sign in a few chosen communicative contexts across Russian, European and American cultures showed the difference in its meaning and distribution according to the cultural tradition. The reason could stem from the difference of Russia’s history when compared to that of Western Europe, as well as in the specific restrictions in Russian Orthodox Christianity and the traditions of laughter in Russia. All the meanings and specific cases of distribution are clearly retained and expressed in the languages. If we compare the Russian улыбка and улыбаться with the English smile, we can see both common and distinctive semantic elements and different connotations.

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Sławomir Łodziński and Sergiusz Rudnicki

Abstract

The article tries to analyze the participation and political representation of the Polish minority in Ukraine and the Ukrainian minority in Poland in the period 1990-2015. Its meaning stems from at least several reasons. Firstly, because the both states officially accepted national minorities after 1990, they have introduced institutional arrangements of protection of their rights and have signed the major international documents in this area. Secondly, because the process of adaptation of European standards of minority protection took place in both countries in the situation of deep democratic changes and market reforms. Hence, the question of the role of minority policy in this has emerged. Thirdly, because the both countries are linked to one another because of a shared common history that sometimes divides societies and public opinion in these states and the political activity of both groups can increase or diminish these socio-political divisions. In the case of the Polish minority in Ukraine this article draws attention to the lack of political representation at country level and its limited activity as the Polish group at the local level (based on the Zhytomyr example). On the other hand in the case of the Ukrainian minority in Poland the article highlights the process of gradual decline of its political activity on the country level (as a result of the spatial dispersion of this group and the absence of a political partner on the country political scene) while we may observe its political activity at the local level.

Open access

Patrizia Garista, Erika Marie Pace, Margaret Barry, Paolo Contu, Barbara Battle-kirk and Giancarlo Pocetta

Abstract

Health promotion practice is characterised by a diverse workforce drawn from a broad range of disciplines, bringing together an extensive breadth of knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and values stemming from biomedical and social science frameworks. One of the goals of the CompHP Project was to ensure that higher education training would not only reach competency-based standards necessary for best practice, but also facilitate mobility within the EU and beyond through the accreditation of professional practitioners and educational courses. As a result, higher education institutions in Italy and elsewhere are requested to shift the focus from the definition of learning objectives to the identification of teaching strategies and assessment measures to guarantee that students have acquired the competencies identified. This requires reflection on the pedagogical models underpinning course curricula and teaching–learning approaches in higher education, not only to meet the competency-based standards but also to incorporate overarching transversal competencies inherent to the profession and, more specifically, to the online accreditation procedure. Professionals applying for registration require competence in foreign languages, metacognition and be digitally literate. The article provides a brief overview of the development and structure of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education online accreditation system and proposes a pedagogical reflection on course curricula.

Open access

P. P. Khoroshikh and A. A. Sergievich

-1855. Ethnographic research prior to Shternberg pp.134 - 157. Podmaskin, V. V. (2008). Folk knowledge of the Amur Evenkss. Russia and ATR. № 1. 88-101. Razumovskaya, V. (2014). Translating Aboriginal Siberian and Circumpolar Cultures in Russia. Translators, Interpreters, and Cultural Negotiators . pp. 190-212. Rosa, M., & Orey, D. C. (2017). STEM education in the brazilian context: An ethnomathematical perspective. STEM education in the junior secondary: The state of play (pp. 221-247) doi:10.1007/978-981-10-5448-8_11. Shelegina, O. N. (2006). Results

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Sheri Conklina, Beth Oyarzun and Daisyane Barreto

collaboration. Innovations in Education and Teaching International , 47(1), 9e24. Moore, M. G. (1993). 2 Theory of transactional distance. Theoretical principles of distance education, 22. National Center for Education Statistics (2014). STEM in Postsecondary Education (US Department of Education, Washington). New Media Consortium., & Consortium for School Networking. (2017). Horizon report . Austin, TX: The New Media Corsortium. Oyarzun, B., & Martin, F. (2013). A Case Study on Multi-Modal Course Delivery and Social Learning Opportunities. Bulletin

Open access

Tomasz Kamusella

used it for writing Kipchak, Slavic, or Turkish until the turn of the 20 th century. The Slavic Orthodox alphabet of Cyrillic – that stems from the Slavonic translation of the Bible – was adopted for writing Belarusian, Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian, or Ukrainian. The spread of the use of holy scripts for writing other than holy languages (vernaculars) is connected to empires or diasporas. The initial spread of the Latin script took place across the Roman Empire, then Charlemagne’s Frankish Empire took over this role, and subsequently the Holy Roman Empire, before