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Correlation of Body Perceptions and Eating Disorders of 9-12 years old Children in Bratislava

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to evaluate children in Bratislava, Slovakia. The survey sample consisted of 276 children aged 9 -12 who were tested using the Children’s Eating Attitude Test as a diagnostic tool for testing young people, who show a proclivity towards having eating issues, a possibility of anorexia, or a possible problem with bulimic tendencies. The study analyses the components of the test and the scores of children to whom it was administered, and come to conclusions as to its usefulness in diagnosing eating issues in children between grades 4 and 6. It also examines the comparisons between the children in Slovakia and the children in Australian studies in order to see if the scores correlate and what similarities and differences are present between the two groups studied.

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Child Creativity in the Context of Education at Standard and Alternative Schools in Slovakia

Abstract

The contribution gives a review of the research findings mapping (survey) the pupils’ creativity level. It provides information about education in alternative schools: Montessori, Waldorf and the Integrated Thematic Instruction (ITI), where the research was realised. The Torrance test (TTCT) and Urban test (TSD-Z) were used for the identification of pupils’ creativity. The procreative tendency of the teachers was examined by the Self-Rating Scale of the Creatively Oriented Personality (SRSCP). The comparison of pupils’ and teachers’ results from standard and alternative schools brought diverse results. Our findings regarding the creativity level of pupils attending the second grade of Montessori and Waldorf schools (N=50) in comparison with the children in standard schools suggest no significant differences. The pupils of the alternative classes of ITI (N= 206) achieved significantly higher scores of originality than those of standard schools (N=194). A link between the teachers’ creative orientation and their pupils’ creativity has not been found.

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Creativity and Motivation in Higher Education Teacher Training

Abstract

The main research subject of this study is a teacher. Our goal is to contribute to changes in teacher training in the direction of developing their motivation and creative potential, so that creative personalities of students could be subsequently developed. We chose the methodological concept of a natural developing experiment, in which we study the dynamics of changes in motivation and creativity of student teachers. In the scope of extensive research concept we used various methods to record scores before and after the experiment, such as IMB, DMV, IPOT, WKOPAY and Torrance Figural Test of Creative Thinking. The results were subjected to a quantitative evaluation by means of conventional statistical methods, such as the significance of differences in arithmetic means and index analysis. These were subjected to a qualitative analysis. As a result, conclusions were drawn from the study of future teachers' motivation and creativity. The results have shown significant arguments in favour of aimed and intensive motivational and creative development programmes. As it follows from our findings, interesting also for theories on educational process, the elimination of fear, anxiety, tension and teaching stress can humanise educational environment and also change motives for improving one's creative performance. The goal of our experiment is to contribute to the improvement of undergraduate teacher training and participate in progressive changes in the educational system.

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Psychometric Properties of the Slovak Version of sEMBU on General Adult Sample

Abstract

The factorial stability and reliability of the 23-item s(short)- EMBU previously demonstrated to be satisfactory in the samples of students from Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Italy (1999), East-Germany and Sweden (Arrindell et al., 2001). The Slovak translation of the original sEMBU was published in 2007 (Poliaková, Mojžišová, & Hašto, 2007). We decided to explore the psychometric properties of the translation of sEMBU on a general adult sample (N=970) in Slovakia, because the translated version of sEMBU is already utilized in research projects in Slovakia. The results show a very good alpha reliability of sEMBU. In the Slovak translation, we found similar scores of Rejection and Emotional warmth and Overprotection. A factor analysis with forced 3-factor solution sorted items to scales exactly as authors of sEMBU presupposed. Overprotection (father) has the highest share for classification and differentiation in the cluster. Emotional warmth (mother) has the highest share for classification and differentiation in the cluster. We discussed our results with the results from other studies and we suggest to continue in the research of the Slovak version of sEMBU focused on types of attachment, especially on the secure type of attachment.

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Giftedness as a Possible Risk of Bullying

Abstract

Introduction: The paper deals with a possible level of risk in cerebrally gifted pupils in relation to bullying at lower secondary schools and grammar schools. In terms of personality characteristics, gifted pupils form a very diverse group, but some research suggests that they might be a risky group concerning school bullying. In the Czech Republic, the most of cerebrally gifted pupils attend ordinary primary schools or grammar schools and they are in daily contact with other pupils. Due to ambiguous research results, there is a question if it is really possible to think of certain risks in the case of cerebrally gifted pupils in relation to their school environment. Quantitative research tried to answer these questions.

Methods: The research was focused on the perception of selected areas in the class social environment by the diagnosed cerebrally gifted pupils, the undiagnosed gifted ones and the ordinary pupil population. A quantitative research strategy for bullying incidence mapping in primary and grammar schools were determined. As a research tool, a questionnaire was chosen. Gathered data from the initial questionnaire were evaluated by the following methods: dispersion analysis (ANOVA) for data spread by Gauss curve, Kruskal-Wallis test for data with non-Gauss distribution, arithmetic mean, Pearson Chi-Square Test, correlation analysis and contingency tables.

Results: There are differences among the class climate in ordinary classes and the classes with diagnosed cerebrally gifted pupils and undiagnosed pupils. The comparison was at the level of schools, it means among primary schools and grammar schools. It was found out that the cerebrally gifted respondents repeatedly met some form of bullying.

Discussion: On the basis of the findings, the authors assumed that cerebrally gifted pupils (GP) represent a risky group in social interaction with their peers and are more prone to different symptoms of bullying. This has not been statistically confirmed. The overall score was similar in other groups.

Limitation: The views of teachers and the views of some psychologists suggest that within the GP group, there is a special group of GP that is not identifiable by traditional questionnaires. For further research, it is worthwhile to consider opting for such research methods that could reveal those pupils.

Conclusions: Based on these results, it is possible to support those authors who consider GP as a specific group with their own problems, different values and perceptions, but similar to their peers.

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Manager’s Personality and Their Professional Career

Abstract

Introduction:The research study deals with the personality of managers in regard to their professional career. The main objective of the study was to find the relationship between the personality dimensions according to the Big Five personality traits model and Holland’s typology of the six personality types and work environment types.

Methods:The research sample consisted of 121 managers from different levels of the subordinate system in state organizations and private companies in Slovakia. The personality dimensions Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness were in this research measured by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. We have also used the SDS questionnaire - Self-Directed Search to determine the personality types and work environment types - RIASEC codes. The statistical evaluation was performed using the SPSS 20 statistical system, with the data evaluated by methods of descriptive and correlation analysis.

Results:There were the highest values recorded in Conscientiousness throughout the research sample. The lowest values were recorded in Neuroticism. We found out that the Summary Code of managers is ESI (Enterprising, Social, Investigative), of male managers is EIR (Enterprising, Investigative, Realistic), of female managers is SEC (Social, Enterprising, Conventional). When comparing the individual RIASEC personality types, we found significant differences between males and females. Males are more realistic than females, more investigative and enterprising than females. Females are more social and conventional compared to males. There was no gender difference in artistic orientation. The RIASEC personality types in the entire sample match the RIASEC work environment types according to SDS, regardless of age. The results demonstrated relationships between the NEO - FFI personality dimensions and personality types and RIASEC work environment types codes according to SDS.

Discussion:We can say that managers in our research sample are primarily Enterprising types with leading life orientation. Typical representatives of this personality type are characterized especially by traits such as dominance, ambition, focus on success, self-confidence, sociability, and responsibility. In the context of a manager’s success and their effectiveness, or ineffectiveness in work environment, the most predictive Big Five factor for an effective manager is Neuroticism, all effective managers scored low in Neuroticism. Results obtained by the SDS questionnaire - Self-Directed Search confirm our findings of prevalent personality dimensions in the overall personality profile of managers. The overall RIASEC personality code of managers according to SDS is ESI in the whole research sample, thus we can conclude that in the case of the overall personality type - RIASEC code of manager the dominant personality type is Enterprising/leading, followed by the Social personality type and the third is the Investigative personality type.

Limitations:One of the methodological limitations of this research is the number of participants in the research sample. We do not consider this number as representative for the purpose of generalizing the results.

Conclusions:Research results show that there is a relationship between professional orientation and personality. Some personality dimensions are significantly related to professional orientation types and to professional interests, whereas others are related only non-significantly or not at all. Significant relations were found between the dimension Openness and Artistic, Leading, and Social type, between the dimension Extraversion and Enterprising and Investigative type, and between the dimension Agreeableness and the Social type. Realistic type was not related to any personality dimension. The dimension Neuroticism was negatively related to all professional types. For the career counseling practice and selection of job seekers and manager position applicants, this may mean that despite confirmation of these convergences, there may be different relations between different Holland’s professional types and personality dimensions.

These findings can be the focus of further research on students in their final year of secondary school when they are deciding on their future professional career.

This research study, we believe, has contributed to the understanding of the relationship between personality and professional career. The results confirm that professional orientation and personality interact and influence the professional behavior of a person.

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Gender Stereotypes and Elementary School Teachers

princesses: primary teachers’ accounts of children’s nonconforming behaviours. In: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, vol. 10, 2010, n. 4, p. 335-348. GREENWALD, A. G. - NOSEK, B. A. - BANAJI, M. R.: Understanding and using the Implicit Association Test: I. An improved scoring algorithm. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 85, 2003, n. 2, p. 197-216. KAHLE, J. B. - LAKES, M. K.: The myth of equality in science classrooms. In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, vol. 20, 1983, n. 2, p. 131

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Relations Among Poor Sleep, Anxiety and Depression Among the Students of Health Sciences

Abstract

The research in the area of health sciences students’ sleep quality and mood disorders is lacking in Lithuania, as well as other European countries. The aim of this study was to compare prevalence of poor sleep, anxiety and depression among the students according to the study programmes and to assess the relations among poor sleep, depression and anxiety. The study sample consisted of 672 Klaipeda State University of Applied Sciences students (95.5% were female), from 18 to 46 years of age. Sleep quality was evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, anxiety by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, sociodemographic questions were used. The chi-square test or Fisher exact test was used to estimate association between categorical variables. P-values less than 0.05 were interpreted as statistically significant. Poor sleep was more prevalent among Beauty Therapy (26.4%, 95% CI 22.2-30.56) and Nursing (21.3%, 95% CI 17.42 – 25.17) students, as compared with persons studying in Oral Health programmes (14.8%, 95% CI 11.46 – 18.17), p<0.05. Depression mean score was higher in Beauty Therapy students (4.76), as compared to Oral Health (3.69) students, p<0.05. Beauty Therapy (9.99) or Physiotherapy students (8.24) had higher anxiety mean score, as compared to Oral Health students (7.14), p<0.05. Anxiety mean score was significantly higher (8.45) among the ones with disturbed sleep, as compared to normally sleeping students (5.86), p<0.001. Depression mean score (4.77) was higher among the students having disturbed sleep, as compared to the students which sleep was not disturbed (2.87), p<0.001. Poor sleep and anxiety were more prevalent among the students aged 20 years and older as compared to the students, aged 18 and 19 years. Second and third year students more often had poor sleep or anxiety as compared to the first-year students. Poor sleep and anxiety were more common among Beauty Therapy and Physiotherapy students than among Oral Health Students. Among the students who slept poorly, symptoms of anxiety and depression were statistically significantly more frequent than those students whose sleep was not disturbed. Depression and anxiety mean scores were statistically significantly higher among the students who had poor sleep, as compared to the ones who had normal sleep, in all age and year of studying groups.

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Socioeconomic Characteristics, Oral Care Habits and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life among the Parents of Pre-School Children in Klaipėda

Abstract

There is a lack of data about oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among the parents of pre-school children, especially in Lithuania and the relationships among socio-economic status, oral care habits and OHRQoL. Research questions: is OHRQoL influenced by socioeconomic status or oral care habits? Research focus – oral health-related quality of life among the parents of pre-school children. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships among socioeconomic status, oral care habits and oral helath-related quality of life among the parents of pre-school children in Klaipeda. The study sample consisted of 375 parents (mother or father) of pre-school children. The questionnaire survey was conducted at randomly selected 23 kindergartens in Klaipeda city. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic and oral care habits questions. All the participants were examined by self-administered OIDP questionnaire, which measured oral impacts on physical, psychological and social aspects of daily performances. The highest overall impact on OHRQoL among the parents of pre-school children was observed in the domain of Carrying out major work or role (73.0), the lowest one in the Eating and enjoying food (25.74) domain. Mean OIDP score was significantly higher among the parents whose socioeconomic status was low (35.44), reflecting poorer OHRQoL, as compared with high (8.07) socioeconomic status. Parents with poor oral care habits significantly more frequently were affected (79.2%) in Smiling, laughing domain, as compared to the parents whose oral care habits were good (20.8%). Lower socioeconomic status and poorer oral care habits were related with worsened oral health-related quality of life, especially in the area of psychological performances.

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