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Adelina-Alexandra Stoica

Abstract

The main purpose of this paper is to measure the impact that homophily, structural characteristics of the networks, number of citations of the alters and their Hirsch score have on the number of citations of an ego. I have chosen co-authorship networks as a subject of research because they have a great influence on knowledge and on the diffusion of ideas. The studied populations are represented by full-time academics affiliated to sociology departments in Romania, Poland and Slovenia. Ego-network analysis was used as research design. The data was analyzed using linear hierarchical regression. For all three populations the average number of citations of the alter has a considerable positive impact on the number of citations of the ego. Conversely, the Hirsch score of the alter has a negative impact on the number of citations of the ego. The data analyzed in this article claims that the assumptions about the positive impact of alter citations, network size and the betweenness score on the number of the authors citations are supported empirically.

Open access

Adrian Duşa and Valeriu Frunzaru

. Bucureşti: Editura Economică. Cook, C., Heath, F., Thomson, R.L. and B. Thomson (2001) Score Reliability in Web- or Internet-Based Surveys: Unnumbered Graphic Rating Scales Versus Likert-Type Scales. Educational and Psychological Measurement , 61(4):697-706. Dawes, J. (2008) Do Data Characteristics Change According to the Number of Scales Points Used? An Experiment using a 5-point, 7-point and 10-point scales. International Journal of Market Research , 50(1):66-77. Finn, R.H. (1972) Effects of some variations in rating scale characteristics on the

Open access

Tudor Raț

Abstract

This paper introduces a simple mathematical algorithm for identifying the nodes that will most likely act as re-coagulants once the ‘key-players’ are removed. By comparing the difference between in-degree and out-degree centrality scores (assuming that the relational data are directed) and comparing that value with the overall degree score, one can infer where a node sits on the ‘sink-source’ continuum. Furthermore, assuming that the nodes will not change their behavior patterns as a result of the prior ‘intervention’, this algorithm could indicate whether the nodes will act as relational ‘magnets’ (will attract new ties) or as ‘leeches’ (will seek to attach themselves to other nodes).

Open access

Bianca Elena Mihăilă

Abstract

The aim of this article is to contribute to the discussion about whether the scientific impact of an academic researcher (measured through bibliometrics indices as Hirsch score, citation scores or quantitative data about publications) can be accounted for by the presence of co-authors and the characteristics of the personal networks they are embedded in. With my study, I intend to demonstrate that there is statistical evidence between international co-authorship, measured through the number and the characteristics of international co-authors and the scientific impact of the researcher. Recent studies using bibliometrics and scientometrics approach shows that papers published with international co-authors may result in a higher citation rate than the ones written in a purely national manner (with national co-authors) (Glanzel & Schubert, 2001; Schmoch & Schubert, 2008). In the literature that addresses these issues, the main focus is put on international co-authorship, but my opinion is that the concept has undergone a series of methodological changes. I address these changes as a trend towards a transnational perspective. I explored the personal networks of university researchers, from three academic communities in the field of sociology. I analyzed the data using hierarchical regression models. This article is based on secondary data analysis starting from the data Hâncean used in 2016 (Hâncean & Perc, 2016). The data provided attribute and relational data for the focal nodes and their corresponding alters from Web of Science platform. Given the theoretical framework proposed by previous research (Adams, 2012; Hâncean & Perc, 2014; Glanzel & Schubert, 2004), I expected the scientific impact of an author to be positively influenced by the impact of the personal network he is embedded in. After running the analysis, the presence of transnational co-authors has a moderate impact on the citation distribution, especially for the Romania case. The biggest impact on the citation distribution, for all academic communities I included in the analysis, are the number of publications and the average number of co-authors’ citations. The description and the exploration of the data in all three communities of academic sociologists (Romania, Poland and Slovenia) will be used later in order to show new ways in which knowledge is transferred through the lens of a transnational perspective.

Open access

Iulian Oană

Abstract

Studies based on bibliometric records have introduced the idea of ‘rhythmicity’ when it comes to the publication of research articles. However, the main approach of this particular topic was to analyze journal specific data on rates of manuscript and review submissions. This study takes another path, by analyzing aspects of publication rhythmicity based not on individual, attribute data, but taking into account the fact that publication of research results and the efforts leading to a certain manuscript are often collective endeavors. Thus, co-authorship ego networks are interpreted through the theoretical lenses of ‘social time’ (for temporality), and ‘homophily’ and ‘preferential attachment’ (for network characteristics). For this article, the same data analyzed by M.-G. Hâncean and M. Perc in their 2016 article, Homophily in coauthorship networks of East European sociologists, were used. The data was based on Web of Science bibliometric records for three populations of academic sociologists, from Poland, Romania and Slovenia, and their co-authors. The purpose was to see if the publishing rhythm of an author (i.e., ego) is influenced by the publishing rhythm of her co-authors (i.e., alters) and by the structural characteristics of her ego-network. Rhythmicity was measured as the sum of standard deviations from the mean for the number of articles published between 2006 and 2016, resulting in a score which characterizes egos and alters as constant or irregular in their publishing activity. Results suggest that the structural features of the co-authorship networks can give us certain insights for the rhythmicity of publications. Mainly, structural features of network size, density and node betweenness explain more the variation of egos’ constancy or irregularity in (non)publication than the rhythmicity of their co-authors.

Open access

Knut Petzold and Hannah Bucher

. 2014b. Intra-European Student Mobility in International Higher Education Circuits. Europe on the Move . London: Palgrave Macmillan. Van Mol, Christof, and Christiane Timmerman. 2014. “Should I Stay or Should I Go? An Analysis of the Determinantis of Intra-European Student Mobility.” Population, Space and Place 20 (5): 465-79. Waibel, Stine, Knut Petzold, and Heiko Rüger. 2018. “Occupational Status Benefits of Studying Abroad and the Role of Occupational Specificity – A Propensity Score Matching Approach.” Social Science Research doi: 10.1016/j