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English for Academic Purposes: A need for remodelling

. Carter, R., & McCarthy, M. (1995). Grammar and the spoken language. Applied Linguistics 16 (2), 141-158. Cheshire, J. (1999). Spoken standard English. In T. Bex & R. J. Watts (Eds.), The Widening Debate (pp. 129-148). London Routledge. Cho, Y., & Bridgeman, B. (2012). Relationship of TOEFL iBT® scores to academic performance: Some evidence from American universities. Language Testing, 29 (3), 421-442. Cotton, F., & Conrow, F. (1998). An investigation of the predictive validity of IELTS amongst a group of international students at the University of

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Self-Assessed Metacognitive Awareness among Students of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract

Metacognition consists of knowledge of cognition (metacognitive knowledge) and regulation of cognition (metacognitive regulatory skills). The growing emphasis on student/learner-centered teaching at various educational levels including universities has led to recommendations for increased use of metacognitive strategies in traditional classrooms and online classrooms. This study examined metacognitive awareness among university students. The study population included 210 undergraduates and postgraduates studying biology or genetics among their regular courses in the university. Participants provided responses to the 52-item Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) instrument that captures self-assessed level of agreement to items assessing metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive regulatory skills. We conducted statistical analysis on the data collected. Mean self-assessed MAI scores was 79.9% (41.6/52), with metacognitive regulation scores of 80.1% (28.0/35) higher than metacognitive knowledge. Metacognitive awareness tends to decrease with level of study. Metacognitive regulation associated significantly with level of study (p=0.0127) or level of study and field of biology together (p=0.005). Students think highly of their metacognitive awareness especially in the regulation of cognition and this self-belief tended to reduce with year of study. The results provide baseline for future studies and global comparisons.

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Assessing the inter-coder reliability of the Body Type Dictionary (BTD)

. Artstein, Ron and Massimo Poesio. 2007. Inter-coder agreement for computational linguistics. Computational Linguistics 34: 555-596. Bick, Esther. 1968. Experience of the skin in early object relations. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis 49: 484-486. Buchanan, Tom. 2002. One assessment: Desirable or dangerous? Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 33: 148-154. Buck, Lucien A. and Michael Barden. 1971. Body image scores and varieties of consciousness. Journal of Personality Assessment 35: 309

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The assessment of Bosnian EFL learners’ knowledge by two different measures: test and writing assignment

References Anderson, John R. (1983). The architecture of cognition . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Bacha, Nahla (2001). Writing evaluation: what can analytic versus holistic essay scoring tell us? System 29: 371–383. Bialystok, Ellen (1982). On the relationship between knowing and using forms. Applied Linguistics 3: 181–206. Brumfit, Christofer J. (1984). Communicative Methodology in Language Teaching. Cambridge University Press. Chandler, Jean (2000). The efficacy of error correction for improvement in the accuracy

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in ExELL
Traditional Models Used in Evaluation of Requests for Credit Card and Alternatives (AHP)

References Akhavein, J., W.S. Frame and L.J. White, “The difufusion of financial innovation; An excamination of adoption of small bussines credit scoring by large Banking organization”, The journal of bussines, 78(2), 2005, p.577-596. Bugera. Vladimir, Hiroshi Konno ve Stanislav Uryasev, “Credit Cards Scoring With Quadratic Utility Function”, Risk Management and Financial Engineering Lab Center For Applied Optimization, University of Florida, January 15, 2002. p.2. Chung, H. M., and Gray.P, “Special Section

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Instructional DVD video lesson with code switching: its effect on the performance level in dancing social dance among grade 10 special program in the art students of the Philippines

Abstract

This paper shows that the experimental group who are exposed to DVD Video Lesson that uses code switching language has an average mean score in the pretest of 1.56, and this increased to an average mean of 3.50 in the posttest. The control group that uses DVD Video Lesson that uses purely English language got an average mean of 1.06 in the pretest and increased to 1.53 in the posttest. Based on the results of the performance posttest taken by the two groups, the experimental group has a dramatic increase in scores from the pretest to posttest. Although both groups had increased in their performance scores from pretest to posttest, the experimental group (code switching language) performs well in the posttest than the control group. As revealed in this findings , there is a significant difference in the posttest scores between the experimental group who are exposed to DVD lesson that uses code switching as a medium of instruction and the control group who are exposed to DVD lesson that uses English. The students who are exposed to the Video Lesson that uses code switching perform well than those students who are exposed in DVD video lesson that uses purely English language. DVD Video lesson that uses code switching as a medium of instruction in teaching social dance is the useful approach in teaching Grade 10 Special Program in the Art students. The language used (code switching) is the powerful medium of instruction that enhances the learning outcomes of the students to perform well. This paper could be an eye opener to the Department of Education to inculcate the used of first language/local language or MTB-MLE, not only in Grade I to III but all level in K to 12 programs, since education is a key factor for building a better nation.

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Assessing Residents’ Satisfaction with Planning and Neighbourhood Facilities of Some Public Housing Estates in Benin City, Nigeria

Abstract

The objective of the study is to analytically assess the residents’ perception of planning of six housing estates and their satisfaction levels in Benin City, Edo state, Nigeria. The population of the study comprises all residents of the six housing estates in Benin City as at 2018 which is the study period. The data were collected from the six (6) estates covered by this study: Oluku Housing Estate, EDPA Housing Estates Ugbowo, Federal Housing Estate, Oregbeni, Federal Housing Estate on Ikpoba Hill, Iyekogba Housing Estate, Ebo Village, and Andrew Wilson Housing Estate, Evbuoriaria. A total of 1200 copies of questionnaires were administered across the six housing estates. However, the total response rate of 1000 was achieved as only these copies of questionnaires were retrieved in usable format. Descriptive statistical tools such as means, standard deviations, kruskal-willis test and categorical regression analysis were utilized for the data analysis. The result showed that the relative satisfaction index scores for the all the estates are on the fairly satisfied region (RSI: 2.1-3.0) and this implies that residents are fairly satisfied with the estate planning conditions. The Kruskal-willis test confirms the absence of any significant differences in RSI scores across the estates while the categorical regression analysis results shows that estate planning has a positive effect on residents satisfaction and this is significant at 5% (p=0.003) which implies improvement in estate planning results in higher satisfaction levels. The study recommends the need for Government policy to encourage a decent living environment in terms of planning of estates.

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Foreign-language teaching and studying in Chilean and Finnish classrooms as seen by teachers

Abstract

This article reports Chilean and Finnish foreign-language (FL) teachers’ perceptions of teaching and study realities in their own FL classrooms. Communicative language teaching (CLT) is used as the teaching–studying–learning methodological framework of an international KIELO project (= the acronym for Finnish “kieltenopetus” meaning “language teaching”), whose online survey was used to collect data for this article. We aim at answering the following research question: What are the FL teachers’ main approaches to teaching and studying in Chilean and Finnish FL classrooms and what is the FL classroom teaching and study reality like in these two countries? The data were collected from 83 Chilean and 147 Finnish FL teachers through an online survey covering 15 key themes of CLT and including 115 Likert-scale statements and 8 open-ended questions. In the descriptive data analysis, both Chilean and Finnish FL teachers claim that they encourage their students to use the target language considerably and that they use communicative oral tasks. For both groups of participants, however, teacher-centeredness and use of textbook score relatively high. The two-cluster analysis revealed a context-dependent cluster and a context-independent cluster. Context-dependent teachers tended to favor communicative oral tasks, real-life tasks and their own language tasks, whereas context-independent teachers favored more non-communicative tasks. Context-dependent teachers proved more student-centered than context-independent teachers. For Chilean and Finnish research participants, the use of mother tongue in foreign language classrooms appears to be an issue despite the growing need of foreign language communication.

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