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Ljubica Matek

. Kindle Edition. Kelman, Susanne. “Ishiguro in Toronto.” Conversations with Kazuo Ishiguro . Ed. Brian. W. Shaffer and Cynthia. F. Wong. Jackson: UP of Mississippi, 2008. 42-51. Mason, Gregory, and Kazuo Ishiguro. “An Interview with Kazuo Ishiguro.” Contemporary Literature 30.3 (1989): 335-347. Molino, Michael R. “Traumatic Memory and Narrative Isolation in Ishiguro’s A Pale View of Hills .” Critique 53 (2012): 322–336. Phelan, James. Living to Tell about It . Ithaca: Cornell UP, 2005. Ravenstein, Ernst Georg. “The Laws of Migration

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Adriana Elena Stoican

. “The Children of 1965: Allegory, Postmodernism, and Jhumpa Lahiri’s ‘The Namesake.” Twentieth-Century Literature 53.3 (2007): 345-70. Web. 1 Oct. 2011. Stoican, A. Elena. “European Allegiances in the Context of South Asian American Transnational Migration.” Shakespeare, Translation and the European Dimension . Ed. M.-S. Draga Alexandru, Nicolaescu Mădălina, Oana Alis Zaharia. Bucharest: ProUniversitaria, 2012. 241-258. Stephen Vertovec. Transnationalism Key Ideas. London and New York: Routledge2009. Online Newspaper/Magazine Articles Duque

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Alessandra Rizzo

Lygo, E. (eds). 2013. The Art of Accommodation. Literary Translation in Russia. Oxford and Bern: Peter Lang. CALL ME BY MY NAME. Stories from Calais and beyond (London Refugee Week, 2017). The Migration Museum at The Workshop. 26 Lambeth High Street, London. Catenaccio, P. 2015. “Repertori retorici e negoziazione culturale nei racconti di vita di rifugiati. Lingua Franca e implicazioni ideologiche”. In: Guido, M.G. (ed.). Lingue e Linguaggi, vol. 16. Università del Salento, pp. 111-138. Clifford, J. 1997. Routes. Travel

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Ksenia Nikitina

Abstract

The following paper is devoted to the study of speech manipulation technologies in US political media discourse. A number of web-based articles have been taken under consideration for this study. They demonstrate the problem arising from the refugee flow in Europe and create a special “image” of the complicated European situation. It is helpful to see how the situation appears in the Internet media since this type of mass communication is most influential these days. While considering a large amount of media texts, a special speech manipulation technology has been revealed. This phenomenon demonstrates a distinct structure and close interrelations of purposefully selected elements. Going through a number of stages we can find out the technology of speech manipulation – a system of using the aggregate of speech manipulation instruments in order to purposefully guide the reality perception of the mass audience. The external level of the texts enables us to take a penetrating look at the internal intentions. This knowledge will help us not to confuse the migration crisis as it is and the migration crisis as it seems.

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Elizabeth Kella

Abstract

This article examines the affective terrain of Poland, Canada, and the US in Eva Hoffman’s autobiographical account of her migration and exile in Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language (1989), the text that launched Hoffman’s reputation as a writer and intellectual. Hoffman’s Jewish family left Poland for Vancouver in 1959, when restrictions on emigration were lifted. Hoffman was 13 when she emigrated to Canada, where she lived until she went to college in the US and began her career. Lost in Translation represents her trajectory in terms of “Paradise,” “Exile,” and “The New World,” and the narrative explicitly thematizes nostalgia. While Hoffman’s nostalgia for post-war Poland has sometimes earned censure from critics who draw attention to Polish anti-Semitism and the failings of Communism, this article stresses how Hoffman’s nostalgia for her Polish childhood is saturated with self-consciousness and an awareness of the politics of remembering and forgetting. Thus, Hoffman’s work helps nuance the literary and critical discourse on nostalgia. Drawing on theories of nostalgia and affect developed by Svetlana Boym and Sara Ahmed, and on Adriana Margareta Dancus’s notion of “affective displacement,” this article examines Hoffman’s complex understanding of nostalgia. It argues that nostalgia in Lost in Translation is conceived as an emotion which offers the means to critique cultural practices and resist cultural assimilation. Moreover, the lyricism of Hoffman’s autobiography becomes a mode for performing the ambivalence of nostalgia and diasporic feeling.

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Ching-Huan Lin

Abstract

This article focuses on the rising hostility against immigrants / refugees and growing demand for hospitality, in both regional and transnational senses, in Caryl Phillips’s novel A Distant Shore, set in a local place in North England. I think that the author, in examining the parallel conditions of being a stranger in a village and an outsider to the nation, shows that the demands of hospitality are similarly urgent whether sought by nationals or foreigners though these are calibrated differently in terms of scales of belonging. My broader argument is that hospitality is an ethical practice of everyday life that requires continual renegotiation. Inspired by Levinasian ethics, I turn to Derrida’s and Rosello’s meditations on hospitality, which emphasise the metaphorical nature of the host-guest relationship and the tension it inscribes between the finiteness of politics and the infinity of ethics. By exploring the complex relationship between politics and ethics as this is made manifest in the literary representations of ordinary British citizens’ everyday practices, I suggest that this novel not only deals with the UK’s domestic tensions of multiculturalism and ethnic conflict, but also critically reflects on its bewildered (but hardly new) attitude toward the ongoing transnational integration of the new Europe in the postwar period.

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Dana Radler

.” Journal of the Short Story in English 41 (2003). Web. 15 May 2013. Fitzgerald, Patrick and Brian Lambkin. Migration in Irish History: 1607-2007 . Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. Frank, Soren. Migration and Literature: Gunther Grass, Milan Kundera, Salman Rushdie and Jan Kjaerstad . New York: Pagrave Macmillan, 2008. Grinberg, Leon and Rebeca Grinberg. “Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Migration.” Psychoanalysis and Culture: A Kleinian Perspective . Ed. David Bell. London & New York: Karnac, 1999. 154-169. McCarthy, Dermot

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Roxana Elena Doncu

Abstract

Postcolonial writers like Salman Rushdie often write back to the “empire” by appropriating myth and allegory. In The Ground beneath Her Feet, Rushdie rewrites the mythological story of Orpheus and Eurydice, using katabasis (the trope of the descent into Hell) to comment both on the situation of the postcolonial writer from a personal perspective and to attempt a redefinition of postcolonial migrant identity-formation. Hell has a symbolic function, pointing both to the external context of globalization and migration (which results in the characters’ disorientation) and to an interior space which can be interpreted either as a source of unrepressed energies and creativity (in a Romantic vein) or as the space of the abject (in the manner of Julia Kristeva). The article sets out to investigate the complex ways in which the Orphic myth and katabasis are employed to shed light on the psychology of the creative artist and on the reconfiguration of identity that becomes the task of the postcolonial migrant subject. The journey into the underworld functions simultaneously as an allegory of artistic creation and identity reconstruction.

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Anca-Luminiţa Iancu

. Transcultural Imaginings: Translating the Other, Translating the Self in Narratives about Migration and Terrorism . Sofia: KX: Critique and Humanism, 2016. Gray, Jeffrey. “Essence and the Mulatto Traveler: Europe as Embodiment in Nella Larsen’s ‘Quicksand’.” NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction 27.3 (Spring 1994): 257-270. Harrison-Kahan, Lori. “‘Drunk with the Fiery Rhythms of Jazz’: Anzia Yezierska, Hybridity, and the Harlem Renaissance.” Modern Fiction Studies 51.2 (2005): 416-436. Hart, Betty L., and Anna A. Moore. “Nella Larsen.” American Ethnic Writers . Rev

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Janna Houwen

-582. Sontag, Susan. On Photography . New York: Farrar, 1977. Silverman, Kaja. The Threshold of the Visible World. New York: Routledge, 1996. Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty. “Translator’s Preface and Afterword to Mahasweta Devi, ‘Imaginary Maps.’” The Spivak Reader. Ed. D. Landry and G. MacLean. New York: Routledge, 1996. 267-86. Terry, Fiona. Condemned to Repeat?: The Paradox of Humanitarian Action. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 2002. Vium, Christian. “Icons of Becoming: Documenting Undocumented Migration from West Africa to Europe.” Cahiers d