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Michael D’Angeli

References Central Statistics Office. Press Release Census 2011 Profile 6 Migration and Diversity. Web CSO, 4 Oct. 2012. Web. 2 Mar. 2014. Office for National Statistics. Polish People in the UK-Half a Million Polish Residents. Web ONS, 25 Aug. 2011. Web. 2 Mar. 2014.

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Barry Murnane

Abstract

One of the key questions facing Gothic Studies today is that of its migration into and out of its once familiar generic or symbolic modes of representation. The BBC series In the Flesh addresses these concerns against the background of a neoliberal medical culture in which pharmaceutical treatments have become powerful tools of socio-economic normalization, either through inducing passivity or in heightening productivity, generating chemically adapted biomachines tuned to think and produce. But the pharmakon has always been a risky form of normalization, its poisonous mechanisms threatening to undo its helpful patterns by stealth. This essay discusses the pharmacological and medical contexts of the series in which zombies are subjected to medical management and normalized as “PDS sufferers,” thereby locating In the Flesh in terms of an already gothicized neoliberal pharmacology of everyday life. It also enquires how the proximity of the symbolic pharmacology of the series to neoliberal medical discourses and practices actually challenges traditional representational patterns of the Gothic and whether the Gothic can still have a role as an alternative cure to society’s ills.

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Alessandra Rizzo

Abstract

This study, drawing upon contemporary theories in the field of migration, postcolonialism, and translation, offers an analysis of literary works by Monica Ali (of Bangladeshi origins) and Jhumpa Lahiri (of Bengali Indian parents). Ali and Lahiri epitomize second-generation immigrant literature, play with the linguistic concept of translating and interpreting as forms of hybrid connections, and are significant examples of how a text may become a space where multi-faceted identities co-habit in a process of deconstructing and reconstructing their own sense of emplacement in non-native places.

Each immigrant text becomes a hybrid site, where second- and third generations of immigrant subjects move as mobile, fluctuating and impermanent identities, caught up in the act of transmitting their bicultural and bilingual experience through the use of the English language as their instrument of communication in a universe which tends to marginalize them.

This investigation seeks to demonstrate how Ali and Lahiri represent two different migrant experiences, Muslim and Indian, each of which functioning within a multicultural Anglo-American context. Each text is transformed into the lieu where identities become both identities-intranslation and translated identities and each text itself may be looked at as the site of preservation of native identities but also of the assimilation (or adaptation) of identity. Second-generation immigrant women writers become the interpreters of the old and new cultures, the translators of their own local cultures in a space of transition.

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Cristina-Georgiana Voicu

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Isabel Alonso-Breto

References Alonso-Breto, Isabel, “‘Enormous Cracks, Towering Mountains’: The Displacement of Migration as Intimate Violence in Sri Lanka-Australia Migration Narratives.” South Asian Review, 2012 33. 3: 125-138. Print. Barbour, John D. “Edward Said and the Space of Exile.” Theology & Literature, 2007 21.3: 203-301. Print. Chetty, Rajendra. “Exile and Return in Farida Karodia’s Other Secrets.” Indias Abroad: The Diaspora Writes Back. Ed. Rajendra Chetty and Pier Paolo Piciucco. STE Publishers: Johannesburg, 2004

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Elena Rodríguez Murphy

-Colonial Literatures. Lon don/New York: Routledge, 1989. Print. Bandia, P. F. “Translocation: Translation, Migration and The Relocation of Cultures.” A Companion to Translation Studies. Eds. S. Bermann and C. Porter. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. 273-284. Print. ---. “An Interview with Professor Paul Bandia.” Interview by Elena Rodriguez Murphy. Perspectives. Studies in Translatology, vol. 23, no. 1. 2015: 143-154. Print. Bhabha, Homi. The Location of Culture. London/New York: Routledge, 1994. Print. Brancato