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Agnieszka Czech Rogoyska and Magdalena Zboch

Abstract

Needless to say, words originating in English largely influence other languages. As postulated by Plümer [2000, p. 28], since the nineteenth century English has become the main donor language for German and due to the ongoing influx of Anglicisms used in German both in Fachsprache, i.e. German for specific purposes and on a daily basis, lexical interference between the two languages increases. Some linguists oppose the excessive use of words originating in English postulating that as a consequence, German may become a peripheral language, whereas others posit that it indicates openness to world and language development. The study focuses on the application of Anglicisms in German newspapers in February 2016. The corpus encompasses 90 articles in online versions of three newspapers, viz. Die Welt, Der Spiegel and Der Stern, structured into three categories, be it Beauty, Politics, and IT. Every category covered thirty parallel topics, in order to arrive at a succinct yet comprehensive summary of the total ratio of Anglicisms. The article was divided into four main categories, i.e. theoretical framework, quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and concluding remarks.

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Marian Zhytaryuk and Victoria Zhytaryuk

Abstract

This article presents the analysis of thematic, historical and political spectrums of the “Ukrainian” content in the German newspapers and magazines of the interwar period. As a source base for this scientific work the authors analyze the newspaper and magazine journalism of that time, which allows not only to keep certain historical episodes (konstatives), but also (in some way) to reflect the views, needs, intentions, challenges, promises as well as German political and social factors in terms of disillusionment of Ukrainian patriotic forces (performatives). Nazism and Bolshevism skillfully used propaganda to achieve predatory targets, therefore it should be a lesson for the future generations, also the importance of conceptional media in Ukraine and Poland should increase.

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Agnieszka Czech-Rogoyska and Magdalena Krawiec

References BAJEROWA I. 1980. Wpływ techniki na ewolucję języka. Kraków. CARSTENSEN, B. 1965. Englische Einflüsse auf die deutsche Sprache nach 1945. In: Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter. CARSTENSEN, B., GALINSKY, H. 1975. Amerikanismen in der deutschen Gegenwartssprache, Heidelberg: Winter. CARSTENSEN B. 1980. Gender of English loanwords in German. - Studia Linguistica Posnaniensia 12. pp. 3-25. FINK, H. 1970. Amerikanismen im Wortschatz der

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Agnieszka Czech-Rogoyska and Magdalena Krawiec

References CZECH-ROGOYSKA, A., KRAWIEC, M . 2018. IT-Related Anglicisms in Der Spiegel: A Semantic Analysis. [in:] Social Communication. Online Journal, Volume 4(1) pp. 12–24. CZECH-ROGOYSKA, A., ZBOCH, M . 2016. Anglicisms in online German newspapers and magazines. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of articles in ‘Die Welt’, ‘Der Spiegel’, and ‘Der Stern’ in February 2016. [in:] Social Communication. Online Journal, Volume 1, pp. 25–58. BURMASOVA, S . (2010). Empirische Untersuchung der Anglizismen im Deutschen: am Material der Zeitung

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Iurii Melnyk

verzögerte überregionale Berichterstattung: der Fehler im System. MEEDIA. Abgerufen von goo.gl/LnuV1V Sexuelle Übergriffe am Kölner Hauptbahnhof 2015/2016 [Video file]. (2016, Januar 7). Youtube.com. Abgerufen von goo.gl/hYgmer KARNITSCHNIG M. (2016, Januar 20). Cologne puts Germany’s ‘lying press’ on defensive. Politiko. Abgerufen von goo.gl/k6ycE6 LANE O. (2016, Januar 25). Four Weeks On From Cologne, The Media Is Still Hiding Details Of Migrant Assaults. Breitbart News. Retrieved from goo.gl/WPf33G GRENIER

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Grzegorz Rachwał

Abstract

The aim of this article is to characterize the German minority press market in Poland in the period of 1989-2017. The article constitutes a discussion regarding terms that are key for the undertaken subject, i.e., “national minority”, “ethnic minority” and “the press of national and ethnic minorities”; furthermore, a typology of the functions of these media is presented. The analysis covered the socio-political framework of the functioning of minority media, as well as legal regulations at the level of publishing activities of national and ethnic minorities and the support of the Polish state towards publishing initiatives of minorities from 1989 to the present day. The article also constitutes an overview of German minority press issued in 1989 - 2017 in the Polish state. Characteristics of the periodicals contain information about their creation, presentation of graphic layout and publishing formula, as well as the thematic profile of the published contents. Approximating the German minority in Poland, the author attempts to answer the question of what role the German press once played in the Polish German society, and what is its role today, as well as who are the recipients of the German press in Poland today, what is its current condition and what are the prognoses for its development in the short and longer term. The conducted research applied technical analysis and analysis of press content. The study uses a number of sources. These include state documents published in journals of law, in various types of bulletins, reviews and in the on-line version.

Open access

Julia Roll and Sven-Ove Horst

Abstract

Today, opera houses are confronted by new (global) digital media offers that enable people to remain outside the opera house while attending a live-opera, e.g. via livestreamed opera performances in the cinema. This is a challenge for media managers in these fields because they need to find new ways to work with these new opportunities. Within a cultural marketing context, branding is highly relevant. Based on the brand image approach by Kevin Lane Keller (1993), we use a complex qualitative-quantitative study in order to investigate if, and how, the brand images of live-opera performances and live-streamed operas differ between countries and cultural contexts. By comparing Estonia and Germany, we found that the perception of live-opera is rather a global phenomenon with only slight differences. Furthermore, the ‘classical’ opera performance in an opera house is still preferred, with a corresponding willingness to pay, while the live-streamed opera offer may provide a modern touch. The study may help media managers in adapting their brand management to include new digital product offers and to find targeted differentiation strategies for increasingly competitive markets.

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Tzvetomila Pauly

Abstract

The article discusses the cinematic representations of the post-Soviet individual in two internationally acclaimed Nordic films, namely, Aki Kaurismäki’s Take Care of Your Scarf, Tatiana (Pidä huivista kiinni, Tatjana, Finland/Germany, 1994) and Lukas Moodysson’s Lilya 4-Ever (Lilja 4-ever, Sweden/Denmark, 2002). The guiding premise is that the films represent cross-cultural inquiries on identity and otherness that reflect and challenge the (male) gaze of the West European North upon the (female) post-Soviet East soon after the collapse of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe.

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Jarmo Valkola

Abstract

Aki Kaurismäki is arguably the best-known Finnish filmmaker, owing largely to his feature films such as Crime and Punishment (Rikos ja rangaistus, Finland, 1983), Calamari Union (Finland, 1985), Shadows in Paradise (Varjoja paratiisissa, Finland, 1986), Hamlet Goes Business (Hamlet liikemaailmassa, Finland, 1987), Ariel (Finland, 1988), The Match Factory Girl (Tulitikkutehtaan tyttö, Finland, 1990), I Hired a Contract Killer (Finland/ Sweden, 1990), La vie de bohéme (Finland/France/ Sweden/Germany, 1992), Take Care of Your Scarf, Tatiana (Pidä huivista kiinni, Tatjana, Finland/Germany, 1994), Drifting Clouds (Kauas pilvet karkaavat, Finland, 1996), Juha (Finland, 1999), The Man Without a Past (Mies vailla menneisyyttä, Finland, 2002), Lights in the Dusk (Laitakaupungin valot, Finland, 2006) and Le Havre (Finland/France, 2011). A large body of his work has been made in Finland, but also in countries like France and Great Britain. Besides feature films, he has also made documentaries and short films, as well as musical films with the group Leningrad Cowboys. In a broader context, Kaurismäki has a unique place in Finnish and international film history, as well as in media and communication culture. Kaurismäki’s cultural context includes elements that have been turned into national and transnational symbols of social communication and narrative interaction by his stylisation. The director’s cinematic strategy investigates and makes choices evoking a social understanding of characters that has special communicative value. Kaurismäki’s films have been scrutinised for over thirty years.

Open access

Liisa Kaljula

Abstract

This article looks at What Happened to Andres Lapeteus? (Mis juhtus Andres Lapeteusega, Estonia, 1966), a film that marked the directing debut of Russian-Estonian theatre and film director Grigori Kromanov, as a cinematographic narrative that follows the development of a homo sovieticus. The concept of homo sovieticus, initially simply an ironic reference to the “New Soviet Man” promoted in the official Soviet vocabulary, was elaborated in the 1980s and 1990s by several thinkers and writers from Eastern Europe into a concept allowing for a more analytical description of the bureaucratic human type that developed under the Soviet regime. The German- American philosopher Hannah Arendt in her renowned The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951) found that the juridical, the moral, and the individual in a man could most effectively be killed in concentration camps. The Russian philosopher Aleksandr Zinoviev and the Polish philosopher Józef Tischner, however, have seen the homo sovieticus syndrome as resulting from spiritual rather than physical imprisonment. Predisposed by the planned Soviet economy, which did not motivate Soviet people to make any creative, intellectual, or moral efforts, homo sovieticus soon started to represent a certain official ritualistic behaviour that maintained the symbolic legitimacy of power.

What Happened to Andres Lapeteus? tells the story of an ambitious young Estonian official during Stalinist and post-Stalinist years, but does it in a novel way for its time, tackling the popular criticism of the cult of personality in the Thaw era from the viewpoint of individual responsibility. Offering a charismatic black-and-white version of the novel The Case of Andres Lapeteus (Andres Lapeteuse juhtum, 1963) by the Estonian writer Paul Kuusberg, Kromanov’s new wave film still makes us ponder the often avoided and delicate issue of the Sovietisation of the Baltic states from the inside.