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Growth Effects of Cross-border Mergers and Acquisitions in European Transition Countries

Abstract

This paper deals with the economic effect of cross-border mergers and acquisitions on GDP per capita in European transition countries for the 2000- 2014 period. Our analysis shows that cross-border mergers and acquisitions have a negative effect on GDP per capita in the current period, whereas their lagged level positively impacts output performance. We found that transition countries characterized by a higher quality of institutional setting have achieved a positive impact on GDP per capita.

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Convergence in GDP per capita across the EU regions— spatial effects

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to offer an empirical insight into the spatial effects of growth of regional income and disparities across EU regions (NUTS 2). Since regions are spatial units and there are interrelated standard linear regression is not sufficient to evidence the convergence process. Two models (Spatial Lag Model – SLM and Spatial Error model – SEM), derived from spatial econometrics, have been used to identify and explain spatial effects in convergence clubs—all EU countries (EU-28), countries that entered the EU in 2004 (EU-13) and countries that were in EU prior to 2004 (EU-15). Unconditional and conditional β-convergence has been examined in the period 2000-2015 thus covering two financial perspectives (including n + 2 rule3). Dummy variables have been also applied to catch the country-specific effects, such as national policies, legislation, technology progress, etc.

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Financial Stability of Insurance Companies in Selected CEE Countries

at: https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.KD.ZG?locations=HU (15 December 2018). 35. World Bank (N/Ab), “World Bank national accounts data and OECD National Accounts data files”, available at: https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.KD.ZG?locations=PL (15 December 2018). 36. World Bank (N/Ac), “World Bank national accounts data and OECD National Accounts data files”, available at: https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.KD.ZG?locations=HR (15 December 2018). 37. Yanase, N., Asai, Y., Lai, G. C. (2008

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The role of entrepreneurship in explaining the real Gross Domestic Product per capita: Regression model selection

and GDP per capita. In Bendekovic, M., Klacmer Calopa, M. and Filipovic, D. (Eds.) “Economic and Social Development”, Book of Proceedings of the 6th International Scientific Conference on Economic and Social Development and 3rd Eastern European ESD Conference: Business Continuity, Vienna, 25-25 April 2014.Varazdin, Croatia: Varazdin Development and Entrepreneurship Agency. ISBN: 978-953-6125-10-4. pp. 507-516. 16. Harris, R. (1995). Using Cointegration Analysis in Econometrics Modelling. Prentice Hall/Harvester Wheatsheaf, Upper Saddle River

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Testing the validity of the Linder hypothesis for Croatia

2018]. 29. World Bank (2018a). GDP per capita (Current US$). Available at https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD [01 May 2018]. 30. World Bank (2018b). World Integrated Trade Solution. Available at https://wits.worldbank.org/CountryProfile/en/Country/HRV/StartYear/2000/EndYear/2016/TradeFlow/Import/Partner/ALL/Indicator/MPRT-TRD-VL [01 May 2018].

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The Marginal Benefit of an Active Labor Market Program Relative to a Public Works Program: Evidence from Papua New Guinea

(NSO, 2013; Jones and McGavin, 2015 ). There are large skill shortages in a variety of trades, such as carpentry, hospitality, retail, and office administration ( Imbun, 2015 ). In addition, the cost of labor is quite high as the minimum wage was around 1.22 United States Dollars (USD) per hour in 2018, which is the same as countries with Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita four times that of PNG (such as Malaysia) ( Jones and McGavin, 2015 ). Despite the large skill shortages, there are few opportunities for youth to enter the formal sector labor market in

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Economics of Artificial Intelligence: Implications for the Future of Work

leading economies from a long-term perspective, a deceleration in productivity growth can be detected, despite a short-lived acceleration during the 1990s ( Fig. 2 ). This is also reflected in similar developments of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita (i.e., including the inactive population) that show a remarkable absence of accelerating improvements in living standards. This observation had already perplexed economists during the 1980s when Robert Solow famously stated that “you can see the computer age everywhere but in the productivity statistics” ( David, 1990

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Economic Crises and Emission of Pollutants: A Historical Review of Select Economies Amid Two Economic Recessions

Abstract

This paper investigates the historical trends in economic development through the impact of economic depressions and emissions of greenhouse gasses, namely carbon dioxide (CO2). The analysis includes four countries: the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and Japan. The focus, therefore, will be on the impact of two economic crises and their effect on global warming. Temperature changes in the longer period are very often regarded as a result of human activity, which can be measured by the increase of GDP (per capita). The findings indicate that GDP (per capita) parameters cannot be considered as correct measures of human pollution activity. The results show that the long-run temperature can be evaluated with the help of annual average temperatures of the previous four years. The proposed model does not only provide quite satisfactory forecasts, but is very stable with coefficients variables that can make a model more reliable for practice.

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Research Activities and their Relation to Economic Performance of Regions in the European Union

Abstract

Background: The intensity of innovation could often be crucial for further economic development of the regions. Science and technology are often seen as the key factor supporting innovation in the regions. Furthermore, we can assume that higher intensity of research activities could lead to better economic performance.

Objectives: Research aims to examine the link between the economic performance of the region and the intensity of science and technology activities, proxied by the share of employees in science and technology.

Methods/Approach: The analysis is based on panel data for NUTS2 regions of the European Union (EU) member states. We conducted correlation analysis, panel Granger causality tests and regression analysis.

Results: Our results suggest the existence of a significant positive correlation between GDP per capita and the share of employees in science and technology. Moreover, the regions with a higher intensity of science and technology activities are mostly characterized by relatively low unemployment rates.

Conclusions: Research activities are positive correlated with regional GDP and negatively correlated with unemployment. However, increasing the share of employment in science and technology beyond a certain turning point would not lead to any further positive effects on regional economic performance.

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Greenfield and Brownfield Investments and Economic Growth: Evidence from Central and Eastern European Union Countries

., & López-Bazo, E. (2005). Breaking the panels: An application to the GDP per capita. Econometrics Journal, 8 (2), 159–175. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1368-423X.2005.00158.x De Mello, L. R. (1999). Foreign direct investment-led growth: evidence from time series and panel data. Oxford Economic Papers, 51 (1), 133-151. https://doi.org/10.1093/oep/51.1.133 Dumitrescu, E. I., & Hurlin, C. (2012). Testing for Granger non-causality in heterogeneous panels. Economic Modelling, 29 (4), 1450-1460. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econmod.2012.02.014 Eberhardt, M

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