Search Results

1 - 10 of 12 items :

  • Central Europe x
  • Literature of other Nations and Languages x
  • Other Nations and Languages x
Clear All
Introduction: Shakespeare and/in Europe: Connecting Voices

Performance of The Merchant of Venice .” Sederi 27 (2017): 129-148. Olzak, Susan. The Dynamics of Ethnic Competition and Conflict . Stanford: Stanford University Press. 1992. Orkin, Martin. “Shifting Shakespeare.” Pmla 118.1 (2003): 134-136. Orlich, Ileana Alexandra. Dramatic and Literary Transcreations . New York: Central European University Press, 2016. Pfister, Manfred. “Europa/Europe: Myths and Muddles.” Myths of Europe . Eds. Richard Littlejohns and Soncini, Sara. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2007. Quillian, Lincoln. “Group Threat and

Open access
Werkwinkel
Journal of Low Countries and South African Studies; The Journal of Adam Mickiewicz University
Open access
Multicultural Shakespeare
Translation, Appropriation and Performance; The Journal of University of Lodz
Open access
Het beeld van Midden- en Oost-Europa in Nederlandse literaire non-fictie

Abstract

Over the last 20 years, literary nonfiction has become increasingly popular among the Dutch reading public. Thanks to increasing sales, translations and literary awards the genre achieved a strong position in Dutch literature. This article analyzes the image of Central and Eastern European countries in Dutch literary nonfiction of the last ten years (2004-14). It searches for characteristics of an orientalist and balkanist discourse and the presence of the imagological centre-periphery model in the works of Geert Mak, Jelle Brandt Corstius, Olaf Koens, Joop Verstraten and Jan Brokken. Contemporary Dutch literary nonfiction contains a euro-orientalist discourse. Characteristics such as underdevelopment, hedonism, obscurity and authenticity are projected on Central and Eastern Europe, which is put in the periphery of Western Europe.

Open access
The Genesis of the Idea ‘Dutch Written Literature’ in Bohemia

Abstract

Since mid-19th century Dutch and Flemish literature has often been translated into Central European languages. We find authors like Conscience, Multatuli or Heijermans almost everywhere, often with the same works. Until the late 19th century translations were often made via German. Czech had a special position. Though there is not that much translated into this language as into German, until World War II Czech was the language into which was translated more than into other Central European languages. Until the 20s many translators were writers themselves. This gives rise to questions such as how the choice was made, what is the position of a particular author or his work within translated literature? How was Dutch literature defined? In this paper, we give a look how the choice was made, at the position of translators of Dutch literature in the late 19th and early 20th century in the Czech literary field, the position of Dutch in their work and how this literature was received in translation.

Open access
From Central Asia to South Africa: In Search of Inspiration in Rock Art Studies

. 155-174. _____. 2001b. “The Petroglyphs of Central Asian from the Viewpoint of the Indo-Iranian Hypothesis.” Indo-European Studies Bulletin 9(2): 9-19. _____. 2001c. “Sun Gods or Shamans? Interpreting the ‘Solar-Headed’ Petroglyphs of Central Asia.” The Archaeology of Shamanism. Ed. N. Price. London and New York: Routledge. 65-86. _____. 2002a. “Crossing the Crack: Flying to the Cloud. Indo-Iranians, Shamanism and Central Asian Rock Art.” Bolletino del Centro Camuno di Studi Preistorici 33: 97

Open access
Whose Castle is it Anyway? : Local/Global Negotiations of a Shakespearean Location

Cultural Memory . Cambridge: CUP, 2015. Drábek, Pavel. “English Theatre and Central European Marionette Drama: A Study in Theater Etymology”. Transnational Mobility in Early Modern Theater . Ed. Robert Hencke and Eric Nicholson. London, New York: Routledge, 2014. 177-199. “Foreword”. Festspillene paa Kronborg . Theatre programme, 1949. 5. Gurr, The Shakespearean Stage 1574-1642 . Cambridge: CUP, 2011. Henningsen, Henning. “En museumsmands erindringskavalkade: Handels-og Søfartsmuseet gennem 30 år”. 1990. http://mfs.dk/wp-content/uploads/2016

Open access
“The Writer Is Essentially Indiscrete.” On the Literary Gossip of a Dutch Literary Celebrity

References Batty, Craig. 2014. “‘Me and You and Everyone We Know.’ The Centrality of Character in Understanding Media Texts.” Real Lives, Celebrity Stories. Narratives of Ordinary and Extraordinary People across Media. Eds. Thomas Bronwen and Julia Round. New York / London: Bloomsbury Publishing USA. 35-56. Bax, Sander. 2013. “The Nobel Prize and the European Dream. Harry Mulisch’s European Authorship from a National and an International Perspective.” Journal of Dutch Literature 4(2): 4-26. _____. 2015. De

Open access
Ulisse all’Isola di Circe (Brussels 1650): Operatic Transformation of Classical Tradition and Dissolution of Stoic Problems

: A Study in the Adaptability of a Traditional Hero. 2 revised ed. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Sullivan, Henry W. 1985. “Calderon and Semi-Operatic Stage in Spain after 1651.” Calderon and the Baroque Tradition. Eds Kurt Levy, Jesus Ara, and Gethin Hughes. Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press. 69-80. T’Hooft, Sigrid. 2008. “Italianita in Brussels around 1650: The Opera Ulisse nell’isola di Circe by Giuseppe Zamponi.” Italian Opera in Central Europe 1614-1780. II: Italianita: Image and Practice. Eds Corinna Herr, Herbert Seifert

Open access
The Historical Taboo: Colonial Discourses and Postcolonial Identities in Belgium

Postcolonial Europe: Africa and the Black Diaspora. Ed. Dominic Richard David Thomas. London: Routlegde. 54-64. Buxant, Martin, and Steven Samyn. 2011. Belgique, un roi sans pays. Paris: Plon. Böröcz, Jozsef, and Alejandro Portes. 1989. “Contemporary Immigration: Theoretical Perspectives on Its Determinants and Modes of Incorporation.” International Migration Review 23(3): 606-630. Calvet, Louis-Jean. 2010. Histoire du francais en Afrique. Une langue en copropriete? Paris: Ecriture. Castryck, Geert. 2006. “Whose

Open access