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Musicology Today
The Journal of University of Warsaw
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Research on 18th Century Music in Poland. An Introduction

Abstract

Research on 18th-century music has been one of the key areas of interest for musicologists ever since the beginnings of musicological studies in Poland. It initially developed along two distinct lines: general music history (with publications mostly in foreign languages) and local history (mostly in Polish). In the last three decades the dominant tendency among Polish researchers has been, however, to relate problems of 18th-century Polish musical culture to the political history of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and more generally – to the political history of Central Europe at large. The most important subjects taken up in research on 18th-century music include: the musical cultures of the royal court in 18th-century Warsaw (primarily in the works of Alina Żórawska-Witkowska) as well as Polish aristocratic residences (e.g. studies by Szymon Paczkowski and Irena Bieńkowska), the ecclesiastical and monastic circles (publications by Alina Mądry, Paweł Podejko, Remigiusz Pośpiech and Tomasz Jeż); problems of musical style (texts by Szymon Paczkowski); research on sources containing music by European composers (e.g. by Johann Adolf Hasse); the musical culture of cities (of Gdańsk, first and foremost); studies concerning the transfer of music and music-related materials, the musical centres and peripheries, etc.

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Oskar Kolberg (1814–1890) the Founder of Musical Ethnography in Poland

Abstract

The article presents the greatest Polish ethnographer, who was also a professionally educated musician. He concentrated his activities on the oral musical culture, still vital in the 19th century but liable to changes. Culture studies by Kolberg concerned mainly rural communities, statistically dominating in those times. He planned to edit 60 volumes geographically covering the first Polish State from before 1772; he managed to print 33 of them in his lifetime and prepare many further anthologies for editing. Up till now, the editorial work is still in progress. The already edited 80 volumes show us an old social culture, folk ceremonies, musical repertoire including ritual singing, songs and instrumental pieces. Kolberg’s printed monument is a source of reflection on the past and can inspire social studies, ethnomusicological research as well as musical ensembles performing traditional ethnic music of peasant origin. The size of Kolberg’s documentation means that a special Institute of Oskar Kolberg had to be established to continue editorial and research work.

In spite of his positivistic and empirical attitude, Kolberg still kept a romantic faith in the significance of folk songs and singing for the preservation of national components in cultural consciousness. Simultaneously, he developed a model for structural analysis of popular/folk culture and intended to build a cultural atlas of the country, building on the work of his father, professor of the University of Warsaw, an outstanding cartographer. But the core of Kolberg’s programme, its “planetary centre”, was always music. It was music that gave him the stimulus to interpret the culture of Central-Eastern Europe. To preserve regional diversity, he wrote down more than 20 thousand vocal melodies, song texts and instrumental pieces, paying special attention to variants and ornamentation. For the contemporary composer, Kolberg’s volumes are a useful musical reader. These huge anthologies of elementary but highly integrated musical concepts demonstrate the collective creativity and a fascinating prefiguration of mass culture, still open to symbols and to poetry. Kolberg’s music transcriptions, catching music in the process of performance, should not be treated as unchangeable patterns for copying, but rather as a source that helps understand creativity in traditional oral culture.

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Annales UMCS, Artes
The Journal of Maria Curie-Sklodowska University
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The Concept of Polish Music: In Search of Adequate Criteria

-Kominek, S. (2016). Stanisław Moniuszko as a National Prophet: Facts and Myths . In: S. Żerańska-Kominek (Ed.), Nationality vs Universality: Music Historiographies in Central and Eastern Europe (pp. 73–87). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

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From Restrictions to Freedom The Perilous Path to the First Warsaw Autumn Festival

SOURCES Archive of New Acts (AAN), KC PZPR 237/XVIII-120 [Central Committee, Polish United Workers’ Party]. AAN, KC PZPR 237/XVIII-143. AAN, MKiS 366-1 2768 [Ministry of Culture and Art]. Archive of Polish Composers, Warsaw University (AKP), Korespondencja Z. Lissy (1945-1955) [Z. Lissa Correspondence]. AKP, Palester Audycje RWE [Palester. Radio Free Europe Broadcast]. AKP, Zofia Lissa: Korespondencja polskojęzyczna [Zofia Lissa: Correspondence in Polish]. Audycje Polskiego Radia od 16.V do 22.V. 1955 Roku (1955) (Polish

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Musicalia
Journal of the Czech Museum of Music
Open access
The Technique of Optimal Use of Facial Muscles in Trumpet Interpretation

References 1. Alsteens, Stijn, Spira, Freyda, Ainsworth, Maryan W., Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), (2012) Dürer and beyond: Central European drawings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1400-1700 , New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art; New Haven 2. Baker, Theodore, Slonimsky, Nikolas, (1995) Dictionnaire biographique des musiciens , Edition Robert Laffont, Paris 3. Barclay, Robert, (1992) The Art of the Trumpet-Maker: The Materials, Tools, and Techniques of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries in Nuremberg , Oxford University

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