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Comparison between thrombophilic gene polymorphisms among high risk patients

References 1. LANE, D.A., P.M. MANNUCCI, K.A. BAUER, R.M. BERTINA, N.P. BOCHKOV, V. BOULYJNKOV, et al., Inherited thrombophilia: part 1. Thrombosis and haemostasis, 1996. 76 (05): p. 651-662. 2. BUCHHOLZ, T. and C.J. THALER, Inherited thrombophilia: impact on human reproduction. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 2003. 50 (1): p. 20-32. 3. CORIU, L., R. UNGUREANU, R. TALMACI, V. USCATESCU, M. CIRSTOIU, D. CORIU, et al., Hereditary Thrombophilia and thrombotic events in pregnancy: single-center experience. Journal of medicine

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The Romanian Society of Internal Medicine’s Choosing Wisely Campaign

REFERENCES 1. Choosing Wisely/Good Stewardship – National Physicians Alliance , Available at: http://npalliance.org/promoting-goodstewardship-in-medicine-project/ [accessed. 2018-10-07]. 2. GOOD STEWARDSHIP WORKING GROUP. The “top 5” lists in primary care: meeting the responsibility of professionalism. Arch. Intern. Med. 2011; 171 (15):1385–90. 3. Choosing Wisely , Available at: http://www.choosingwisely.org/ [accessed. 2018-05-20]. 4. Choosing Wisely Canada , Available at: https://choosingwiselycanada.org/ [accessed. 2018-05

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Cardiovascular risk factors in a Roma sample population from Romania

nd 2017. 4. C. BRÜGGEMANN, E. FRIEDMAN, E. FRIEDMAN, The Decade of Roma Inclusion: Origins, Actors, and Legacies , Eur. Educ. 2017; 4 9 (1):1-9. doi:10.1080/10564934.2017.1290422. 5. B. COOK, G.F. WAYNE, A. VALENTINE, A. LESSIOS, E. YEH, Revisiting the evidence on health and health care disparities among the Roma: A systematic review 2003-2012 , Int. J. Public Health. 2013; 58 (6):885–911. doi:10.1007/s00038-013-0518-6. 6. T. JANEVIC, J. JANKOVIC, E. BRADLEY, Socioeconomic position, gender, and inequalities in self-rated health between Roma

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Atrial fibrillation: A review of modifiable risk factors and preventive strategies

Electrophysiology. 2018; 29 (5):725-32. doi:doi:10.1111/jce.13458. 26. WINKLE RA, MEAD RH, ENGEL G, KONG MH, FLEMING W, SALCEDO J et al. Impact of obesity on atrial fibrillation ablation: Patient characteristics, long-term outcomes, and complications . Heart rhythm. 2017; 14 (6):819-27. doi:10.1016/j.hrthm.2017.02.023. 27. GALLAGHER C, HENDRIKS JML, ELLIOTT AD, WONG CX, RANGNEKAR G, MIDDELDORP ME et al. Alcohol and incident atrial fibrillation - A systematic review and meta-analysis . International journal of cardiology. 2017; 246 :46-52. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.05

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The Hong Kong Society of Rheumatology Biologics Registry: Updated Report (May 2017)

obstructive airway disease (COAD) (0.5%), chronic hepatitis C infection (0.4%), and demyelination (0.04%). Discontinuation of Treatment The usage of biological agents is updated in Table 2 . Twenty-seven percent of the treatment courses involved etanercept, which remained the commonest biological agent ever used. Etanercept was also the most frequent agent that was currently used by patients (27.5%). Table 2 Biological agents used No. of courses (%) (ever use) No. of patients (%) (current use: up to May 2017) Etanercept 1,048 (27

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The severity of coronary artery disease was not associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a series of 264 non-diabetic patients who underwent coronary angiography

REFERENCES 1. POCHA C, KOLLY P, DUFOUR JF. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-related hepatocellular carcinoma: A problem of growing magnitude . Semin Liver Dis. 2015; 35 (3):304-17. 2. FRIEDRICH-RUST M, SCHOELZEL F, MAIER S, SEEGER F, REY J, FICHTLSCHERER S, et al. Severity of coronary artery disease is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A single-blinded prospective mono-center study . PLoS One. 2017; 12 (10):e0186720. 3. PERERA N, INDRAKUMAR J, ABEYSINGHE WV, FERNANDO V, SAMARAWEERA WM, LAWRENCE JS. Non alcoholic fatty liver

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The Hong Kong Society of Rheumatology Biologics Registry: Updated Report (December 2016)

.7%), renal disease (2.5%), asthma (2.4%), hyperthyroidism (1.9%), ischemic heart disease (1.8%), cancer (1.5%), stroke (1.2%), congestive heart failure (0.8%), epilepsy (0.7%), heart attack (0.6%), previous extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (0.5%), COAD (0.5%), chronic hepatitis C infection (0.4%) and demyelination (0.04%). Discontinuation of Treatment The usage of biological agents is updated in Table 2 . Twenty-seven percent of the treatment courses involved etanercept, which was the commonest biological agent ever used. Etanercept was also the most frequent agent that

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Risk of malignancy in patients with rheumatic disorders

al. 2019 Risk of cancer among rheumatoid arthritis patients in California Cancer Causes Control 20 1001 1010 [2] Asking, J. et al. (2005). Ann Rheum Dis, 64, 1421-1426. 10.1136/ard.2004.033993 Asking J. et al. 2005 Ann Rheum Dis 64 1421 1426 [3] Smitten, A.L., Simon, T.A., Hochberg, M.C., et al. (2008). A meta-analysis of the incidence of malignancy in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Res Ther,10, R45 10.1186/ar2404 Smitten A.L. Simon T.A. Hochberg M.C. et al. 2008 A meta-analysis of the incidence of malignancy

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The Hong Kong Society of Rheumatology Biologics Registry: Updated Report (May 2018)

disease (2.4%), renal disease (2.3%), ischemic heart disease (2.3%), hyperthyroidism (1.9%), cancer (1.8%), stroke (1.1%), congestive heart failure (0.6%), heart attack (0.6%), epilepsy (0.6%), previous extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (0.5%), COAD (0.5%), chronic hepatitis C infection (0.3%) and demyelination (0.04%). 3 Discontinuation of Treatment The usage of biological agents is updated in Table 2 . Twenty-six percent of the treatment courses involved etanercept, which remained the commonest biological agent ever used. Etanercept was also the most frequent agent

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The Hong Kong Society of Rheumatology Biologics Registry: Updated Report (November 2017)

(3.8%), asthma (2.5%), liver disease (2.4%), renal disease (2.3%), ischemic heart disease (2.1%), hyperthyroidism (1.9%), cancer (1.7%), stroke (1.1%), congestive heart failure (0.6%), heart attack (0.6%), epilepsy (0.6%), previous extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (0.5%), COAD (0.5%), chronic hepatitis C infection (0.3%) and demyelination (0.04%). Discontinuation of Treatment The usage of biological agents is updated in Table 2 . Twenty-seven percent of the treatment courses involved etanercept, which remained the commonest biological agent ever used. Etanercept

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