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Dark and literary: A tour to the Isle of the Dead

References Banerjee, S. B., & Osuri, G. (2000). Silences of the media: Whiting out aboriginality in making news and making history. Media, Culture & Society , 22 (3), 263–284. https://doi.org/10.1177/016344300022003002 . Bayliss, J. F. (1973). Slave and convict narratives: A discussion of American and Australian writing. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , 8 (1–4), 142–149. https://doi.org/10.1177/00219894694.200817 . Beeton, S. (2004). Rural tourism in Australia – Has the gaze altered? Tracking rural images through film and tourism

Open access
The Importance of Intercultural Communicative Competences for Tourism Labour Market: Students’ Views and their Self-Assessment

Abstract

The present paper is founded on two pillars. Firstly, it is one of the current trends in education worldwide, i.e. to connect theory and practice. Secondly, it is the need to be interculturally competent speakers of a foreign language in today’s globalized world of massive migration flows and signs of increasing ethnocentrism. Based upon these two requirements, the ability to communicate in a FL effectively and interculturally appropriately in the tourism industry is a must, since being employed in whichever of its sectors means encountering other cultures on a daily basis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to find out undergraduate tourism students’ opinion on the importance of intercultural communicative competences for their future profession as well as their self-assessment in the given field. The findings of the research, which are to be compared to employers’ needs, revealed that there is considerable difference between the respondents’ views on the significance of the investigated issues and their self-esteem.

Open access
Using authentic materials for students of tourism in Slovenia: English language acquisition for students of the Faculty of Tourism of the University of Maribor

Abstract

The article examines the process of teaching English for specific purposes at the Faculty of Tourism of the University of Maribor, Slovenia using coursebooks and authentic supplementary materials. The survey has shown that the students of the Faculty of Tourism prefer supplementary authentic materials to coursebooks because they find them sufficiently interesting or challenging. Specially designed classroom materials that are put into the Moodle by the teacher also offer opportunities for various activities in lesson planning for teaching, listening, speaking, reading and writing. Another important aspect of supplementary materials is that they facilitate the teacher’s creativity. However, there are advantages and disadvantages to using only coursebooks or only specially prepared classroom materials, and both - coursebooks and supplementary materials - should be used only after careful consideration. Although authentic materials may contain complex grammatical structures and difficult vocabulary, they bring real-life situations into classrooms, and students therefore find them very motivating, the survey has shown.

Open access
in ExELL
Teaching English pronunciation by non-native teachers as seen by Slovak teachers

Abstract

The English language has become the so called “world wide language” due to the fact that it is used globally in many spheres of everyday life - education, business, labour market, technology, tourism, travel and others. In Slovakia, the educational system supports schools in the acquisition of the language by granting more English classes per week, by financing textbook materials, by bridging teaching practice with research as well as making English a mandatory subject of school leaving exams.

One of the crucial components in the English language education of Slovak learners appears to be the pronunciation. This language feature has its specificities and therefore it must be approached carefully. Although many researchers in Slovakia have focused on various aspects of English pronunciation, this article aims at the English teachers and their perception of this important issue. The survey focuses on Slovak teachers’ opinions about teaching English pronunciation to non-native learners, more specifically, about teaching techniques, error corrections, textbook materials and university teacher training.

Open access
(Net)Working CLIL in Portugal

Works Cited Almeida, Maria Altina. Content and Language Integrated Learning in Tourism Vocational Training in Portugal . (Unpublished Masters Dissertation). Escola Superior de Hotelaria e Turismo do Estoril, 2017, comum.rcaap.pt/handle/10400.26/19731. Accessed 10 Oct. 2018. Almeida, Marta Mateus de, et al. Evaluation Study on the Effectiveness of the Implementation of the Early Bilingual Education Project – Final Report, 2014, www.dge.mec.pt/sites/default/files/ProjetosCurriculares/Linguas/Ensino_Bilingue/documentos/final_report_december_2014_en

Open access
in e-TEALS
Cultural responsiveness in EFL teaching: reflections from native instructors

Training of Teacher Educators. Action in Teacher Education, 31(3), 19-27. http://doi.org/10.1080/01626620.2009.10463525 SANTORO, N., & MAJOR, J. (2012). Learning to be a culturally responsive teacher through international study trips: transformation or tourism? Teaching Education, 23(3), 309-322. http://doi.org/10.1080/10476210.2012.685068 SAYADIAN, S., & LASHKARIAN, A. (2010). Investigating Attitude and Motivation of Iranian University Learners Toward English as a Foreign Language. Contemporary Issues in Education Research, 3(1), 137

Open access