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Making a Mark—Time Changing Politics from Estonia: An Alternative Idea for the British, Bulgarian and Estonian EU Presidency

://dx.doi.org/2000/03;9;1;43-56 Lee, H. & Whitley, E. A. (2002), “Time and information technology: temporal impacts on individuals, organizations, and society,” The Information Society, vol. 18, pp. 235-240. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01972240290075084 Muñoz, R. C. & Schmitz, R. (2007), ‘Morning peak of air pollutant concentrations in urban areas: Effect of time lag between emissions and turbulence,’ 7th AMS Symposium on the Urban Environment, 10-13 September 2007, San Diego, California, USA. Palmer, A. W. (2002), ‘Negotiation and

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Newcomer, Normal Player or Regional Leader? Perceptions of Poland in the EU

–1266. Blazyca, G. – Kolkiewicz, M. (1999): Poland and the EU: Internal Disputes, Domestic Politics and Accession. Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics 15 (4): 131–143. Boeri, T. – Brücker, H. (2000): The Impact of Eastern Enlargement on Employment and Labour Markets in the EU Member States, Berlin and Milano, European Integration Consortium. Boulding, K. E. (1959): National Images and International Systems. Journal of Conflict Resolution 3 (2): 120–131. Böhmelt, T. – Freyburg, T. (2013): The Temporal Dimension of the Credibility of EU

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Technology Roadmaps, Innovation Journeys, and Nanoworld: A Spatio-temporal Consolidation of the EC Nanotechnology Policy

Abstract

Technology roadmaps have become an essential part of the European Commission’s (EC) nanotechnology policy strategies. They represent socio-technical landscapes and evolving pathways, suggesting the underlying or otherwise supportive metaphorical patterns and narrative structures. For the same reason, however, roadmaps are problematic assemblages: they can simplify and distort reality, and filter things that don’t fit. The presented study combines cognitive linguistics with narratology to scrutinise the European Commission’s nanotechnology roadmapping as a discursive formation. It targets the systematic metaphors in approximately two-hundred news and reports on nanotechnology, compiled ad hoc from the CORDIS database (between the years 1999–2015). It is argued that the identified metaphors correspond to a discourse topology of ‘locations’, ‘events’, and their structures, especially as regards to the dilemma of ‘path dependence’, overcoming ‘knowledge gaps’, and reaching ‘nanoworld’. These are accompanied by a narrative climax of developing mature science policy model, in the arrangement of actions and roles for the European governments, science (nanotechnology), policy, and the public. The study demonstrates how systematic metaphors engage all the actors in the narrative of ‘innovation journey’ to form stabilised structures of meaning, that is, spatio-temporal consolidation of nanotechnology policy. It is imperative to continuously assess the context of such consolidation, being less overt but not necessarily less effective, in privileging some meanings, interests, and practices over the others, thereby excluding other political alternatives.

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Regional Disparities on The New Silk Road: Some Thoughts about Regional Convergence

Greece, Regional Studies (2005), 39(9), pp. 1231–1244. Li Y., Wei Y.H.D., The spatial-temporal hierarchy of regional inequality of China, Applied Geography (2010), 30(3), pp. 303–316. Lux G., The institutional conditions of reindustrialization in postcrisis Central Europe, Journal of Economics and Management (2015), 19(1), pp. 16–33. Nijkamp P., Regional development as self-organized converging growth [in:] Spatial Disparities and Development Policy, Washington 2009, pp. 265–282. Overholt W.H., One Belt, One Road, One Pivot, Global Asia (2015

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Emptying Śūnyatā: a Critical Reading of Nishitani’s Religion and Nothingness

. The Kyoto School’s Takeover of Hegel: Nishida, Nishitani and Tanabe Remake the Philosophy of Spirit. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc. Tremblay, J., 2008. Hidden Aspects of Temporality from Nishida to Watsuji. In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 2: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations, (pp. 160-176). Ed. Victor Sōgen Hori and Melissa Anne-Marie Curley. Nanzan Instutitute for Religion and Culture. Vattimo, G., Rovatti, P. A., 2012.Weak Thought. Translated and with an introduction by Peter Carravetta. SUNY Press

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Rereading Diaspora: Reverberating Voices and Diasporic Listening in Italo-Australian Digital Storytelling

attuned to the ‘pangs’ that ‘sneak in through the back door’, we get a better sense of diasporic life, while simultaneously disrupting the assimilationist imperative of normative discourses of Australian multiculturalism. Shapiro (2000) summarises as follows: Creating unity out of constitutive division, the state attempts to write itself in a way that ends the split. Indeed, once we locate the state in a theatrical frame, imaginatively performing its distinctiveness rather than simply existing passively within a naturalized, geopolitical space, the split temporal

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Being “Other” in Berlin: German Koreans, Multiraciality, and Diaspora

not something that we are but something that we do. It offers a more critical approach to diaspora that eschews it as a given or taken-for-granted descriptive category that also assumes connectedness or affinities based solely on ethnicity or race (Brubaker 2005; Alexander 2017 ). Instead, the focus on diasporic resources allows for diaspora to be treated as a set of practices that form a complex, strategic and deliberate “stance” ( Alexander 2017 ). Diasporic resources suggest an active process of identity-making and, as such, are always fluid, temporal, partial

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Contemporary Citizenship: Four Types

radical students, strident feminists, foreigners, welfare scroungers, the unemployed and so on. But these resentments have little to do with traditional forms of class protest in any direct fashion, and they are generalised as an aspect of modern consumerism. Obviously, the business cycle may contribute to the temporal flow of resentment, but it is not central to the issue that modern consumption promotes the display of status distinction not based on merit or virtue, but largely on luck. The connection between citizenship and virtue is broken by the vagaries of the

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From the Concept to the Practice of Parliamentary Immunity

Abstract

Scholars have long debated the normative rationality, the temporal and legal aspects, and finally the limits and modern practices of parliamentary immunity. Therefore, this study does not insist on these classical interpretations anymore, but seeks to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the conceptual history of parliamentary immunity. Embracing two schools of thought, the Koselleckian interpretation and the Skinnerian variant, this paper aims to establish and clarify in detail the story of the concept of parliamentary immunity in order to elucidate, in a Socratic fashion, what we really mean when we say that a senator or a deputy benefits from legislative immunity. This inquiry will help us emphasise how this concept leaves behind its abstract notion and becomes an institution with strict rules and practices. In addition, considering the importance of this concept in the modern legislative and rhetoric histories and the frequency with which it is used, this study will question the meanings of parliamentary immunity in the light of different historical settings and will eventually trace out a single, coherent, and unified conceptual matrix. My contention is that once parliamentary immunity – seen as a conceptual construct only adjusting the balance of power between the executive and the legislative powers – becomes an institution with strong practices, it enforces the parliament as a unified and independent body and creates the prerequisite conditions for the democratic development.

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A shape-shifting creature dissected: political representations of Jean Monnet in European studies

. Niemann, A., 2006. Explaining Decisions in the European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Peterrson, B., Hellström, A., 2003. Return of the Kings: Temporality in the Construction of EU Identity. European Societies, 5(3), pp. 235-252. Pūras, A., 2014. Robert Owen in the History of the Social Sciences: Three Presentist Views. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 50(1), pp. 58-78. Samelson, F., 1974. History, Origin Myth and Ideology: ‘Discovery’ of social psychology. Journal of the Theory of Social

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