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Network Effects on Rhythms of Scientific Publications

-5205. Perc, M. (2014). The Matthew effect in empirical data. Journal of the Royal Society Interface , 11(98), 20140378. Pescosolido, B. A., Perry, B. L., & Borgatti, S. P. (Eds.). (2018). Sociocentric and Egocentric Approaches to Networks. In Egocentric Network Analysis: Foundations, Methods, and Models (pp. 20–34). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pinxten, R. (1995). Comparing Time and Temporality in Cultures. Cultural Dynamics , 7(2), 233–252. Rosa, H., & Scheuerman, W. E. (2009). Introduction. In H. Rosa & W. E. Scheuerman (Eds

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No Measure without Concept. A Critical Review on the Conceptualization and Measurement of Environmental Concern

Abstract:

Environmental concern is a highly relevant concept in the context of environmental change and increasing demand for political regulation of environmental protection. In order to prevent climate change, loss in global biodiversity or other highly critical environmental issues, we need to understand why (and why not) citizens support environmental politics. However, there is no measure without a concept, and empirical results might be biased if they are not operationalized according to well defined (theoretical and methodological) criteria. This research endeavor focuses on historical and more recent developments of the concept of individual environmental concern. It will be demonstrated that environmental concern is not only a distinct concept excluding behavior and knowledge, but is also rather complex addressing geographical as well as temporal issues. Most recent developments suggesting a hierarchical multi-dimensional character will be discussed and examples of the most relevant empirical measures and scales will be evaluated.

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‘I am not Spending on my Appearance’! Examining Self-Evaluated Low-Level Consumers of Clothing and Beauty Care in Finland, 1999–2009

Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to analyse consumers whose identity is not based on appearance-related consumption, but who want distance themselves from consumers willing to spend on physical appearance. The article examines importance of gender, age and place of residence in explaining self-evaluated low-level consumption of beauty care and clothing, and how the proportions of these consumers have changed between socio-demographic groups. The data consists of three cross-sectional consumption and lifestyle surveys collected in 1999 (N = 2 417), 2004 (N = 3 574) and 2009 (N = 1 202). The results suggest that a significant part of Finnish consumers do not consider beauty care or clothing consumption to be a part of their identity. The results indicate some temporal changes in Finnish consumers’ beauty care consumption evaluations. It seems that gender differences have been relatively stable, whereas disparities between consumers of different ages as well as urban and rural consumers have diminished.

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Phantasmic Devices: Wedding Videos and the Creation of an Imagined Transnational Community by Bulgarian Muslims in Spain

Abstract

For the Bulgarian Muslims in Spain wedding videos are a popular device for socializing, overcoming nostalgia and keeping pace with the news and events that take place back home in Bulgaria. The mediatization of the ritual allows an extension of the ritual across time and space. Watching the videos is a re-enactment of the celebration and has become part of the ritual itself. Subsequently, this extension of the ritual through a mediated device has led to its subtle transformations. At the same time, wedding videos and the particular mode of use produce a social effect beyond the structure of the ritual. They contribute to the extending and re-creating of a migrant community that spreads over space transnationally and temporally between the past of home and the present of life in migrancy. Drawing on ethnographic material and using the analytical tools of actor-network theory, the main aim of this paper is to trace the uses and effects of wedding videos for transforming the wedding ritual through postponing and re-enacting it on one hand, and for sustaining the phantasm of an imagined virtual community on the other. The broader problem that this paper seeks to address is the specific role that material devices play for producing social effects for migrant communities.

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The Unbearable Likeness of Being a Tourist: Expats, Travel and Imaginaries in the Neo-colonial Orient

Abstract:

This paper considers the impact of shared imaginaries of mobility among so-called elite, mobile professionals — early-career expatriates living in Nepal for a period of one to three years. Based on 18 months of fieldwork among expatriates in Kathmandu, I explore the ways in which these actors construct, navigate and narrativise the boundaries between themselves and the many tourists who visit Nepal each year. While in some transnational contexts, these guests may seek to align themselves with other guests such as tourists and foreign residents as a means of asserting and expressing shared commonalities of transnationality and mobility, expatriates in Kathmandu are keen to highlight perceived distance between themselves and other guests as much as they are the perceived proximities between themselves and native Nepalis. In focusing on this former interaction, I show that tourist imaginaries become important means for expatriates to negotiate difference as they learn their new local identities in a context of spatial and temporal transience. Though the academic literatures of migration and tourism have developed more or less in isolation from one another, these two spheres of mobility are in fact very much interrelated. I suggest that anthropological research into the self-conceptions of mobile professionals take into consideration other non-local groups with whom they share local spaces, since these actors can be used instrumentally as a means of strengthening both group and individual identities. If anthropology engages effectively with the interactions between hosts and guests in colonial spaces, I argue that just as much can be gleaned by looking at engagements between guests and other guests. Through a consideration of these border zones of encounter, anthropologists can illustrate ethnographically how individual expatriate identities are negotiated within communities of elite, mobile professionals.

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’Did You Arrive by Train or by Ship?:’ Transportation as Politics and Metaphor in Fieldwork in Socialist Romania

Macmillan. Harms, Erik. (2013). Eviction Time in the New Saigon: Temporalities of Displacement in the Rubble of Development. Cultural Anthropology 28(2): 344-68. Kideckel, David A. (1979). Agricultural Cooperativism and Social Process in a Romanian Commune. Dissertation, Anthropology Department. Amherst: University of Massachusetts. Kideckel, David A. (1993). The Solitude of Collectivism: Romanian Villagers to the Revolution and Beyond . New York: Cornell University Press. Kideckel, David A. (2007). Metaphors of America: Labor, Global

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Personal and Spiritual Development in Contemporary Romania: In Search of Ambivalence

2 This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-2515. REFERENCES Binkley, S. (2009). The Work of Neoliberal Governmentality: Temporality and Ethical Substance in the Tale of Two Dads. Foucault Studies (6):60. Binkley, S. (2011). Happiness, positive psychology and the program of neoliberal governmentality. Subjectivity 4:371–394. Bondi, L. (2005). Working the spaces of neoliberal subjectivity: Psychotherapeutic

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Analyzing Behavior Within Networks After Fragmentation. The Coagulant Agent Approach

(2002) ‘Destabilizing Networks’. Connections , 24(3): 79-92. Carley, K. M., J. Reminga and N. Kamneva (2003) ‘Destabilizing Terrorist Networks’, http://repository.cmu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1031&context=isr . Retrived: August 26, 2013. Cooke, R.J.E. (2006) Link Prediction and Link Detection in Sequences of Large Social Networks Using Temporal and Local. Department of Computer Science: University of Cape Town. Everton, S. (2013) Disrupting Dark Networks . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gourley, S., J. C. Bohorquez, A. Dixon

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Mosaics of Inclusion: Reflections on Thames Chase Community Forest

References Abram, D. (1996) The Spell of the Sensuous . New York: Vintage Books. Adams, M. (2005) Against Extinction: The Story of Conservation. London: Earthscan. Bateson, M.C. (1994) Peripheral Vision: Learning Along the Way . New York: Harper Collins. Buchanan, D.R. (2000) An Ethic for Health Promotion: Rethinking the Sources of Human Well-being . Oxford: Oxford University Press. Cerwonka, A. and Malkki, L. (2007) Improvising Theory: Process and Temporality in Ethnographic Fieldwork . Chicago: University of Chicago Press

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Sleep, Work and Globalization: The Evening/Night Shift Employees in Call Centre in Romania

, Employment and Society, 26(3): 464–480. Poster, W.R. (2007) ‘Saying ‘good morning’ in the night: the reversal of work time in global ICT service work’. Workplace Temporalities, 17: 55–112. Schor, J.B. (1992) The Overworked American. The Unexpected Decline of Leisure. New York: Basic Books. Silver, H. and F. Goldscheider (1994) ‘Flexible Work and Housework: Work and Family Constraints on Women’s Domestic Labour’. Social Forces, 72(4): 1103–1119. Steger, B. (2003) ‘Getting Away with Sleep: Social and Cultural Aspects of Dozing in Parliament

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