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Merging diaries and GPS records: The method of data collection for spatio-temporal research

Information Systems, 5(3): 287–301. MILLER, H. J. (2005): Necessary space – time conditions for human interaction. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 32(3): 381–401. MILLER, H. J., BRIDWELL, S. (2009): A field-based theory for time geography. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 99(1): 149–175. MILLER, H. J., WU, Y.-H. (2000): GIS software for measuring space-time accessibility in transportation planning and analysis. GeoInformatica, 4(2): 141–159. MOUNTAIN, D., RAPER, J. (2001): Modelling human spatio-temporal behaviour

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Moravian Geographical Reports
The Journal of Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS)
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Viticulture in The Czech Republic: Some Spatio-Temporal Trends

Abstract

From a global perspective, the growing of grapevines in the Czech Republic is of peripheral importance. For a group of grape-growing villages in southern Moravia, however, the making of wine is bound up with local history, traditions and cultural life, and contributes significantly to the local economy. This paper describes the current status of viticulture in Bohemia and Moravia, addressing changes in the number and structure of wine producers and pointing out some qualitative changes that the business is undergoing. Changing consumer tastes have brought a demand for quality wines of local origin, which cannot be met without high quality care of vineyards throughout the lifetime of the vines. Special attention is given to two alternative ways of tending vineyards - the development of integrated production, and organic viticulture - that are developing rapidly in the Czech Republic even when compared to Austria and Germany

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Rhythm of urban retail landscapes: Shopping hours and the urban chronotopes

. (2002): Industrial culture in a post-industrial world: The case of the North East of England. City, 6(3): 279–289. CASTELLS, M. (1977): The Urban Question: A Marxist Approach. London, Edward Arnold Publishers. CRANG, M. (2001): Rhythms of the city: Temporalised space and motion. In: May, J., Thrift, N. [eds.]: TimeSpace: Geographies of Temporality (pp. 187–207). London, Routledge. CRANG, M. (2005): Time: Space. In: Cloke, P., Johnston R. [eds.]: Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography’s Binaries (pp. 199–220). London, Sage

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Anytime? Anywhere? The seasonality of flight offers in Central Europe

geography of air transport volumes: An empirical analysis. Journal of Transport Geography, 19(6): 1387–1398. DOBRUSZKES, F., MONDOU, V., GHEDIRA, A. (2016): Assessing the impacts of aviation liberalisation on tourism: Some methodological considerations derived from the Moroccan and Tunisian cases. Journal of Transport Geography, 50(1): 115–127. FRANCIS, G., HUMPREYS, I., ISON, S., AICKEN, M. (2006): Where next for low cost airlines? A spatial and temporal comparative study. Journal of Transport Geography, 14(2): 83–94. GÁBOR, D. (2009): Low-cost Airlines

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The Spatial Distribution of Photovoltaic Power Plants in Relation to Solar Resource Potential: The Case of the Czech Republic and Slovakia

Abstract

Over the last few years, many European countries experienced a rapid growth of photovoltaic (PV) power plants. For example, more than 20, 000 new PV power plants were built in the Czech Republic. The high spatial and temporal variability of the solar resource and subsequent PV power plant production, poses new challenges for the reliability and predictability of the power grid system. In this paper, we analyse the most recent data on PV power plants built in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, with a focus on the spatial distribution of these installations. We have found that these power plants scarcely follow the solar resource potential and, apparently, other factors affect decisions for their location. Recent changes in the support schemes for solar applications also influence these patterns, with new installations mostly confined to built-up areas. These changes will require new tools to assess the appropriate locations of PV systems.

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Some dilemmas of post-industrialism in a region of traditional industry: The case of the Katowice conurbation, Poland

Abstract

The problem of using the concept of post-industrialism to define regions with traditional industries is addressed in this article. It focuses on the diversity of industrial development in the Katowice conurbation (Poland) and the difficulties of situating the region in the widely-used taxonomy by Phelps and Ozawa, which assumes a one-way transition from the late-industrial to post-industrial stage. The authors point to the fact that only some of the towns can be described as post-industrial, since there are also towns in which traditional industries continue to develop relatively well and others at an advanced stage of re-industrialisation. The proposal is made that the Katowice conurbation can be described as a “trans-industrial region” in order to account for the various stages of development in the industrial sector in the towns of the conurbation, and to underline the dynamic nature and temporal variability of the industrialisation factor in the region.

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Human Geography and the hinterland: The case of Torsten Hägerstrand’s ‘belated’ recognition

Abstract

Seeing Human Geography as a nexus of temporally oscillating concepts, this paper investigates the dissemination of scientific ideas with a focus on extra-scientific factors. While scientific progress is usually evaluated in terms of intellectual achievement of the individual researcher, geographers tend to forget about the external factors that tacitly yet critically contribute to knowledge production. While these externalities are well-documented in the natural sciences, social sciences have not yet seen comparable scrutiny. Using Torsten Hägerstrand’s rise to prominence as a concrete example, we explore this perspective in a social-science case – Human Geography. Applying an STS (Science and Technology Studies) approach, we depart from a model of science as socially-materially contingent, with special focus on three extra-scientific factors: community norms, materiality and the political climate. These factors are all important in order for knowledge to be disseminated into the hinterland of Human Geography. We conclude it is these types of conditions that in practice escape the relativism of representation.

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Scales of Disconnection: Mismatches Shaping the Geographies of Emerging Energy Landscapes

Abstract

The networked nature of energy systems produces geographies of connection, but the focus of this paper is on geographies of disconnection, exploring the multi-scalar processes which shape the context in which energy landscapes emerge. It does so, first, by presenting a case study of farmers' attitudes to perennial energy crops in south-west Scotland. Their strong antipathy to converting farmland to short-rotation coppice, and the reasons for their negative attitudes, exemplify some of the wider mismatches and disconnects which the paper goes on to discuss. These include socio-political and socio-cultural mismatches, and a range of essentially geographical disconnects which are scalar in nature, such as the familiar local-global tension and the mismatch between the scales (both temporal and spatial) at which environmental and human systems organise and function. The discussion shows how these disjunctions not only affect energy geographies but also raise far-reaching questions about the ability of current governance structures and liberal democratic systems to respond swiftly and effectively to global challenges. The way that these mismatches are negotiated will mould both the character of future energy landscapes and the speed at which they take shape.

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Land-Use Changes and Their Relationships to Selected Landscape Parameters in Three Cadastral Areas in Moravia (Czech Republic)

Slovak Republic 1970s-1990s. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, Vol. 2, No. 2., p. 129-139. FU, B. J., ZHANG, Q. J, CHEN, L. D., ZHAO, W. W., GULINCK, H., LIU, G. B., YANG, Q. Y., ZHU, Y. G. (2006): Temporal change in land use and its relationship to slope degrees and soil type in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau of China. Catena, Vol. 65, No. 1, p. 41-48. HERSPERGER, A. M., GENNAIO, M. P., VERBURG, P. H., BÜRGI, M. (2010): Linking land change with driving forces and actors: four conceptual

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