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Interpreting Games: Meaning Creation in the Context of Temporality and Interactivity

Abstract

The concept of interpretation applied to texts, videos, pictures, posts and all other types of media is varied. Objects are open to different forms of interpretation and games, as objects of meaning, are no exception. Explicating meaning creation in games will create a better understanding of game functions and their effects. This study explores how games alter the process of meaning creation through investigating their detailed properties and differentiation from other forms of media as objects of interpretation. This study argues that understanding meaning creation in games entails more than an examination of the presentation layer by a deeper analysis that considers interactivity and temporality. It contends that due to the interactive nature of games, the role of player participation is vital because gamers influence the operative mechanics of games and hence their meanings.

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Merging diaries and GPS records: The method of data collection for spatio-temporal research

Information Systems, 5(3): 287–301. MILLER, H. J. (2005): Necessary space – time conditions for human interaction. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 32(3): 381–401. MILLER, H. J., BRIDWELL, S. (2009): A field-based theory for time geography. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 99(1): 149–175. MILLER, H. J., WU, Y.-H. (2000): GIS software for measuring space-time accessibility in transportation planning and analysis. GeoInformatica, 4(2): 141–159. MOUNTAIN, D., RAPER, J. (2001): Modelling human spatio-temporal behaviour

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Technology Roadmaps, Innovation Journeys, and Nanoworld: A Spatio-temporal Consolidation of the EC Nanotechnology Policy

Abstract

Technology roadmaps have become an essential part of the European Commission’s (EC) nanotechnology policy strategies. They represent socio-technical landscapes and evolving pathways, suggesting the underlying or otherwise supportive metaphorical patterns and narrative structures. For the same reason, however, roadmaps are problematic assemblages: they can simplify and distort reality, and filter things that don’t fit. The presented study combines cognitive linguistics with narratology to scrutinise the European Commission’s nanotechnology roadmapping as a discursive formation. It targets the systematic metaphors in approximately two-hundred news and reports on nanotechnology, compiled ad hoc from the CORDIS database (between the years 1999–2015). It is argued that the identified metaphors correspond to a discourse topology of ‘locations’, ‘events’, and their structures, especially as regards to the dilemma of ‘path dependence’, overcoming ‘knowledge gaps’, and reaching ‘nanoworld’. These are accompanied by a narrative climax of developing mature science policy model, in the arrangement of actions and roles for the European governments, science (nanotechnology), policy, and the public. The study demonstrates how systematic metaphors engage all the actors in the narrative of ‘innovation journey’ to form stabilised structures of meaning, that is, spatio-temporal consolidation of nanotechnology policy. It is imperative to continuously assess the context of such consolidation, being less overt but not necessarily less effective, in privileging some meanings, interests, and practices over the others, thereby excluding other political alternatives.

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Understanding the Structural Complexity of Induced Travel Demand in Decision-Making: A System Dynamics Approach

Abstract

Background and purpose: Induced travel demand (ITD) is a phenomenon where road construction increases vehicles’ kilometers traveled. It has been approached with econometric models that use elasticities as measure to estimate how much travel demand can be induced by new roads. However, there is a lack of “white-box” models with causal hypotheses that explain the structural complexity underlying this phenomenon. We propose a system dynamics model based on a feedback mechanism to explain structurally ITD.

Methodology: A system dynamics methodology was selected to model and simulate ITD. First, a causal loop diagram is proposed to describe the ITD structure in terms of feedback loops. Then a stock-flows diagram is formulated to allow computer simulation. Finally, simulations are run to show the quantitative temporal evolution of the model built.

Results: The simulation results show how new roads in the short term induce more kilometers traveled by vehicles already in use; meanwhile, in the medium-term, new traffic is generated. These new car drivers appear when better flow conditions coming from new roads increase attractiveness of car use. More cars added to vehicles already in use produce new traffic congestion, and high travel speeds provided by roads built are absorbed by ITD effects.

Conclusion: We concluded that approaching ITD with a systemic perspective allows for identifying leverage points that contribute to design comprehensive policies aimed to cope with ITD. In this sense, the model supports decision- making processes in urban contexts wherein it is still necessary for road construction to guarantee connectivity, such as the case of developing countries.

Open access
Sense of purpose in life vs. creative activity motivators in senior managers

Wratislaviensis. Prace Psychologiczne, 55, 65-74. 9. Nosal, Cz. S. (2006), Time and Age: Mental Representations of Time and Temporal Orientation of People at Different Periods of Life. W: Z. Uchnast (ed.). Psychology of Time. Theoretical and Empirical Approaches, Lublin: Wydawnictwo KUL, 97-104 10. Popielski, K. (1987), Testy egzystencjalne: metody badania frustracji egzystencjalnej i nerwicy noogennej. W: K. Popielski (red.). Człowiek - pytanie otwarte. Studia z logoteorii i logoterapii. Lublin: Redakcja Wydawnictw KUL, s. 237

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Business model of the enterprise as a tool of building interorganizational relationships

, “Journal of Marketing Research”, vol. 27. 11. Jarratt D. (2008), Testing a theoretically constructed relationship management capability, “European Journal of Marketing”, vol. 42, no. 9/10. 12. Kalwani M., Narayandas N. (1995), Long-term manufacturer-supplier relationships: Do they pay off for supplier fi rms? “Journal of Marketing”, vol. 59, no. 1. 13. Khoja F., Adams J., Kauffman R. (2010), A Temporal Model of Vertical Relationships, “Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing”, vol. 17, no 3. 14. Landeros R

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Team Learning Processes and Activities in Organization: A Case Study

Role of Structures, Processes and Boundaries in a Longitudinal Case Analysis. Journal of Change Management , 5(3), 311-328. Guchait, P. & Hamilton, K. (2013). The temporal priority of team learning behaviors vs. shared mental models, in service management teams. International Journal of Hospitality Management , 33, 19-28. Harvey, S., Peterson, R. S. & Anand N. (2014). The Process of Team Boundary Spanning in Multi-Organizational Contexts. Small Group Research , 45(5), 506-538. Hedlund, E. & Österberg, J. (2013). Team Training, Team Learning

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Moravian Geographical Reports
The Journal of Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS)
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Creativity and effectiveness in organizations. A new approach to an old question

psychology of organizations , Wiley, New York. 14. Kaufman J.C., & Beghetto R.A. (2009), Beyond big and little: The four C model of creativity , “Review of General Psychology”, 13: 1-12. 15. Kazanjian R.K., & Drazin R. (2012), Organizational learning, knowledge management and creativity , in M.D. Mumford (Ed.) Handbook of Organizational Creativity , 547-568. Academic Press/Elsevier, London/Waltham/San Diego. 16. Kozlowski S.W.J., & Klein K.J. (2000), A multilevel approach to theory and research in organizations: Contextual, temporal, and emergent

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Organizational Ambidexterity, Exploration, Exploitation and Firms Innovation Performance

.1080/19416521003691287 Lubatkin, M. H., Simsek, Z., Ling, Y., & Veiga, J. F. (2006). Ambidexterity and performance in smallto medium-sized firms: The pivotal role of top management team behavioral integration. Journal of Management, 32(5), 646-672, http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0149206306290712 March, J. G. (1991). Exploration and exploitation in organizational learning. Organization Science, 2(1), 71-87, http://www.jstor.org/stable/2634940 Nerkar, A. (2003). Old is gold? The value of temporal exploration in the creation of new knowledge. Management Science, 49

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