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Vom Schwarz-Weiß-Kontrast zur dividuellen Kompositkultur

Abstract

I discuss current shifts in cultural understandings under postcolonial conditions with particular regard to the French-African-Antillean area. Through a short reconstruction of culture constitutive approaches, their continuation and criticism in the Antillean area and furthermore the Afropolitan interpretations by Mbembe,Enwezor and African artists, I come to the conclusion that we need an epistemological shift in the cultural studies discourse itself. Along the lines of the affirmative- critical aesthetic of the mentioned African theorists, curators and artists, I advocate that the cultural studies discourse distances itself from descriptions in terms of cultural contrast, of the same and the other, of white and black and so on. I argue that the discourse should abandon the idea of unified or oppositional cultures and instead emphasize the „composite-cultural", i.e. the entanglements of respective personal or societal forms of articulation and existence as well as profile the types of symbolic interpenetration, the temporally and aesthetically conditioned „dividuation". With examples from the African art context, I attempt to outline certain dividual procedures and to stress the fact that nowadays even western articulations are bound to endure forced cultural participation [Zwangsteilhabe]: Instead of discursive contrasts we are in need of analyses of the respective participation and (self-)dividuation processes.

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A “Stranger” Researching Narratives in Southern Slovakia: Hungarian Minority Research by an Anthropologist Who Is Not “At Home”

-Eurasian Research Center, Hokkaido University. Hann, Chris. 1987. The Politics of Anthropology in Socialist Eastern Europe. In: A. Jackson (ed.), Anthropology at Home. 139–153. London: Tavistock Publications. Hann, Chris. 2007. Anthropology’s Multiple Temporalities and Its Future in Central and Eastern Europe. In: C. Hann et al. (eds.), Anthropology’s Multiple Temporalities and Its Future in Central and Eastern Europe: a Debate. (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology Working Papers 90). 1–11. Halle/Saale: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology. ( http

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From the Concept to the Practice of Parliamentary Immunity

Abstract

Scholars have long debated the normative rationality, the temporal and legal aspects, and finally the limits and modern practices of parliamentary immunity. Therefore, this study does not insist on these classical interpretations anymore, but seeks to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the conceptual history of parliamentary immunity. Embracing two schools of thought, the Koselleckian interpretation and the Skinnerian variant, this paper aims to establish and clarify in detail the story of the concept of parliamentary immunity in order to elucidate, in a Socratic fashion, what we really mean when we say that a senator or a deputy benefits from legislative immunity. This inquiry will help us emphasise how this concept leaves behind its abstract notion and becomes an institution with strict rules and practices. In addition, considering the importance of this concept in the modern legislative and rhetoric histories and the frequency with which it is used, this study will question the meanings of parliamentary immunity in the light of different historical settings and will eventually trace out a single, coherent, and unified conceptual matrix. My contention is that once parliamentary immunity – seen as a conceptual construct only adjusting the balance of power between the executive and the legislative powers – becomes an institution with strong practices, it enforces the parliament as a unified and independent body and creates the prerequisite conditions for the democratic development.

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Narrative des Anthropozän – Systematisierung eines interdisziplinären Diskurses

Abstract

The Anthropocene concept originates from earth system sciences and conceptualizes humanity as a planetary geophysical force. It links current action-oriented time horizons to Earth historical deep time and implies non-separability of natures-cultures. The Anthropocene concept has resonated in debates in natural and social sciences, the humanities and the broader public, serving as an inter- and transdisciplinary bridging concept. Based on an analysis of numerous texts from multiple scientific disciplines and media, this contribution distinguishes five narratives of the Anthropocene: the disaster narrative, the court narrative, the Great Transformation narrative, the (bio-)technological and the interdependence narrative. The five narratives articulate very different perspectives and experiences and transport divergent political, economic, ethical and anthropological values and interests; this is also shown in alternative conceptualizations such as Eurocene, Technocene, Capitalocene or Plantationocene. The analysis reveals that the narratives share significant structural characteristics concerning story, plot, protagonists, spatial and temporal structure and action-oriented emplotment which together can be referred to a meta-narrative of the Anthropocene. Since the partly overlapping, partly contradictory narratives compete for legitimation and dominance in science and the broader public, the findings raise the question whether this struggle will stabilize or undermine the Anthropocene meta-narrative in the long run.

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Genetic analysis of cabbages and related cultivated plants using the bag-of-words model

database on CDROM. Plant Systematics and Evolution , 259, 249–258. [38] Mummenhoff, K., Al-Shehbaz, I. A., Bakker, F. T., et al., 2005. Phylogeny, morphological evolution, and speciation of endemic Brassicaceae genera in the Cape flora of southern Africa. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden , 92, 400–424. [40] Couvreur, T., Franzke, A., Al-Shehbaz, I. A., et al., 2010. Molecular phylogenetics, temporal diversification, and principles of evolution in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Molecular Biology and Evolution , 27, 55–71. [42] Franzke, A

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Mechanisms of Europeanisation and Compliance in Judicial Politics: Understanding the Past and Anticipating the Future

. Reconstituting Paradise Lost: Temporality, Civility, and Ethnicity in Post-CommunistConstitution-Making. Law & Society Review, 38 (3), 407-432. Přibáň, J. 2010. Constituting the Heterarchy of European Constitutionalism in the EU’s New Member States. In: In: A. Febbrajo and W. Sadurski, eds. Central and Eastern Europe After Transition. Towards a New Socio-legal Semantics , Ashgate, 13-35. Pridham, G. 2006. Assessing Democratic Consolidation in Central and Eastern Europe: The European Dimension. Acta Politica , 41, 342-369. Pogany, I. 1993. Constitutional

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Representational Systems in Zoosemiotics and Anthroposemiotics Part II: On Meta-Representation and Human Language

., 2003. Left planum temporale: An anatomical marker of left hemispheric specialization for language comprehension. Cognitive Brain Research , 18(1), 1–14. [46] Josse, G., Hervé, P., Crivello, F., et al., 2006. Hemispheric specialization for language: Brain volume matters. Brain Research , 1068(1), 184–193. [47] Josse, G., Tzourio-Mazoyer, N., 2004. Hemispheric specialization for language. Brain Research Reviews , 44(1), 1–12. [48] Witelson, S.F., 1977. Anatomic asymmetry in the temporal lobes: Its documentation, phylogenesis and relationship to

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The Arabic Language: A Latin of Modernity?

-confessional norm in the East Roman Empire, from where the Arabs borrowed this model and modified for their own needs (cf Kościelniak 2004 ). In Eastern Christianity, this standard persisted in the Russian Empire until its collapse in 1917 or in Montenegro, where the temporal ruler continued to act as a polity’s bishop until 1851. Even the current Constitution of Greece, which provides for the Western-style division of Church and State, nevertheless, in Article 3 states that “[t]he prevailing religion in Greece is that of the Eastern Orthodox Church of Christ.” This

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Representational Systems in Zoosemiotics and Anthroposemiotics Part I: What Have the So-Called “Talking Animals” Taught Us about Human Language?

. Perceptual organization of auditory temporal patterns in European starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris ). Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics , 54(5), 567–578. [385] Chomsky, N., 1990. On formalization and formal linguistics. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory , 8(1), 143–147. [386] Lieberman, P., 2013. The unpredictable species: What makes humans unique. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. [387] Terrace, H.S., 2005. Metacognition and the evolution of language. In Terrace, H., Metcalfe, J. (Eds.), The missing link in cognition: Origins of self

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Anti-Islamism without Moslems: Cognitive Frames of Czech Antimigrant Politics

, 242), coupled with feelings of risk, danger, and threat. Increasing number of refugees in 2015 led temporally to the increasing coverage of issues related to migrants or Islam by the Czech media. The tenor of the news was negative, and the media used the concept of “othering” of the migrants ( Burešová and Sedláková 2016 ). It is therefore not surprising that the anti-Islam and antimigrant rhetoric is used by extremist politicians and their parties. This is a phenomenon typical for use in the toolbox of recent far-right parties in both Western and Central Europe

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