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American, British and Canadian Studies
The Journal of Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu
Open access
The Posthuman Body in Jennifer Egan’s “Black Box”

. Harraway, Donna. Simians, Cyborgs, and Women. The Reinvention of Nature. New York: Routledge, 1991. Print. Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Became Posthuman. Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1999. Print. Kaku, Michio. Physics of the Impossible. New York: Doubleday, 2008. Print. Kiran, Asle H. and Peter-Paul Verbeek. “Trusting Our Selves to Technology.” Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23.3-4 (December 2010): 409-427. Print. Kirtley

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Ars Aeterna
Literary Studies and Humanity
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The Migration Crisis as It Seems: Speech Manipulation Technology in US Internet Media

Abstract

The following paper is devoted to the study of speech manipulation technologies in US political media discourse. A number of web-based articles have been taken under consideration for this study. They demonstrate the problem arising from the refugee flow in Europe and create a special “image” of the complicated European situation. It is helpful to see how the situation appears in the Internet media since this type of mass communication is most influential these days. While considering a large amount of media texts, a special speech manipulation technology has been revealed. This phenomenon demonstrates a distinct structure and close interrelations of purposefully selected elements. Going through a number of stages we can find out the technology of speech manipulation – a system of using the aggregate of speech manipulation instruments in order to purposefully guide the reality perception of the mass audience. The external level of the texts enables us to take a penetrating look at the internal intentions. This knowledge will help us not to confuse the migration crisis as it is and the migration crisis as it seems.

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“Ava’s body is a good one”: (Dis)Embodiment in Ex Machina

Studies 17.3 (Autumn 1991): 439-460. Haraway, Donna [1985]. “A Cyborg Manifesto. Science, Technology and Socialist-feminism in the Late Twentieth Century.” The Cybercultures Reader. Ed. David Bell and Barbara Kennedy. New York: Routledge, 2000. 292-324. Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Became Posthuman. Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature and Informatics. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1999. Hillman, David and Ulrika Maude. The Body in Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2015. Jacobson, Brian R. “Ex Machina in the Garden

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Welcome to the Desert of the Anthropocene: Dystopian Cityscapes in (Post)Apocalyptic Science Fiction

.23 (3 Jan. 2002). Web. 15 Jan. 2018. Dick, Philip K. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? London: Millennium, 1999. Galvan, Jill. “Entering the Posthuman Collective in Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep ?” Science Fiction Studies 24.3 (1997): 413-429. Haraway, Donna. “A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and the Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century.” The Transgender Studies Reader . Ed. Susan Stryker and Stephen Whittle. New York: Routledge, 2006. 103-119. Haraway, Donna. “Anthropocene, Capitalocene

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New Poetics of the Film Body: Docility, Molecular Fundamentalism and Twenty First Century Destiny

Works Cited Anders, A. “Foucault and the ‘Right to Life’: From Technologies of Normalization to Societies of Control.” Disability Studies Quarterly 33.3 (2013): 1-18. Cadman, L. “Life and Death Decisions on Our Posthuman(ist) Times.” Antipode 41.1 (2009): 133-156. Darke, P. “No Life Anyway: Pathologizing Disability on Film.” The Problem Body . Ed. by S. Chivers and N. Markotic. Ohio: The Ohio State U.P., 2010. 97-101. Foucault, M. Abnormal: Lectures at the College De France 1974-1975. Trans. Graham Burchell. New York: Picador, 2003

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Whither Teaching in the University Novel?

Abstract

Scenes of explicit teaching make only limited appearances in the university novel since World War II. While it would be easy – if cynical – to attribute this minimization to the devaluation of teaching in the modern university, the importance of teaching and learning to sympathetic characters (and their lack of importance to corrupted figures) suggests that this lack of focus on the classroom stems from something else. Indeed, university novels tend to be fairly conservative aesthetically, and the demands of traditional narrative make extended classroom scenes difficult if not impossible to manage. Because of these narrative demands, learning and teaching take on different forms in the university novel, creating stories in which education corresponds to the struggle of teachers and students with and against administrators and buildings – stories that, therefore, resemble Leo van Lier’s observation about how remembering our own educations as stories contradicts more bureaucratic visions of learning. This observation holds true whether one considers better-known works of university fiction such as David Lodge’s Campus Trilogy, Mary McCarthy’s The Groves of Academe, and Julie Schumacher’s Dear Committee Members or lesser-known works produced by micro-presses and writers who are enabled by current technologies to publish electronically.

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Discipline and Murder: Panoptic Pedagogy and the Aesthetics of Detection in J.G. Ballard’s Running Wild

Abstract

My essay proposes a reading of J.G. Ballard’s 1988 novella Running Wild as a cautionary crime story, a parable about the self-fulfilling prophecies of contemporary urban fears and about the “prisons” they create in a consumerist, technology- and media-dominated civilization. Interpreted in the light of Foucault’s concept of panopticism, Ballard’s gated community as a crime setting reveals how a disciplinary pedagogy meant to obtain “docile bodies,” masked under the socially elitist comfort of affluence and parental care, “brands” the inmate-children as potential delinquents and ultimately drives them to an act of “mass tyrannicide.” Ballard uses the murder story as a vehicle for the exploration of the paradoxical effects of a regime of total surveillance and of mediated presence, which, while expected to make “murder mystery” impossible, allows for the precession of the representation to the real (crime). The essay also highlights the way in which Ballard both cites and subverts some of the conventions of the Golden Age detective fiction, mainly by his rejection of the latter’s escapist ethos and by the liminal character of his investigator, at once part of a normalizing panoptic apparatus and eccentric to it, a “poetic figure” (Chesterton) relying on imagination and “aestheticizing” the routines of the detection process.

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