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Press. Louw, Bill. 1993. Irony in the text or insincerity in the writer? The diagnostic potential of semantic prosodies. In M. Baker, G. Francis, E. Tognini-Bonelli (eds.). Text and technology, 157-176. Philadelphia/Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Mair, Christian. 2006. Twentieth-century English: History, variation, and standardization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Reppen, Randi. 2010. Using corpora in the language classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Rohdenburg, Günter and Julia Schlüter (eds.). 2010. One language, two grammars? Differences between

technology on L2 academic writing. Language Learning and Technology 12 (2): 31-48.

stance classification. In Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, 1163–1168. Sheffield, UK. Fuoli, Matteo. 2012. Assessing social responsibility: A quantitative analysis of Appraisal in BP’s and IKEA’s social reports. Discourse & Communication 6 (1): 55–81. Glynn, Dylan and Mette Sjölin. 2015. Subjectivity and epistemicity: Corpus, discourse, and literary approaches to stance. In D. Glynn and M. Sjölin (eds.). Corpus, discourse, and literary approaches to stance

207 Anneli Meurman-Solin and Jukka Tyrkkö (eds.). Principles and practices for the digital editing and annotation of diachronic data (Studies in Variation, Con- tacts and Change in English 14). Helsinki: Varieng. http://www.helsinki.fi/ varieng/series/volumes/14/. 2013. Reviewed by Anne Gardner, University of Zurich. Introduction Over the past decades the technologies available for representing texts from his- torical stages of a language in electronic format have advanced to such an extent that it is now feasible to supply digitally edited texts with annotation

the 1970s. For example, an increasing number of literary and cultural studies today make unprece- dented use of corpus data and corpus technology. Similar trends can be observed in economics and history, to mention just two more areas that have benefited from the empirical footing that corpus-based techniques pro- vide. In essence, therefore, it strikes me that it is important for corpus lin- guistics not to be absorbed by the digitalization of humanities. Quite on the contrary: the corpus-linguistic community should provide more of a plat- ICAME Journal No. 40 6

Texts: Coding conventions and lists of source texts. Helsinki: Department of English, University of Helsinki. Kytö, Merja and Erik Smitterberg. 2015. English genres in diachronic corpus linguistics. In P. Shaw, B. Erman, G. Melchers and P. Sundkvist. (eds.). From clerks to corpora: Essays on the English language yesterday and today , 117–133. Stockholm: Stockholm University Press. Lee, David Y.W. 2001. Genres, registers, text types, domain and styles: Clarifying the concepts and navigating a path through the BNC jungle. Language Learning & Technology: A Refereed

: 399-408. Louw, Bill. 1993. Irony in the text or insincerity in the writer? The diagnostic potential of semantic prosodies. In M. Baker, G. Francis and E. Tognini- Bonelli (eds.). Text and Technology, 157-176. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Milton, James. 2009. Measuring second language vocabulary acquisition. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. Murison-Bowie, Simon. 1996. Linguistic corpora and language teaching. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 16: 182-199. Myles, Florence, Janet Hooper and Rosamond Mitchell. 1998. Rote or rule? Exploring the role of formulaic language

. 1996 [1991]. Manual to the diachronic part of the Helsinki Corpus of English Texts. Coding conventions and lists of source texts. 3rd edition. Helsinki: Department of English, University of Helsinki. Kytö, Merja and Terry Walker. 2006. Guide to A Corpus of English Dialogues 1560–1760 (Studia Anglistica Upsaliensia 130). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Lee, David. 2001. Genres, registers, text types, domains and styles: Clarifying the concepts and navigating a path through the BNC jungle. Language Learning and Technology 5(3): 37–72. Leech, Geoffrey

and historical context. Part I, entitled “The formation of public news discourse and metadiscursive technology”, focuses on domain-specific key terms. Nicholas Brownlees inves- tigates editorial metadiscourse in early news periodicals between 1620 and 1695. He assigns the nominal forms he investigates into three different catego- ries: publication types (e.g. ‘book’), modes of presenting news (e.g. ‘account, relation, report’), and concepts of ‘news’. His findings indicate that the use of metatextual comments fluctuates during the century and reflects differences in

his work at what is today known as the Computational Language Unit (CLU) – a research and development centre for language technologies that has its roots in the early 1970s when the Norwegian Computing Centre for the Humanities was founded. The selection of papers under review celebrates Knut’s pivotal role in corpus linguistics over the past four decades by presenting an overview of the breadth of research that is conducted in Bergen (and some of its associated institutions) in the 21st century. All papers are freely available via an open-access online pub