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American, British and Canadian Studies
The Journal of Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu
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The Posthuman Body in Jennifer Egan’s “Black Box”

. Harraway, Donna. Simians, Cyborgs, and Women. The Reinvention of Nature. New York: Routledge, 1991. Print. Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Became Posthuman. Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1999. Print. Kaku, Michio. Physics of the Impossible. New York: Doubleday, 2008. Print. Kiran, Asle H. and Peter-Paul Verbeek. “Trusting Our Selves to Technology.” Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23.3-4 (December 2010): 409-427. Print. Kirtley

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Aesthetic Universals in Neil Gaiman’s Post-Postmodern Mythmaking

Abstract

Aesthetic theory, as reflected in both contemporary cognitive (Patrick Colm Hogan) and more traditional structuralist criticism (H.G. Widdowson), points to the dynamics between familiarity and surprise as the driving force behind the pleasure we derive from reading fiction. This paper explains how Neil Gaiman’s works, particularly his novel Neverwhere, utilize genre expectations and reinvent mythologies in order to captivate audiences in the current age of unprecedented access to information and a rather superficial intertextuality. The paper draws on Brian Attebery’s analyses of the literature of the fantastic to place Gaiman within the context of both modernist and postmodernist legacies, while proposing that his works could be best understood as representative of the current cultural paradigm, sometimes labelled as the pseudo-modern or post-postmodernism. The discussion of the shifting paradigm is used as a backdrop for the scrutiny of the devices employed in Gaiman’s writing: the pre-modern focus on storytelling, prototypicality, modernist “mythic principle”, postmodernist textual strategies, and utilization of current technologies and mass-communication media.

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Terminology as a Specific Carrier of Information

Abstract

This paper deals with terminology as a characteristic feature of the language used in science and technology. The lexical units in question serve the communication needs and demands of particular discourse communities, i.e., experts in different branches of science and specializations. Terminology precisely describes reality, carries specific information on the phenomena and relationships between them and helps to avoid shifts in meaning during the process of communication. In comparison with other spheres of life where shifts in meaning are common, in science and technology, changes in the information transferred are unacceptable and may lead to serious consequences. This paper focuses on various aspects and approaches to this part of the lexical system. Examples from the English language for Electrical Engineering and Communication Technologies provide an insight into different criteria for classifying units as terms, lexical patterns and semantic relationships between the individual constituents. Other features, qualities and functions of terminology, such as the stabilizing reality, interconnection between explicitness and implicitness or description of progress reflecting a unique attitude to reality are also discussed.

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Early Modern Cultural Hybridity: Bartholomew Fair as a Heterotopia of Hamlet

Works Cited Appadurai, Arjun. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, MN and London: University of Minnesota Press, 1996. Print. Barker, Timothy Scott. Time and the Digital: Connecting Technology, Aesthetics, and a Process Philosophy of Time . Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press/University Press of New England, 2012. Print. Barker, Timothy Scott. “Media Ecology in Michel Serres’s Philosophy of Communication.” Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, vol. 19, no. 1. 2015: 50–68. Print. DOI: 10

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The Migration Crisis as It Seems: Speech Manipulation Technology in US Internet Media

Abstract

The following paper is devoted to the study of speech manipulation technologies in US political media discourse. A number of web-based articles have been taken under consideration for this study. They demonstrate the problem arising from the refugee flow in Europe and create a special “image” of the complicated European situation. It is helpful to see how the situation appears in the Internet media since this type of mass communication is most influential these days. While considering a large amount of media texts, a special speech manipulation technology has been revealed. This phenomenon demonstrates a distinct structure and close interrelations of purposefully selected elements. Going through a number of stages we can find out the technology of speech manipulation – a system of using the aggregate of speech manipulation instruments in order to purposefully guide the reality perception of the mass audience. The external level of the texts enables us to take a penetrating look at the internal intentions. This knowledge will help us not to confuse the migration crisis as it is and the migration crisis as it seems.

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“Ava’s body is a good one”: (Dis)Embodiment in Ex Machina

Studies 17.3 (Autumn 1991): 439-460. Haraway, Donna [1985]. “A Cyborg Manifesto. Science, Technology and Socialist-feminism in the Late Twentieth Century.” The Cybercultures Reader. Ed. David Bell and Barbara Kennedy. New York: Routledge, 2000. 292-324. Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Became Posthuman. Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature and Informatics. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1999. Hillman, David and Ulrika Maude. The Body in Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2015. Jacobson, Brian R. “Ex Machina in the Garden

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Welcome to the Desert of the Anthropocene: Dystopian Cityscapes in (Post)Apocalyptic Science Fiction

.23 (3 Jan. 2002). Web. 15 Jan. 2018. Dick, Philip K. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? London: Millennium, 1999. Galvan, Jill. “Entering the Posthuman Collective in Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep ?” Science Fiction Studies 24.3 (1997): 413-429. Haraway, Donna. “A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and the Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century.” The Transgender Studies Reader . Ed. Susan Stryker and Stephen Whittle. New York: Routledge, 2006. 103-119. Haraway, Donna. “Anthropocene, Capitalocene

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New Poetics of the Film Body: Docility, Molecular Fundamentalism and Twenty First Century Destiny

Works Cited Anders, A. “Foucault and the ‘Right to Life’: From Technologies of Normalization to Societies of Control.” Disability Studies Quarterly 33.3 (2013): 1-18. Cadman, L. “Life and Death Decisions on Our Posthuman(ist) Times.” Antipode 41.1 (2009): 133-156. Darke, P. “No Life Anyway: Pathologizing Disability on Film.” The Problem Body . Ed. by S. Chivers and N. Markotic. Ohio: The Ohio State U.P., 2010. 97-101. Foucault, M. Abnormal: Lectures at the College De France 1974-1975. Trans. Graham Burchell. New York: Picador, 2003

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Whither Teaching in the University Novel?

Abstract

Scenes of explicit teaching make only limited appearances in the university novel since World War II. While it would be easy – if cynical – to attribute this minimization to the devaluation of teaching in the modern university, the importance of teaching and learning to sympathetic characters (and their lack of importance to corrupted figures) suggests that this lack of focus on the classroom stems from something else. Indeed, university novels tend to be fairly conservative aesthetically, and the demands of traditional narrative make extended classroom scenes difficult if not impossible to manage. Because of these narrative demands, learning and teaching take on different forms in the university novel, creating stories in which education corresponds to the struggle of teachers and students with and against administrators and buildings – stories that, therefore, resemble Leo van Lier’s observation about how remembering our own educations as stories contradicts more bureaucratic visions of learning. This observation holds true whether one considers better-known works of university fiction such as David Lodge’s Campus Trilogy, Mary McCarthy’s The Groves of Academe, and Julie Schumacher’s Dear Committee Members or lesser-known works produced by micro-presses and writers who are enabled by current technologies to publish electronically.

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