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Technology and peer review: the open and participatory dimension

British Academy. (2007). Executive Summary and Recommendations. Retrieved from http://goo.gl/SKkDEz. The Royal Society. (1995). Peer Review - An assessment of recent developments. Retrieved from http://goo.gl/RH27TU. Ware, M., & Monkman, M. (2008). Peer review in scholarly journals: Perspective of the scholarly community - an international study. Retrieved from http://goo.gl/ThJCXp. Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar. How technology is transforming scholarly practice. London: Bloomsbury Academic

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Educational technology for inclusion: Design of an educational software for individuals with autism spectrum disorders

Abstract

The study illustrates the design, prototyping and production stages of an educational software aimed at promoting the development of social skills in autistic pupils attending the Italian primary school. The educational design of the proposed activities within the software was created on the basis of the theory of simplexity, while the design of the forms of interaction of the activities was constructed on the basis of the tasks proposed in the educational programme for autistic individuals by Patricia Howlin. The research project aims to achieve two objectives: creating an educational freeware software designed to foster the development of social skills in autistic pupils attending Italian primary schools; assessing if and to what extent the introduction of a technological variable can determine changes in terms of teaching effectiveness in Howlin’s programme.

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Lepage and the New “Myth” of Technology

Abstract

Focusing on the famous Lepage’s Hamlet, seen in the National Theatre Festival, Bucharest, 2017, I try to discuss a few things about what appears to be a new “mythology” in making theatre: the myth of technology.

Open access
The application of new technologies in promoting a healthy lifestyle: selected examples

1 Introduction The increasing popularity of mobile devices, which is accompanied by constantly decreasing data transfer costs, mean that a significant proportion of society is currently remaining permanently on-line. Typically, people used the Internet indoors, but being constantly on-line requires technology to be transferred outdoors (e.g. to public spaces). Even according to research by Forlano (2008) conducted a decade ago, more than 25% of hotspot users in parks admitted that they had not visited these places before Wi-Fi signal transmitters were

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Adaptive Development of a Regional Spatial Data Infrastructure Facing Local Prospects and Socio-Technological Trends

compositions, too, to appraise their changing role amidst the dynamic advancements in information and communication technologies (ICT), spatial data and social habits. 2 Materials and methods The focus area of the Lounaispaikka-SDI covers an area of about 20 000 km 2 and a population of circa 500 000 inhabitants – almost 200 000 of them in the city of Turku. The infrastructure is provided by seven public organisations, all of which benefit from positive visibility due to their engagement. The strongest impetus for the public authorities (two Regional Councils, the

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Education: 13. Benefits of Art Pedagogical Technologies in the Process of Primary School Adaptation

Abstract

The article deals with the problem of primary school adaptation. The innovative art technologies described by the author seem to create an optimal environment to make the process of adaptation n primary classes easier. This research highlights the benefits of art pedagogical technologies. It also suggests a framework for some art pedagogical activities. The author offers some methodological suggestions for teachers, who could help primary school learners to adapt to the new school environment.

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The Influence of New Technologies on the Social Withdrawal (Hikikomori Syndrome) Among Developed Communities, Including Poland

Abstract

Hikikomori social withdrawal syndrome was first diagnosed in Japan and means a person who has been isolated from society to an extreme degree. She/he does not attend school or go to work. They do not attend university, they constantly remain at home and most often keep contact with the outside world using new technologies. Hikikomori syndrome is most often recognized as a characteristic problem occurring among Asian societies. Meanwhile, the growing dependence on new technologies among Western societies, and in particular, on the Internet, has caused social withdrawal to become a global problem. Human relationships began to move from the real world to the virtual world, which nowadays is full of communication facilities and allows people to establish relationships with other people without leaving their homes with the help of social media, which are currently packed with advanced solutions connecting people of similar interests or views. All this means that nowadays it is easy to withdraw from physical social life without losing virtual contact with others.

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Post-industrial university towns and the triple helix concept: case studies of Bristol, Sheffield, Novosibirsk and Tomsk

on 2,000 of the city’s lampposts. This platform allows companies to test new technologies in a real-world environment. The Engine Shed incubator is another interesting project in Bristol, the result of the successful SETSquared partnership of six universities across the south-west of England ( Clark, Williams, 2014 ). The Engine Shed incubator ranks 8th among 64 of the best university business-incubators in the world, and 14th among 64 cities by growing small and medium enterprises ( University Business Incubator, 2014 ). It supports key knowledge

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