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Favourite Research Topics of Estonian Ethnographers Under Soviet Rule

Abstract

Estonian ethnography as one of the Estonia-related disciplines was tied with Estonian nationalism from the very beginning. Defined as a science investigating mainly the material side of vanishing traditional peasant culture in the 1920s, it fitted rather well with the Soviet understanding of ethnography as a sub discipline of history. Thanks to the major cooperation projects initiated and coordinated by ethnographers from Moscow, Soviet Estonian ethnographers could continue studying Estonian traditional peasant culture. Their favourite research topics (folk costume, peasant architecture and traditional agriculture) supported Estonian national identity, but also suited the framework of Soviet ethnography. Studying contemporary (socialist) everyday life was unpopular among Estonian ethnographers because the results had to justify and support Soviet policy. They did so unwillingly, and avoided it completely if possible. Despite of some interruption during the Stalin era, ethnography managed to survive as a science of the nation in Soviet Estonia.

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Oromo Proverbs and Proverbial Expressions in the Customary Judicial System in Ethiopia

Mechanism of Conflict Resolution among the Oromo: The Case of Reejjii Institution of Jimma, Ethiopia. – The Journal of Oromo Studies 22 (1): 69–89. Regassa, Megersa and Dejene Gemechu. 2015b. Jigaa Institution: The Surviving Gadaa Court among the Jimma Oromo, Ethiopia. – Ethiopian Journal of Social Sciences and language Studies 2 (2): 3–23. Minahan, James. 2002. Encyclopedia of the Stateless Nations: Ethnic and National Groups Around the World III, L–R. Westport, CT; London: Greenwood Press. Nanda, Serena. 1994. Cultural Anthropology . 5th

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Landscape and Gods Among the Khanty

. - Eesti Rahvakultuur, edited by Ants Viires and Elle Vunder. Tallinn: Eesti Entsüklopeediakirjastus, 379-395. Wiget, Andrew and Olga Balalaeva. 2011. Khanty, People of Taiga: Surviving the Twentieth Century. Fairbanks, AK: University of Alaska Press.

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Cross-Cultural Filmmaking as a Process of Self-Reflection: Filming Native Americans within Central European Space’s Prevailing Imagery of the “Noble Savage”

. VIZENOR, G. (1993). The Ruins of Representation: Shadow Survivance and the Literature of Dominance. In. American Indian Quarterly 17:1, pp. 7-30. WEATHERFORD, E. (ed) (1981): Native Americans on Film and Video. New York: National Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation. WEINBERGER, E. (1992): The Camera People. In. Transition 55, pp. 24-54. WILSON, P. - STEWART, M. (eds.) (2008): Global Indigenous Media: Cultures, Poetics, and Politics. Durham and London: Duke University Press. WOLFE, T. (2000

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Cultural Identities in Sustaining Religious Communities in the Arctic Region: An Ethnographic Analysis of Religiosity from the Northern Viewpoint

Abstract

Northern countries are facing the challenges of declining human capital, and admitting immigrants, many of whom belong to religious minorities, to satisfy the demand for labour. If northern societies accept multiculturalism and immigrants, they should not disregard the cultures and religious practices (for example, ritual slaughter) of immigrants, as they need to survive and integrate as a minority community in a secular society. However, there is clash between secularism and religions permitting animal slaughter, which is prohibited by some and allowed by other European countries. Community viability and sustainability depend partly on the exercise of community beliefs and ideology that support identity behaviour. This study will present an ethnographic analysis of the religiosity related to ritual slaughter and Muslim cultural identity in the European Arctic region and explore how religious relativism and practice sustain the community and support the overall integration of the Muslim minority in the North.

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Contemporary Citizenship: Four Types

relations that accompanied a patriarchal culture. In the English case, he could also ignore the problem of aboriginal minorities that have been significant in modern debates about citizenship, especially in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. The task facing citizenship studies after Marshall is to recognise the diversity of forms of citizenship and the specific problems of these different traditions and then to analyse whether any form of democratic citizenship can survive the social and economic changes associated with globalisation. In modern theories of citizenship

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