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Forms of Recall – Politics of Memory. Memory as the Non-Chronological Narrative Form of Historical-Political Identity Quest in the Kádár Regime and Its Survival in the Postcommunist Period

Abstract

In the film art of the Kádár regime the modernist non-chronological narrative mode became the dominant form of remembrance and communicative memory. In the 35-year period between 1956 and 1990 we can find thirty-five films of this type (e.g. Dialogue [Párbeszéd, János Herskó, 1963], Twenty Hours [Húsz óra, Zoltán Fábri, 1965], Cold Days [Hideg napok, András Kovács, 1966], Love [Szerelem, Károly Makk, 1971], Lovefilm [Szerelmesfilm, István Szabó, 1970], Diary for My Children [Napló gyermekeimnek, Márta Mészáros, 1982]), the majority of which thematize the communicative memory of the recent past of the period (World War II, the Hungarian Holocaust, the 1950s, 1956, the Kádár consolidation) as opposed to the amnesia politics of the time. Although this cinematic corpus is connected to the film history of the Kádár era with all its elements (form: modernism; theme: communicative memory; political discourse: recollection; official politics of memory; the counterdiscourse of Kádár’s amnesia politics), it survives in the postcommunist period (e.g. Hungarian Fragment [Pannon töredék, András Sólyom, 1998], White Palms [Fehér tenyér, Szabolcs Hajdu, 2006], Mom and Other Loonies in the Family [Anyám és más futóbolondok a családból, Ibolya Fekete, 2015]). After presenting the non-chronological narrative form of historical-political identity quest, the paper seeks to find reasons for the survival of this form and tries to draw conclusions regarding the social aspect and modes of expression of the Hungarian film history of the postcommunist period.

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Surviving history: Kate Chopin

Abstract

Bearing witness to the colonial and anti-feminist atmosphere of 19th-century America, Kate Chopin created her works against a background of all kinds of repression reigning over social life. Likewise, Désirée’s Baby focuses mainly on a young woman’s marital life and the social/familial problems she confronts because of her personal background and imperial and gender-based oppression surrounding her life. Through a new historicist reading, the story has several humane elements to be taken into account. Reflecting the periphery and the repressed, Désirée’s Baby is a significant anticanonical writing with an inspiring human touch and a historically excluded work which depicts the dramatic existential problems of the time

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Graphic Narratives of Women in War: Identity Construction in the Works of Zeina Abirached, Miriam Katin, and Marjane Satrapi

, Community. Eds. N. K. Miller, J. Tougaw, University of Illinois, 2002. 71-91. -----. “Surviving Images: Holocaust Photographs and the Work of Postmemory.” The Yale Journal of Criticism 14.1 2001: 5-37. -----. and Leo Spitzer. “The Witness in the Archive: Holocaust Studies / Memory Studies.” Memory Studies 2.2 2009: 151-170. Katin, Miriam. We Are on Our Own. Montreal: Drawn & Quarterly, 2006. Liebman Jacobs. “Women, Genocide, and Memory. The Ethics of Feminist Ethnography in Holocaust Research.” Gender and

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President Trump’s Declarations on Official Development Assistance: A Change of Policy?

://www.politico.com/story/2016/11/united-nations-donald-trump-effect-231626 . Patten, C. Will Trump Bring Down the West? “The Project Syndicate” (November, 2016). Web. 15 November 2018, https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/trump-threat-to-the-west-by-chris-patten-2016–11 . Round, J.I., Odedokun, M. Aid Effort and Its Determinants . “International Review of Economics and Finance”, vol. 13, Issue 3 (2004), pp. 293–309. Shuster, S. Can NATO Survive a Donald Trump Presidency? “Time” (November, 2016). Web. 15 November 2018, http://time.com/4569578/donald

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Confronting the International Order: Changes in US Foreign Policy from the Perspective of American Power Elites

Relations Press, 1996. Haass, R.N. A World in Disarray: America Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order . New York: Penguin Press, 2017b. Haass, R.N. Where to Go From Here. Rebooting American Foreign Policy . “Foreign Affairs”, no. 96.4 (2017c), pp. 2–9; Haass, R.N. World Order 2.0. “Foreign Affairs”, no. 96.1 (2017a), pp. 2–9. History . “Foreign Affairs”. Web. 14 Sep 2018, https://www.foreignaffairs.com/history . Ikenberry, G.J. The Plot Against American Foreign Policy. Can the Liberal Order Survive . “Foreign Affairs”, no. 96

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Yuan Versus United States Dollar: the Defective Bipolar China–United States Relationship

gold imports and renminbi outflows , “Financial Times”, December 1, 2016, Web. 11 February 2017, www.ft.com.content/cc6b5622-b79b-11e6-ba85–95d1533d9a62 . Williamson, John. A short history of the Washington Consensus , [in:] The Washington Consensus Reconsider. Towards a New Global Governence, Eds. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Yao, Yang. The End of Beijin Consensus. Can China’s Model of Authoritarian Growth Survive? , “Foreign Affairs”, February 2010. Web. 30 May 2016, http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/china/2010–02–02/end

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The Discreet Horror of the Holocaust in Ida Fink’s Stories

Abstract

The topic of the article is writings by Ida Fink. It analyses stories of the author of Wiosna 1941 (The Spring 1941) which refer to the Holocaust. The analysis also draws attention to the poetics of “discreet horror” in which Ida Fink’s stories are embedded. In her records the author does not underline the cruelty, but shows the terror of the situation by subtle narrative and compositional manoeuvres. The picture of death is de-emphasised by the psychology of characters, and the main focus are complicated human relationships in which the author with a great delicacy presents various emotional states of people who, despite being sentenced to death, still try to survive the war.

Ida Fink’s stories are different from the majority of Holocaust literature which exposes the severity and brutality of mass death. These stories stand out as an exceptional phenomenon among works by such authors as Tadeusz Borowski, Zofia Nałkowska, Leon Buczkowski, Henryk Grynberg or Bogdan Wojdowski.

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Gender, the Nigerian Civil War and Hard Choices: Nihilism or Absurdism (?) in Isidore Okpewho’s The Last Duty

, H. Joseph. “Prisoners of Manliness”. In The Hazards of Being Male: Surviving the Myth of Masculine Privilege. By Herb Goldberg. New York: Penguin, 1976. Ike, Chukwuemeka. Sunset at Dawn. Ibadan: Fontana Books, 1976. Iroh, Eddie. Toads of War . Ibadan: Heinemann, 1979. lyayi, Festus. Heroes. London: Longman Group Limited, 1996. Lynn, Stephen. Texts and Contents: Writing About Literature with Critical Theory (First Edition). London: Harper Collins, 1994. Nietzsche, Friedrich. Twilight of the Idols. Chicago: The Great Books

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