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Managing Information Flow in Self-Organising Networks of Communication Between Construction Project Participants

integrating multiple theoretical perspectives and influencing factors.” Project Management Journal 42.3 (2011): 4-22. [5] Moreno, Jacob Levy. “Who shall survive?: A new approach to the problem of human interrelations.” (1934). [6] Loosemore, Martin. “Construction crises as periods of social adjustment.” Journal of management in engineering 13.4 (1997): 30-37. [7] Loosemore, Martin. “Social network analysis: using a quantitative tool within an interpretative context to explore the management of construction crises.” Engineering, construction and

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Performance-Based Analysis of Older-Type Large-Space Hall in Fire

Abstract

The paper presents the example of performance-based analysis for the existing large-space steel structure raised in 1980s. Hall is used as a paper products warehouse. Advanced mechanical simulations are performed using Safir software. Factors that impact the final fire resistance of the structure are discussed. Local and global imperfections and possible ways of structure modelling are taken into account. For selected cases advanced fire scenario that considers both localised fire and possibility of further ignition of stored goods is prepared using Fire Dynamics Simulation software. The results obtained indicate that added imperfections have little impact on the fire resistance of the structure and older-type steel hall roof without any fire protection could survive 30 minutes of fire. Main failure modes and values of structure’s deflections are also presented. Finally, performed simulations show that even for large-space structure the flashover is possible in some special cases.

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Evolutionary Stable Strategies In Networked Games: The Influence Of Topology

Abstract

Evolutionary game theory is used to model the evolution of competing strategies in a population of players. Evolutionary stability of a strategy is a dynamic equilibrium, in which any competing mutated strategy would be wiped out from a population. If a strategy is weak evolutionarily stable, the competing strategy may manage to survive within the network. Understanding the network-related factors that affect the evolutionary stability of a strategy would be critical in making accurate predictions about the behaviour of a strategy in a real-world strategic decision making environment. In this work, we evaluate the effect of network topology on the evolutionary stability of a strategy. We focus on two well-known strategies known as the Zero-determinant strategy and the Pavlov strategy. Zero-determinant strategies have been shown to be evolutionarily unstable in a well-mixed population of players. We identify that the Zero-determinant strategy may survive, and may even dominate in a population of players connected through a non-homogeneous network. We introduce the concept of ‘topological stability’ to denote this phenomenon. We argue that not only the network topology, but also the evolutionary process applied and the initial distribution of strategies are critical in determining the evolutionary stability of strategies. Further, we observe that topological stability could affect other well-known strategies as well, such as the general cooperator strategy and the cooperator strategy. Our observations suggest that the variation of evolutionary stability due to topological stability of strategies may be more prevalent in the social context of strategic evolution, in comparison to the biological context.

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Application of Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm to Healthcarewaste Prediction

Algorithms, in: Proceedings of the 11th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, vol. 1, 1989, pp. 762-767. [16] A. Kattan, R. Abdullah and R. A. Salam, Training Feed-Forward Neural Networks Using a Parallel Genetic Algorithm with the Best Must Survive Strategy, in: Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Systems, Modelling and Simulation (ISMS), pp. 96-99, Liverpool, UK, 2010. [17] J. A. Blackard and D. J. Dean, Comparative Accuracies of Arti?cial Neural Networks and Discriminant Analysis in Predicting

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Analysis of Self-Organising Networks of Communication Between the Participants of a Housing Complex Construction Project

.8 (2006): 638-649. [4] Hanisch, Bastian, and Andreas Wald. “A project management research framework integrating multiple theoretical perspectives and influencing factors.” Project Management Journal 42.3 (2011): 4-22. [5] Moreno, Jacob Levy. “Who shall survive?: A new approach to the problem of human interrelations.” (1934). [6] Scott, John. Social network analysis . Sage, 2017. [7] Wasserman, Stanley, and Katherine Faust. Social network analysis: Methods and applications . Vol. 8. Cambridge university press, 1994. [8] Loosemore, Martin

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Specifics of pesticides effects on the phytopathogenic bacteria

Abstract

The data concerning the effects of pesticides of different nature on the phytopathogenic bacteria was examined and summarized. Without extensive research on the mechanisms of interaction between pathogenic bacteria and pesticides in the literature review a similar message about microorganisms of soil and phyllosphere are included. The bacteria can be suppressed permanently by pesticides with a mechanism of action that universally affects biological processes in living systems. Long-term storage, ease of use and fast visible effect are the advantages of synthetic pesticides remedies. But chemical pollution, shifts in the balance of ecosystems, unpredictable effects of chemical pesticides on non-target objects are the drawbacks. Stimulation of resistance response in plants is unifying factor for all types of biopesticides. This is realized through localization of the pathogen during infection, blocking its further penetration, distribution and reproduction. The results of the study of effects of plant protection products on the phytopathogenic bacteria of main crops are described. Among all tested pesticides, thiocarbamate fungicides demonstrated significant inhibitory action on phytopathogens, but their effect may be neutralized by other constituents of multicomponent preparations. Triazole fungicides affect the causative agents of bacterioses of crops at a dose of more than 1% of the active substance in the nutrient medium. Insecticides and herbicides have little or no effect on phytopathogenic bacteria; however they can enhance morphological dissociations of some Pseudomonas strains, thereby increasing their ability to survive. The disadvantage of many biopesticides against phytopathogenic microorganisms is the difference between their efficacy in vitro and in vivo that is why the desired result is not achieved in field condition. In addition, biological pesticides often lose their activity causing the problem of constant search for new active antagonists. The fact that the sensitivity of phytopathogenic bacteria to pesticides is strain-dependent should be considered in practice, particularly, assessment of the antibacterial action of various preparations should not be limited to a single bacterial strain.

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GNU Radio Based Testbed (GRaTe-BED) for Evaluating the Communication Link of Unmanned Aerial Systems

communication link reliability study for small unmanned aerial vehicles”, Enerdyne Technologies, Inc.-COMM OPS Trends in Communication Systems For ISR UAVs , January 2009, http://www.milsatmagazine.com/story.php?number=893938022 . [8] Pywell, M., Midgley-Davies, M. “EW test and evaluation - assuring survivability and operational effectiveness”, Electromagnetic Engineering Department BAE SYSTEMS, Military Air & Information http://tangentlink.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/2.-Electronic-Warfare-Test-Evaluation-Mitch-Midgley-Davies.pdf . [9] Miko, G., Nemeth, A

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Embending Sustainability Dynamics in the Lean Construction Supply Chain Management

] COMM, C.L., MATHAISEL, D.F.X. A case study in applying lean sustainability concepts to universities. I nt. J. Sust. Higher Edu. Volume 6 (2005) No 2, 134-146. [59] HINES, P., HOLWEG, M., RICH, N. Learning to evolve e a review of contemporary lean thinking. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Volume 24 (2004) No 10, 994-1011. [60] HINES, P., FOUND, P., GRIFFITHS, G., HARRISON, R. Staying Lean: Thriving, Not Just Surviving. Lean Enterprise Research Centre, Cardiff University, Cardiff, 2008. [61

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