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The Memory of Theatre. Theatricalization of Memory

Abstract

Theatre as living art, the central purpose of which is life, existence, that is, that can perceive matter as a set of images, a meeting point of the spirit with matter, enters the realm of memory, when it requires precise indications necessary for the scenic representation. Memory is a living organism, it is the warm fire of preparing theatre. We perceive Hamlet acting on stage because we remember that perception. Hamlet – the one that we will see in a few years, in a completely different time, in another geography, will be perceived, criticized, understood, by evoking the memories that have survived or have been adapted, transformed, reinterpreted. The memory facilitates the meeting between the actor and the character, the memory facilitates the meeting between the director and the text, between the director and the concept, the memory brings the playwright face to face with his work. In the The Misunderstanding, Albert Camus imagines psychological dimensions where memory plays the role of central mechanism. We are face to face with the absurd man, who through the awareness of death and crime meets his truth, but at the same time we discover a dissociation of the characters that, despite their rigidity and coldness, maintain the appearance of a structural and functional fluidity. The dialogue has the resonance of a frequency that vibrates from the river of collective memory. The individual memory has split and is to be absorbed by another memory, one of the theatre, a universal memory, a memory of a theatre that was born from memory.

Open access
Hamlet Ex Machina

Abstract

Art movements don’t end up at a precise moment, but they can survive over the decades in different ways, even if they could be considered out of date. Today, we live in the post-human or the post-digitalized era, but here and now we also recognize marks or processes derived from the art of the ‘80s. What are postmodernism’s shadows that have been shaping recent years’ performances and how does Romanian theatre directing look like, seen against the bigger drama background in or within our European continent – those are the two main questions to which our study tries to find potential answers. Given that we don’t want to lose ourselves into various theatre productions, we have chosen to verify this with an ageless play – Hamlet. How do they (still) look like and what do they hide again, the new profiles of the prince who speaks to us about the death of sleep’s dreams – those are the questions depicted from the hyper-technological identities of Hamlet ex machina.

Open access