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Spaces of (Re)Connections: Performing Experiences of Disabling Gender Violence

Abstract

The article explores the potential “healing” role performance art can have when representing disabling trauma, and engaging, as part of the creative process, participants who have experienced in their lives significant trauma and physical, as well as mental health concerns arising from gender violence. It focuses on the show cicatrix macula, performed during the exhibition Speaking Out: Women Healing from the Trauma of Violence (Leicester, 2014). The exhibition involved disabled visual and creative artists, and engaged participants in the process of performance making. It was held at the Attenborough Arts Centre in Leicester (UK), a pioneering arts centre designed to be inclusive and accessible. The show cicatrix macula focused on social, cultural, mental, and physical representations of trauma and disability, using three lacerated life-size puppets to illustrate these depictions. Working under the direction of the audience, two artists attempted to “repair” the bodies. The creative process was a collaborative endeavour: the decision-making process rested with the audience, whose privileged positions of witness and meaning-maker were underscored. Fayard demonstrates the significance of cicatrix macula in debunking ablist gender norms, as well as in highlighting the role played by social and cultural enablers. She calls attention to its potential for mobilizing positive identity politics, including for viewers who had experienced trauma. For example, the environment of the participatory performance space offered some opportunities for the survivor to become the author or arbiter of her own recovery. In addition, the constant physical exchange of bodies within this space of debate was well-suited to the (re)connection with the self and with others.

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“You’ll never meet someone like me again”: Patty Jenkins’s Monster as Rogue Cinema

Abstract

Film is a powerful medium that can influence audience’s perceptions, values and ideals. As filmmaking evolved into a serious art form, it became a powerful tool for telling stories that require us to re-examine our ideology. While it remains popular to adapt a literary novel or text for the screen, filmmakers have more freedom to pick and choose the stories they want to tell. This freedom allows filmmakers to explore narratives that might otherwise go unheard, which include stories that feature marginal figures, such as serial killers, as sympathetic protagonists, which is what director Patty Jenkins achieves in her 2003 film Monster. Charlize Theron’s transformation into and performance as Aileen Wuornos, and Jenkins’s presentation of the subject matter, make this film an example of rogue cinema. In addition, Aileen Wuornos is portrayed as a clear example of the rogue character. This character trope frequently defies social standards, suffers from past trauma, is psychologically complex, and is often exiled. As a prostitute and social outcast, Aileen Wuornos exists on the fringes of society and rejects the hegemonic power structure and later heteronormativity of society, which makes her a rogue figure. While there are several aspects to consider when analyzing Jenkins’s film, my intention is to argue that this film is an example of rogue cinema because of its content. In order to accomplish this task, I examine Theron’s bodily transformation and her performance as Wuornos. Furthermore, I look at how Jenkins handles the depiction of romantic love and gendered violence and argue that her treatment of this content renders this film rogue.

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Theater Without a Script—Improvisation and the Experimental Stage of the Early Mid-Twentieth Century in the United States

-Off-Broadway Movement . Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2006. Print. Braun, Kazimierz. Krótka historia teatru amerykańskiego . Poznań: Wydawnictwo Naukowe UAM, 2005. Print. Caines, Rebecca, and Ajay Heble. The Improvisation Studies Reader: Spontaneous Acts . Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. Print. Coleman, Janet. The Compass: The Story of the Improvisational Theatre that Revolutionized the Art of Comedy in America . New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1990. Print. “Environmental Theatre.” Britannica.com . Encyclopædia Britannica. Web. 10 Mar. 2018. “Fluxus, Performance

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Roguish Self-Fashioning and Questing in Aleksandar Hemon’s “Everything”

2009): n.pag. Quarterlyconversation. com . Web. 23 Jul. 2019. Reynolds, Bryan. Becoming Criminal: Transversal Performance and Cultural Dissidence in Early Modern England . Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins UP, 2002. Print. Rimbaud, Arthur. “Le Bateau ivre.” Poésies . Mag4.net . Web. 23 Jul. 2019. Schaffer, Andrew. Literary Rogues: A Scandalous History of Wayward Authors . New York: HarperCollins, 2012. Print. Shippey, Tom. Introduction. The Complete Old English Poems . Transl. Craig Williamson. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 2017. xv

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Philosophical dialogue – towards the cultural history of the genre

, Richard. 1986. Story, Performance, and Event: Contextual Studies of Oral Narrative . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Bauman, Richard & Briggs, Charles. 1992. Genre, Intertextuality and Social Power. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 2(2). 131-172. Berkeley, George. 1998. Three dialogues between Hylas and Filonous . Oxford: Oxford University Press. Cassirer, Ernst. 1972. Essay on Man: An Introduction to a Philosophy of Human Culture . Yale University Press. Certeau de, Michel. 1984. The Practice of Everyday Life , transl. S. Rendall

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Mimesis in Crisis: Narration and Diegesis in Contemporary Anglophone Theatre and Drama

W orks cited Brecht, Bertolt. “Short Description of a New Technique of Acting which Produces an Alienation Effect.” Trans. John Willett. The Twentieth Century Performance Reader . Ed. Michael Huxley and Noel Witts. London: Routledge, 1997. 99–111. Print. Diamond, Elin. Unmaking Mimesis . London: Routledge, 1997. Print. Elam, Keir. The Semiotics of Theatre and Drama . London: Routledge, 2002. Print. Forced Entertainment. Showtime . Performance script. 1996. Print. Forced Entertainment. Showtime . 1996. Video recording

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Sex-speare vs. Shake-speare: On Nudity and Sexuality in Some Screen and Stage Versions of Shakespeare’s Plays

MacLachlan, Diane Venora, Bill Murray, Julia Styles. Double A Films, 2000. Film. Hamlet . Dir. Łukasz Barczyk. Perf. Michał Czernecki, Janusz Gajos, Grażyna Szapołowska, Kamilla Baar, Jan Frycz. TVP, 2004. Teleplay. Hamlet . Dir. Jarosław Bielski. Perf. Raúl Chacón, Borja Manero, Socorro Anadón, Marta Eguía. Réplika Teatro, Madrid. 2007 (shown at the 12th Shakespeare Festival in Gdańsk in 2008). Stage performance. Hamlet . Dir. Kenneth Branagh. Perf. Kenneth Branagh, Julie Christie, Derek Jacobi, Richard Briers. Castle Rock

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Negotiating Reality: Sam Shepard’s States of Shock, or “A Vaudeville Nightmare”

of Performance . New York: Palgrave, 2015. Print. Cumings, Bruce. War and Television . New York: Verso, 1992. Print. Demastes, William W. Theatre of Chaos: Beyond Absurdism, Into Orderly Disorder . Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2005. Print. DeRose, David J. Sam Shepard . New York: Twayne, 1992. Print. Mamet, David. The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture . New York: Sentinel, 2012. Print. Mamet, David. “Why I Am No Longer a ‘Brain-Dead Liberal.’” Villagevoice.com . Village Voice 11 Mar. 2008. Web. 1 May 2016

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Transgression of Postindustrial Dissonance and Excess: (Re)valuation of Gothicism in Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive

Abstract

The paper gives insight into the revaluation of popular Gothic aesthetics in Jim Jarmusch’s 2014 production Only Lovers Left Alive. Drawing on critical theory and the postmodern theoretical framework, the article suggests that the film transgresses contemporary culture immersed in a “culture of death” that has produced a vast amount of cultural texts under the rubric of “Gothicism.” By considering Jean Baudrillard’s concept of transaesthetics and Judith Halberstam’s writings on contemporary monstrosity, the paper shows that a commodified Gothic mode has lost its older deconstructive functions that operated on the margins of the mainstream. Now entirely focused on the duplication of the same aesthetic codes and signs, Gothic productions conform to the rules of postindustrial culture, enriching entertainment imagery with the neutralized concept of “otherness.” Hence, the article engages primarily with Jarmusch’s indie aesthetics that goes beyond easily recognizable patterns and generic conventions and allows the director to emphasize that the arts are rejuvenating forces, the antidote to a commoditized environment. Then, the focus is on the construction of main characters—Adam and Eve, ageless vampires and spouses—who thanks to nostalgic theatricality and performance reconfigure the mainstream monstrosity. Ultimately, the article emphasizes that Jarmusch’s film, to a large extent, becomes a warning against the inevitable results of advanced capitalism practiced on a global scale.

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Theatre as Contagion: Making Sense of Communication in Performative Arts

: Lukas & Sternberg, 2002. Print. Fischer-Lichte, Erika. Performativität. Eine Einführung . Bielefeld: Transcript, 2012. Print. Fischer-Lichte, Erika. The Transformative Power of Performance: A New Aesthetics . Trans. Saskya Iris Jain. London: Routledge, 2008. Print. Foster, Susan Leigh. “Movement’s Contagion: The Kinesthetic Impact of Performance.” The Cambridge Companion to Performance Studies . Ed. Tracy C. Davis. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. 46–59. Print. Garner, Stanton B. “Artaud, Germ Theory, and the Theatre of Contagion.” Theatre

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