Search Results

1 - 10 of 23 items :

  • "performance" x
  • European Languages, other x
Clear All
Differences Across Levels in the Language of Agency and Ability in Rating Scales for Large-Scale Second Language Writing Assessments

used to measure writing performance in US intensive English programs. The CATESOL Journal 22(1). 113–130. Billig, Michael. 2008. The language of critical discourse analysis: The case of nominalization. Discourse & Society 19(6). 783–800. DOI: 10.1177/0957926508095894 Brindley, Geoff. 1998. Describing language development? Rating scales and SLA. In Lyle F. Bachman & Andrew D. Cohen (eds.), Interfaces between second language acquisition and language testing research , 112–140. New York: Cambridge University Press. Bucholtz, Mary & Kira Hall. 2005

Open access
Let Them Be Heard: Bringing Native American Experience Closer in Teaching

, and confronting: Critical race theory, tribal critical race theory and multicultural education. International Journal of Multicultural Education 10(2). 1–15. DOI: 10.18251/ijme.v10i2.137 Hill, Randall T. G. 1997. Methodological approaches to Native American narrative and the role of performance. American Indian Quarterly 21(1). 111–147. DOI: 10.2307/1185590 Hogan, Linda. 2014. Workday. In Dark. Sweet. New & selected poems. Minneapolis, MN: Coffee House Press. Howe, LeAnne. 2002. The story of America: A tribalography. In Nancy Shoemaker (ed

Open access
Timon of Athens (1606?) and Timon (1602?): Rhetorical and Ritualistic Violence

Abstract

This article seeks to explore representations of theatrical anger in William Shakespeare and Thomas Middleton’s Timon of Athens (1606?) and a play written by students from one of the Inns of Court, the Inner Temple, entitled Timon, written and performed at the Inn circa 1602. The article is concerned with two types of violence exhibited in both plays; rhetorical violence and ritualistic violence. Early modern rhetorical violence is self-consciously performative and manipulative compared to ritualistic violence which is unbridled and emasculating; a bodily performance that cannot be controlled via self-regulation. By exploring cultural perceptions of anger, this article attempts to account for the range of violence performed by the two Timons.

Open access
Rhetorical Evaluation of Seventeenth Century Prefaces to English Treatises on Midwifery

Rhetorical Evaluation of Seventeenth Century Prefaces to English Treatises on Midwifery

This study tries to offer a rhetorical account of the main arguments and figures encountered in 17th c. English prefaces, dealing with the art of midwifery and the delivery of children. I foreground a main causal argument wherein the author states the necessity for a treatise of this delicate nature and proposes the motives for its requirement. In doing so, some other reasonings support the causation and provide the reader with more evidence for a good performance at childbirth. In addition, the arguments are enhanced by the presence of some figures of communion that contribute to the rhetorical organisation, and help to portray the prologue as an expository discourse. The insistence on complying with the author's directions, and the urge not to follow some predecessors' work also suggests the new authority that the early modern English preface writer is acquiring.

Open access
Iconicizing Kingship in Elizabethan England: Strategic Acting by Queen Elizabeth I

Abstract

Renaissance England is often discussed in the context of theatre and theatrical acting. The fact is that Renaissance monarchs, too, viewed kingship in terms of theatrical display and public performance. Such is the nature of royalty presented by King James I in Basilicon Doron. Queen Elizabeth I was playing all her life. Faced with the problem of her femininity in the world of men, as well as her ambivalent hereditary rights as a member of the Tudor dynasty, she focused on legitimizing her reign through playing different roles - she played the fearful king, the loving queen, she even played Virgin Mary. But Elizabeth emerges as the most stunning actress when she plays herself. On her summer visit to Wanstead in 1578 she took an active part in the pageant “The lady of May”, playing herself, “Good Queen Bess”, which Sir Philip Sidney depicted in his pastoral romance The lady of May. In this way, Elizabeth became her own icon. This paper provides instances of the Queen’s political role play in a historical and socio-cultural context of the time.

Open access
Patterns of Pronunciation of English Interdental Fricatives by Some Yoruba Speakers of English in a Nigerian University

Abstract

This paper is an investigation of the pronunciation patterns of English interdental fricatives by some Yoruba speakers of English at Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife. This was with a view to finding out the extent to which gender, the level of education, and the position in words of the interdental fricatives (i.e., the (th) variable as in think, pathetic, and path on the one hand, and the (dh) variable as in then, father, and clothe on the other hand) could affect the realisations of these two fricatives, otherwise known as (th) and (dh) variables. Data eventually used for this study were drawn from the reading performance of thirty-three informants who were of Yoruba origin. The thirty-three informants comprised 20 male and 13 female subjects with different levels of education ranging from undergraduate to doctoral. Our findings indicated that the (dh) variable was significantly affected by gender while the (th) variable was not. It was also demonstrated that while the (th) was significantly affected by the level of education of informants, the (dh) variable had no statistically significant association with the speakers’ level of education. Finally, the results of the study revealed that the position in a word (whether initial, medial, or final) of each of the variables affected the realisations of the two variables significantly. It was therefore concluded that sociolinguistic variables such as gender and the level of education were capable of affecting the rendition of linguistic variables significantly.

Open access
Wealhtheow’s Peace-Weaving: Diegesis and Genealogy of Gender in Beowulf

ABSTRACT

This article uses Charles S. Peirce’s concept of icon and Judith Butler’s idea of genealogy of gender to study levels of fictionality in the Old English poem Beowulf. It shows that Wealhtheow, the principal female character in the epic, operates as a diegetic reader in the poem. Her speeches, in which she addresses her husband King Hrothgar and Beowulf contain implicit references to the Lay of Finn, which has been sung by Hrothgar’s minstrel at the feast celebrating Beowulf’s victory. It is argued here that Wealhtheow represents herself as an icon of peace-weaving, as she casts herself as a figuration of Hildeburh, the female protagonist of the Lay of Finn. Hildeburh is the sister of Hnæf, the leader of the Danes, and is given by her brother to Finn the Frisian in a marriage alliance. In her role as a peace-weaver, the queen is to weave peace between tribes by giving birth to heirs of the crown. After the courtly minster’s performance of the Lay, Wealhtheow warns her husband against establishing political alliances with the foreigner Beowulf at the expense of his intratribal obligation to his cousin Hrothulf, who is to become king after Hrothgar’s death.

Open access
Hawthorne’s Perspectival Perversity: What if “Wakefield” Were (About) a Woman?; or, Credo Quia Absurdum

Abstract

Although “Wakefield” opens as a leisurely mnemonic act, it turns into an intensely emotional affair. However, the stance of moral indignation and, indeed, condemnation adopted in many readings of this classic tale seems to be a monological trap, an interpretive ride along Einbahnstrasse. The present close re-reading draws on the combined appreciation of perversity as (i) formal figuration in which the bearings of the original are reversed, (ii) attitudinal disposition to proceed against the weight of evidence (the so-called ‘being stubborn in error’). Building on this logic, the paper offers a transcriptive anti-type response to Hawthorne’s title. It is meant as a detour of understanding and a reclamation of a seemingly obvious relational and denotative proposition. Inasmuch as “Wakefield” is a distinctive rhetorical performance, foundationally a story about story-telling, its title can be naturalized as identifying the story-teller. Even if this does not come across as lucius ordo, it is argued that the order of reappropriative and be-longing signification is that of Mrs. rather than - as is commonly believed - that of Mr. Wakefield. Informed by object permanence and a peculiar looking bias, “Wakefield” proves to be her-tale rather than his-story. As a secret sharer and a would be-speaking gaze, the wife turns out to be a structural and existential pivot of the narrative. More broadly, Mrs. Wakefield can be appreciated as coarticulator of a ventriloquistic logos and choreographer of a telescopic parallactic vision. Unintentional challenge to both the heresy of paraphrase and the aesthetics of astonishment, this is ultimately to proffer a radical Shakespearean/Kantian re-cognition that in certain spheres there obtains nothing absolutely ‘moral’ or ‘immoral’, and it is only a particular perspectival discourse that may make it so.

Open access
“… the ruins of Europe in back of me.” Jan Klata’s Shakespeare and the European condition

%82-niemcom-w-bochum-krzykliwego-i-szokuj%C4%85cego-hamleta/a-16664425 (accessed 20 April 2015). Festiwal Szekspirowski. Spotkanie po spektaklu Tytus Andronicus J. Klaty [The Shakespeare Festival – a meeting after the performance of J. Klata’s Titus Andronicus ] (6 August 2013). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w061fdjikPg (accessed 12 April 2015). Gieleta, Michał. 2013. Michał Gieleta: Nie obraziłem się na polski teatr (wywiad) [I didn’t take offence with the Polish theatre. An interview]. Wysokie Obcasy (19 April 2013). http

Open access
Anxiety in Spanish EFL University Lessons: Causes, Responsibility Attribution and Coping

S. Magnan. 2005. Anxiety and the true beginner dynamic in beginning French and Spanish classes. Foreign Language Annals 38(2). 171-186. Fukai, Miyuki. 2000. Foreign language anxiety and perspectives of American college students of Japanese in the United States: An exploratory study. Japanese-Language Education around the Globe 10. 21-41. Ganschow, Leonore, Richard Sparks, Reed Anderson, James Javorshy, Sue Skinner & Jon Patton. 1994. Differences in language performance among high-, average-, and lowanxious college foreign language

Open access