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Collection of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates from Milk, Dairy Products and Food Processing Environments in Slovakia for the Purposes of European Molecular Database

., 2013: ECDC starts pilot phase for collection of molecular typing data. Euro Surveill. , 18, pii: 20357. 11. Véghová, A., Koreňová, J., Minarovičová, J., Drahovská, H., Siekel, P., Kaclíková, E., 2015: Isolation and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from the environment of three ewes’ milk processing factories in Slovakia. Journal of Food and Nutrition Research , 54, 252—259.

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Prevalence, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Molecular Typing of Thermophilic Campylobacter Spp. in a Greek Poultry Slaughterhouse

Abstract

Campylobacter species are one of the leading causes of foodborne disease. Poultry is a major reservoir and source of its transmission to humans. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. isolated from chicken carcasses, the environment, and processing equipment of a poultry slaughterhouse in Greece, to identify the dominant Campylobacter species and to determine if there are clonal relationships among the isolates. Fifty poultry samples and 25 environmental samples were examined using microbial cultures and PCR. Forty-nine of 50 poultry samples (98%) were found to be positive for Campylobacter spp. The environment of the slaughterhouse was also found to be significantly contaminated with Campylobacter spp. Thirty-seven isolates were found to be susceptible to all antimicrobials tested (56.1%) and 29 isolates showed resistance to at least two of the antimicrobials tested (43.9%). We observed 24 different PFGE-types among the 53 isolates with 14 of them isolated only once, while five PFGE-types were represented by two isolates. The remaining 29 isolates were represented by five PFGE-types each consisting of three to 12 isolates. Regarding the relationship of the PFGE types and corresponding resistance profiles, all strains of each PFGE-type shared the same antimicrobial resistance profile. This study reports evidence for Campylobacter spp. cross-contamination among broiler carcasses in a Greek slaughterhouse.

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Antimicrobial susceptibility, plasmid profiles, and RAPD-PCR typing of Acinetobacter bacteria

Abstract

Background: Multiple-drug resistant Acinetobacter have widely spread in the last decades imposing a serious nosocomial source of infection. Nevertheless, little knowledge was gaimed on tracing the development of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter species. Objectives: Explore Acinetobacter spp. via antimicrobial susceptibility, plasmid profiles, and random amplified polymorphism DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) typing. Methods: One hundred twelve Acinetobacter isolates (including 66 A. baumannii and 46 non-Acinetobacter baumannii strains) were obtained from three university hospitals. The source of infection of these isolates included blood, urine, wound, and respiratory tract. Their susceptibilities to 17 antibiotics were tested and then all Acinetobacter isolates were typed by plasmid analysis and RAPD-PCR method. Results: A. baumannii isolates revealed nine different patterns of antibiotic resistance. Of those, non- A. baumannii, were associated with plasmid and RAPD-PCR typings (p <0.05). A. baumannii was more resistant to multiple antibiotics than non-A. baumannii (p <0.05). Seven different plasmid profiles were observed among 112 Acinetobacter isolates. Plasmids were found in 107 (95.5%) of the 112 isolates. Unlike in RAPD-PCR typing, there was no difference between the type of Acinetobacter, A. or non-A. baumannii strains and plasmid profiles (p >0.05). By RAPD-PCR, six profiles were found for each A. and non-A. baumannii strains. The pattern 6 was the most common pattern among the isolates. Both plasmid and RAPD-PCR typing showed no association between plasmid profiling and site of infection (p >0.05). Conclusion: There is a wide spread of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter spp., particularly A. baumannii, in the Middle East region that can be traced efficiently by plasmid and genotyping typing of Acinetobacter. More care should be taken for tracing the development of antimicrobial resistance of Acinetobacter using precise molecular typing techniques.

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Fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of leptospires isolated from field rats and comparison with reference Leptospira serovars

polymorphism.Vet Rec. 1993; 132:325-6. 11. Natarajaseenivasan K, Prabhu N, Selvanayaki K, Raja SS, Ratnam S. Human leptospirosis in Erode, South India: serology, isolation, and characterization of the isolates by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2004; 7: 193-7. 12. Perolat P, Grimont F, Regnault B, Grimont PA, Fournie E, Thevenet H, et al. rRNA gene restriction patterns of Leptospira: a molecular typing system. Res Microbiol. 1990; 141:159-71. 13. Kositanont U, Chotinantakul K

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Development of PCR-based identification of Salmonella enterica serovars

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate and adapt the PCR-based protocol that utilizes the developed serotype-specific primers to identify Salmonella enterica species and its serotypes that are most frequently isolated from poultry samples in Vojvodina. Using the slide agglutination test, 64 and 33 out of 107 Salmonella isolates were identified as S. Infantis and S. Enteritidis, respectively, while ten isolates were identified as eight different Salmonella serovars. Using the same isolates, presence of 993-bp (bcfC gene), 636-bp (steB gene) and 293-bp (sdf locus) amplicons in multiplex PCR unambiguously identified 31 isolates as S. Enteritidis. Two isolates identified as Enteritidis in slide agglutination test were not identified as such in PCR-based approach since they both were missing 293-bp long PCR product. Thirty-nine isolates produced a 727-bp amplicon in the specific simplex PCR, and thus were identified as S. Infantis. The greatest discrepancy in comparison to the results of conventional serotyping has been observed in the case of S. Infantis, since 25 more isolates were noted as S. Infantis by conventional serotyping. Seven isolates, with unexpected PCR profiles stayed unidentified by molecular typing, although they were serotyped as S. Typhimurium (1) and S. Infantis (6). S. Gallinarum serovar has to be additionally confirmed, since it shares the same PCR profile with S. Livingstone. Clearly, PCR-based identification has to be thoroughly checked, verified and adapted if it is to be applied as the routine identification protocol.

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Examining the Possibility of Detecting Brucella Canis from Tissue Samples Using Bruce-Ladder Multiplex PCR Assay

-ladder) for molecular typing of all Brucella species, including the vaccine strains. J Clin Microbiol 2008, 46:3484-3487. 3. OIE Manual of diagnostic test and vaccines for terrestrial animals: Bovine Brucellosis. Offi ce International des epizootics, Paris 2009, Chapter 2.4.3. 4. Alton GG, Jones LM, Angus RD, Verger JM: Tehniques for the brucellosis laboratory. INRA, 1988, 169-174. 5. Badakhsh FF, Carmichael LE, Douglas JA: Improved rapid slide agglutination test for presumptive diagnosis of canine brucellosis. J Clin

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Survey Of Infectious Agents Associated With Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex (PRDC) In Serbian Swine Herds Using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Detection

Eurasian wild boar. J Vet Diagn Invest 2003, 15:364–368. 13. Mayor D, Zeeh F, Frey J, Kuhnert P: Diversity of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in pig farms revealed by direct molecular typing of clinical material. Vet Res 2007, 38:391–398. 14. Townsend KM, Boyce JD, Chung JY, Frost AJ, Adler B: Genetic Organization of Pasteurella multocida cap Loci and Development of a Multiplex Capsular PCR Typing System. J Clin Microbiol 2001, 39:924–929. 15. Schaller A, Djordjevic SP, Eamens GJ, Forbes WA, Kuhn R, Kuhnert P, Gottschalk M, Nicolet J, Frey J: Identification

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Neurological Diseases of Small Ruminants in Greece: A Retrospective Study in 114 Flocks

:275-296. 8. Skerritt GC. New diagnostic and operative approaches for gid. Proc Sheep Vet Soc 1987, 12:12-17. 9. Fragkiadaki EG, G Vaccari, LV Ekateriniadou, U Agrimi, ND Giadinis, B Chiappini, E Esposito, M Conte, R Nonno: PRNP genetic variability and molecular typing of natural goat scrapie isolates in a high number of infected fl ocks. Vet Res 2011, 42:104-110. 10. Pugh DG, A.N. Baird: Sheep and Goat Medicine, 2nd ed. Elsevier Saunders, 2011. 11. Kanata E, C Humphreys-Panagiotidis, ND Giadinis, N Papaioannou, M Arsenakis, T

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Investigation On The Etiology Of Subclinical Mastitis In Jersey And Hybrid Jersey Dairy Cows

contagious mastitis agents (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from milks of dairy cows with subclinical mastitis, Turk J Vet Anim Sci, 37, 569-574, 2013. 29. Cengiz S, Tekin O, Akan M: Molecular typing of Enterococcus spp. isolated from cow mastitis, Vet J Ankara Univ, 58, 17-20, 2011. 30. Malinowski E, Lassa H, Smulski S, Klossowka A, Kaczmarowski M: Antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria isolated from cows with mastitis in 2006-2007, Bull Vet Inst Pulawy, 52, 565-572, 2008. 31. Persson Y, Nyman AKJ, Grönlund-Andersson U

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Mechanisms of Resistance to Quinolones and Epidemiological Significance of Salmonella spp.

tetracycline resistance of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Infantis isolated from poultry in the northern part of Serbia. Acta Vet Beograd 2015, 65:548-556. 47. Velhner M, Kozoderović G, Jelesić Z: Antibiotic resistance to fluoroqionoles in Salmonella spp.: Recent findings in Serbia and brief overview of resistance mechanisms and molecular typing methods, Proceedings “One Health-New Challenges” First International Symposium of Veterinary Medicine, Hotel “Premier Aqua”, Vrdnik, May 21-23, 2015, 468-472.

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