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Orange or Pink? Colours, Houses and Modernity in Rural Romania

Practice. Annals of tourism research , 35(2): 316-337. Castells, M. (2010 [1996]). The Rise of the Network Society . West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell. Cohen, E. (1984). The Sociology of Tourism: Approaches, Issues, and Findings. Annual review of sociology, 10: 373-392. Giddens, A. (2000 [1990]). Consecinţele modernităţii [The Consequences of Modernity]. Bucharest. Univers. Mihăilescu, V. (2011). Zoom urban. Dilema veche [Urban Zoom, in the weekly entitled ‘ The Old Dilemma ’], 368. Mihăilescu, V. (2005). Între stil şi brand. Turismul

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Identity and the New Nationalist Pronouncements

Abstract

It is a common mistake to believe that identity deals with history, our memory, and our roots. While the center of identity-related processes is quite different, it cannot certainly ignore objective reality, and the individual’s past. The inflationary use of the term dates only half a century back. Before that (except for administration) rarely was there any question of identity posed, because the individual was defined mainly by the institutional frameworks that determined him. The question of identity might have emerged gradually, as the gap widened, in the case of an individuality willing to be asserting itself as autonomous. First and foremost, it emerges out of subjectivity at work, with the purpose of making meaning which, in turn, is no longer conferred only by the social position occupied. It is an ever changing meaning, and in every instance a necessary condition of action. This is so because in a society dominated by reflexivity and critical thinking, the individual is persistently compelled to get involved in a cognitive functioning of the opposite type, in order to be able to act, creating small beliefs underlying personal evidences. At the heart of the most advanced modernity, the core of identity processes is, surprisingly, of a religious type. This process does not render itself evident in an isolated manner. Various affiliations (cultural, national, and religious) may be used, as well as many others resources, often mobile and diverse, which may turn into totalitarian, fixed, exclusive and sectarian statements. By such a framing of the entire landscape of the identity process, one may better understand the paradoxical situation of current nationalist expressions in Europe. They do not disappear, but sometimes even materialize into acute forms, even if the frameworks of socialization become increasingly transnational. It is precisely because the objective substrate of national identity is weakening, that its eruptive movements (during crises provoked by extremely different reasons) become unpredictable and uncontrollable and particularly dangerous for democracy.

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From Cow to Cradle. Mutations and Meanings of Rural Household in Post-socialism

decoration by recent homeowners. In I. Cieraad (ed.) At Home. An Anthropology of Domestic space . Syracuse, pp.60-72. NY: Syracuse University Press. Douglas, M. (1966) Purity and Danger . London: Ark. Drazin, A. (2001) A Man will get Furnished: Wood and Domesticity in Urban Romania. In Daniel Miller (ed.) Home possessions , pp.173-200. Oxford, NY: Berg. Drazin, A. (2005) Architecture without Architects: Building Home and State in Romania. Home Cultures , 2(2): 195-220. Ferguson, J. (1999) Expectations of Modernity: Myths and Meanings of Urban

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Envisioning Higher Education: How Imagining the Future Shapes the Implementation of a New Field in Higher Education

, Steward Tansley, and Kristin Tolle (eds.). 2009. The Fourth Paradigm. Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery . Redmond, WA: Microsoft Research. Honegger, Claudia, Hans-Ulrich Jost, Susanne Burren, and Pascal Jurt. 2007. Konkurrierende Deutungen des Sozialen. Geschichts-, Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften im Spannungsfeld von Politik und Wissenschaft . Zürich: Chronos. Jasanoff, Sheila. 2015. Future Imperfect: Science, Technology, and the Imaginations of Modernity. Pp. 1–33 in Dreamscapes of Modernity: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and the Fabrication of

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Mobile Eating: A Cultural Perspective

Abstract

Over 80 percent of North Americans regularly eat in the car, yet neither mobility literature nor expanding discussions of food cultures focus on the practice. Two studies shed light on eating in the car. First, North American’s distinct, dynamic, and embedded mobile food infrastructure is outlined via discussion of noteworthy innovations - from the 19th century dining car to the 21st century drive thru - that food entrepreneurs constructed to facilitate eating on the go. Second, four exploratory focus groups investigate the meanings and practices drivers associate with eating in the car. Together findings suggest that eating in the car is compromised by the demands of accelerating modernity. Framing eating in the car as simply another facet of an obesity crisis, as culinary preference, or personal choice and responsibility limits full understanding of the cultural anxieties, environmental and health risks surrounding this widespread food practice.

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A Place Called Supermarket

References Augè, M. (1995) Non-Places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity. London, New York: Verso. Bauman, Z. (1994) Modernity and Ambivalence , Cambridge: Polity. De Certeau, Michel. (1998) The Practice of Everyday Life . Bekerley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press. Douglas, M. and B. Isherwood (1979) The world of Goods: Towards an Anthropology of Consumption . Middlesex: Penguin. Fonseca, C. (1999) ‘Quando cada caso não é um caso. Pesquisa etnográfica e educação’. Revista Brasileira de

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Stories of Love and Hate. Images of ‘Homeland’ in the Identity Narratives of Romanians in Ireland

, Difference. J ournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 36(4):541-560. Giddens, A. (1991) Modernity and Self-Identity: Self and Society in the Late Modern Age . California: Stanford University Press. Georgiou, M. (2006) Diaspora, Identity and the Media. Diasporic Transnationalism and Mediated Spatialities . Hampton Pres inc, Cresskill, New Jersey. Goffman, E. (1990[1963]) Stigma. Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity. London: Penguin Books. Hall, S. ([1992] 1994) The Question of Cultural Identity. In Hall, S. and Held, D. and McGrew, T. (eds

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Neoliberalism: A Foucauldian Perspective

References Agamben, G. (2005) State of Exception . Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Becker, G. (1976) The Economic Approach to Human Behaviour . Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Burchell, G., C. Gordon and P. Miller. (1991) The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality . Hemel Hampstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf. Comaroff, J. and J. Comaroff. (1997) Of Revelation and Revolution: The Dialectics of Modernity on a South African Frontier . Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Dreyfuss, H. and P. Rabinow. (1983) Michel

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Globalizing Locations: Production-Consumption Relations in the Hip-hop Movement in Brazil and Portugal

References Appadurai, A. (1996) Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, MN: Minessota University Press. Andrade, E. (1999) (ed.) RAP e educação – RAP é educação . São Paulo: Summus. Bauman, Z. (2000) Liquid Modernity . Cambridge: Polity Press. Beck, U. (2000) What is globalization . Cambridge: Polity Press. Boudieu, P. (1994) ‘Gostos de classe e estilos de vida’. In Ortiz, R. (ed.) Pierre Bourdieu, pp. 82-121. São Paulo: Ática. Campos, R. (2007) Pintando a Cidade: Uma abordagem

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Sociological Tasks in View of the Transition to Post-carbon Societies. Also a Comment to Michael Redclift

References Beck, U. (2010) ‘Climate for Change, or How to Create a Green Modernity?’ Theory, Culture & Society , 27(2-3): 254-266. Burawoy, M. (2005) ‘The critical turn to public sociology’. Critical Sociology , 31(3): 313-326. Davis, M. (2010) ‘Who will build the ark?’, New Left Review , 61: 10-25. Giddens, A. (2010) The Politics of Climate Change. Cambridge, MA: Polity Press. Hulme, M. (2009) Why We Disagree About Climate Change: Understanding Controversy, Inaction and Opportunity . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

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